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Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 January 2016 - 11:14am
Tangled Metal wrote:Bmblbzzz wrote: There is no way those 4x4s with all season off road tyres should have got stuck when my car got through.
Except they probably weren't on all season tyres.

Well there was some writing on the spare tyre saying all season so I assumed the 4 being used were the same. I don't know if they were those half winter tyres you can get that are better than summer tyres in winter but not fully winter tyres so are better all year round.

Also if my front wheel drive Astra with budget summer tyres got through without difficulty then surely putting 4 wheels in motion should perform better even with summer tyres. Other factors in 4x4 design also add to better Winter performance. All being equal I'm certain I'd manage that day in a 4x4. I always think there's a lot to be said for the ability/experience of the driver and cyclist when it comes it. Whether winter driving/riding or touring.
Fair enough! I still think that, in snow or ice on roads, proper winter tyres (with the snowflake and mountain symbol) will make more of a difference than 4WD; that is, after all, what people use in snowy climes from Russia to Quebec, etc. But certainly driver ability (and attitude?) are very important.

Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 January 2016 - 10:53am
syklist wrote:pete75 wrote:I'm not against Euro touring bikes just don't have your view that they're superior to other types. I have one myself , a German VSF TX400 with a 14 speed hub gear on the back. Bought it on a whim really just to try out Rohloff . It's not a bad bike to ride and my son really likes it so he usually uses it. I prefer the tourer I built for myself and don't most serious touring cyclists build up their own bikes with the components they choose?.
So if you don't build a bike from the components you choose, you cannot be considered to be a "serious cycle tourist"?

My VSF T400 Rohloff came with the components I wanted. The main changes were saddle and handlebars and the bike was ordered with lowriders which were not included in the basic specifications. I'm obviously not serious enough

Where did I say what you imply, I said most not all which is not the same thing at all, though perhaps many would have been a better choice of word than most.
It's fine if you can find an off the shelf bike with all the components you want and the TX400 costs a lot less than the individual component cost - a Rohloff is about 900 quid here, almost 200 for the schmidt dyno hub and about £150 for the pair of Tubus racks fitted but the whole bike cost £1400 new including delivery from Germany. The standard spec included a Tubus Tara lowrider. VSF seem to put a lot more thought into their basic spec than many other manufacturers.

Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 January 2016 - 10:35am
pete75 wrote:I'm not against Euro touring bikes just don't have your view that they're superior to other types. I have one myself , a German VSF TX400 with a 14 speed hub gear on the back. Bought it on a whim really just to try out Rohloff . It's not a bad bike to ride and my son really likes it so he usually uses it. I prefer the tourer I built for myself and don't most serious touring cyclists build up their own bikes with the components they choose?.
So if you don't build a bike from the components you choose, you cannot be considered to be a "serious cycle tourist"?

My VSF T400 Rohloff came with the components I wanted. The main changes were saddle and handlebars and the bike was ordered with lowriders which were not included in the basic specifications. I'm obviously not serious enough

Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 January 2016 - 10:34am
+1 for drop bars (unless for really rough stuff). However, drop bars do not automatically imply 28 inch wheels and reduced load carrying capacity. A Thorn Sherpa is capable of heavy duty, but at the same is not at all in the European tractor mode. If you know you wil carry only 12-15 kg a lighter frame than that of the Sherpa is possible, but even then 26 inch wheels are nice for gravel roads or rough tarmac.

Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 January 2016 - 10:26am
I took a chance with a flat bar hybrid after my road bike became safe. I was starting to commute to work and the roads I used near work were terrible so I thought a tougher bike than a road bike was needed. I just couldn't get on with the flat bars. I broke my hand years ago and have elbow and wrist issues from wear and demanding use so need to change hand positions a lot. Not possible on simple flats. I looked.around and decided ergon grips and bar ends were needed.

Fortunately the bike was stolen before I got them so I switched.to a drop bar bike. Never looked back since. I've gone.from painful in less than an hour to actually being able to ride on the drops for ages. Drop bars just work for me. I need the flexibility of hand positions to relief build up of pain especially in one elbow which "goes crunchy" on flat bars.

Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 January 2016 - 10:14am
al_yrpal wrote:My steel Salsa Vaya begins to struggle with a touring load and camping gear on the road and its just about ok on smooth surface off road unloaded. It wouldnt be suitable for a camping trip that involved off road riding. I never rode my Galaxy with camping gear on a tour but I dont think it would be ideal. It was a lively twitchy steed. I think that all the book is saying is that there are better bikes for doing a camping trip that involves off road riding. Having heard and seen peoples notions of what off road riding is on this site over the years, some peoples notions are far adrift from mine.

Al

That sums it up nicely. My 700c tourer (Thorn Cub Tour) is designed to carry camping gear on roads (including poor tarmac) and smoothish tracks, and it does that reliably and with no fuss. Better than any MTB. But I would not expect it to cope well with rough tracks. I would get off and walk.

Incidentally, a Galaxy that doesn't handle well with camping gear is defective. That, surely, is what a Galaxy is meant for.

Re: Mysterious Lights on the Bath Bristol Path

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 10:11am
syklist wrote:Anyway, hub dynamo/LED light lighting system are so cheap and effective these days that I feel that there is a good case to say that all bikes should have them fitted as standard.
Or at least more general purpose bikes should come with them fitted. I can understand why someone who doesn't ever ride at night or has a treasured lightweight or mountain bike might not want one.

here in Norway
I fear that this is this is the issue. Where bicycles are sold primarily as a form of transportation things like hub dynamos make sense. In the UK bicycles tend to be sold as sporting items. Typically weight is the headline figure in advertisements and this is kept low by not including "accessories" such as mudguards, racks, lights, dynamos, pumps, chainguards,....

