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Re: LLC and Wales Questions

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 24 February 2015 - 1:35pm
mcallaghan wrote:Will keep that in mind.

Here is my tentative gear list at this stage. Am I missing anything (important)?

Gear List:
2 x Bib Shorts
2 x Bike Jersey
3 x Bike Socks
Booties
Rain Jacket
Rain Pants
Arm Warmers
Leg Warmers
Tights
Short Gloves
Rain Gloves
Helmet
Sunglasses
Allen Key Multitool
Tire Lever
Spare Tire
Patch Kit
Bike Pump
First Aid Kit
Sneakers
Lightweight Shorts
MTB Shorts (?)
1 x Jeans (?)
Hiking Pants (?)
3 x T-Shirts
4 x Boxers
3 x Regular Socks
Toiletries
Back Pack
Galaxy Tab S 8.4
Camera + Spare batteries
iPhone
Wallet + Passports
GPS + batteries
Converter + Cables + Rechargers

I would suggest carrying some travel wash and less stuff. 5 pairs of socks for and 4 boxers for an 8 day tour? I did most of the same route (Bristol to Holyhead) last year and took 2 pairs socks and 1 pair of boxers. If you are riding during the day and only wearing them in the evening for say 4 hours a pair of boxers will last two days. Wash them before you go to bed and then hang them up,pegged to your bike next day they will dry as you are riding ready for the following evening. One pair of light-weight trousers that convert to shorts rather than jeans should do it. Tights and leg warmers?
One thing you might want to add if you are staying in some hostels is a travel towel. I also take a cycling cap good if it's cold under your helmet or in the evenings plus good if it's hot. A buff is also very versatile as well.

Re: Another cyclist death: left-turning lorry

CTC Forum - On the road - 24 February 2015 - 1:31pm
Horizon

sorry if I misunderstood your post. It was the reference to the possible use of a "banksman" that confused me. In moving road traffic a banksman would have no role.

Re: Canal towpaths

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 24 February 2015 - 1:28pm
The K&A is indeed very nice. My only comment for the OP would be that if you are "touring" it, you can easily do the whole length in 2-3 days even if you're not strong cyclists. Being a canal it is mostly pretty flat, apart from at Devizes. Depending on how long you intend to take, you might want to extend the trip or plan some side excursions. There are plenty of nearby attractive places to explore - e.g. Bristol (especially Clifton (steep hills) and docks); Bath; Bradford on Avon (steep hills); Savernake Forest; and lots more. I live near the eastern end and am happy to suggest local excursions if you're interested.

Re: Advice sought on choosing a touring bike

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 24 February 2015 - 1:28pm
Paulatic

plenty of good suggestions there. What you can commute on depends on the type of commute you do. I used to commute over 10 miles (each way) including several miles of hilly lanes, and my touring bike was ideal. An mtb would have been harder work on those roads. A racer would not have coped with my panniers. I think touring bikes are as versatile as bikes get.

Re: Another cyclist death: left-turning lorry

CTC Forum - On the road - 24 February 2015 - 1:27pm
pwa wrote:Horizon

the lorry was on the road, not leaving a building site,

pwa: just as a matter of interest, did you think I thought it was? (I can't see the connection.)

Re: Canal towpaths

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 24 February 2015 - 1:26pm
rannochraider wrote:Thanks for the reply Allan. I'll be starting from Glasgow too. It sounds like it'll be just fine for me. Looking forward to giving it a visit.

The path is pretty good as far as Falkirk, with just a few stretches of potentially muddy bits, and these are gradually being surfaced