Re: What camera?

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 10:09am
Personally I want a dual bullet camera wired to a central recorder.

But I want a bike 'dashcam', not an action camera

Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 January 2016 - 10:05am
My steel Salsa Vaya begins to struggle with a touring load and camping gear on the road and its just about ok on smooth surface off road unloaded. It wouldnt be suitable for a camping trip that involved off road riding. I never rode my Galaxy with camping gear on a tour but I dont think it would be ideal. It was a lively twitchy steed. I think that all the book is saying is that there are better bikes for doing a camping trip that involves off road riding. Having heard and seen peoples notions of what off road riding is on this site over the years, some peoples notions are far adrift from mine.

Al

Re: Mysterious Lights on the Bath Bristol Path

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 10:02am
Bicycler wrote:I've yet to come across a retina melting flashing daytime running light on a car YMMV
Not flashing, but they are all horribly dazzling

Re: Mysterious Lights on the Bath Bristol Path

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 9:35am
Si wrote:I'm noticing more bikes on the road with bright lights switched on in the middle of light days. Hope that we don't get to the point where drivers expect all bikes to have bright lights in the middle of the day and thus only look for the light and not the cyclist.
I wouldn't worry too much. I noticed recently whilst driving here in Norway that, although I notice cars with day running lights, the cars that stand out like a sore thumb are the ones where the lights are turned off. YMMV.

Anyway, hub dynamo/LED light lighting system are so cheap and effective these days that I feel that there is a good case to say that all bikes should have them fitted as standard.

Re: Mysterious Lights on the Bath Bristol Path

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 9:30am
Si wrote:I'm noticing more bikes on the road with bright lights switched on in the middle of light days. Hope that we don't get to the point where drivers expect all bikes to have bright lights in the middle of the day and thus only look for the light and not the cyclist.
Probably me.
I have a dynamo and can't be bothered turning it on and off. Sorry...

Re: Cycling opportunity Keswick -Kendal

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 9:29am
If they are allowing people to walk through the section, I see no reason why you shouldn't wheel your bike across that bit. The rest of the road (and there are miles of it) is fine- must be if they are allowing buses on it. Cycling the road and walking through the pedestrian bit is exactly the same in safety terms as getting the bus with your bike and wheeling it across the pedestrian bit.

Re: Mysterious Lights on the Bath Bristol Path

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 9:23am
Si wrote:I'm noticing more bikes on the road with bright lights switched on in the middle of light days. Hope that we don't get to the point where drivers expect all bikes to have bright lights in the middle of the day and thus only look for the light and not the cyclist.

I have my lights on in gloomy, overcast weather. Nothing dazzling, though. It's a way of saying "I'm here" to anyone else around. Motorists about to pull out of a side road, pedestrians with dogs, and anyone else who might just glance around and notice that point of light a bit further up the road.

Re: waterproof overgloves

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 January 2016 - 9:02am
Straight away you have created a whooping big leak point if you have an opening. It will let water in.
I find that Sealskins work although eventually some moisture always finds it way down from the wrist.
Membranes are fragile. Eventually all will leak. Test them straight from the box, many have a waterproof fabric but don't have taped seams.

Re: Mysterious Lights on the Bath Bristol Path

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 8:53am
I'm noticing more bikes on the road with bright lights switched on in the middle of light days. Hope that we don't get to the point where drivers expect all bikes to have bright lights in the middle of the day and thus only look for the light and not the cyclist.

Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 January 2016 - 8:51am
the book also offers strange advice on handlebars. It suggests that drops are better for roads but that flats are better if any kind of technical off road is encountered, which is fair enough (my own view is try both and go with what works for you). But on the subject of flats it lords ergon grips but doesn't mention bar-ends. I've got these grips...TBH I don't see what the fuss is about....they certainly don't make up for not having bar ends as you have only one hand position.

Wheel-wise it does point out that 26s are easier to repair in the back of beyond but doesn't really have anything else against 700c/29ers. They do seem to like disc brakes though...which I would have thought negate many of the repairability bonuses of 26s.

And don't even get me started on the author's uninformed views on h*****s

Having said all of this....I still found it a very good book, with lots of inspiring stuff in it and am glad I got it.

Re: What camera?

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 8:36am
Five years after the start of this topic. I would expect products to have advanced significantly.

I haven't bought one yet, but recently a specific purpose has emerged.

The Kodak PIXPRO SP1 has caught my attention. . . . .. What !! never heard of it ???

I can only find it through an Ebay shop in Germany or widely available in the USA.
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Kodak-PIXPRO- ... Swk5FUxnJi

Has anyone got one or heard about it.

Otherwise what is the "sweet-spot" camera, freely-available in the UK ??

Re: Mysterious Lights on the Bath Bristol Path

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 7:16am
I've yet to come across a retina melting flashing daytime running light on a car YMMV

Re: Mysterious Lights on the Bath Bristol Path

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 6:55am
Probably just on a journey that involves both road and track? Don't forget that on the road we need to compete with daytime running lights on most vehicles now...and better lights are making this possible on bikes too.
But, yes, maybe cyclists should be better at flicking them off on tracks and paths.
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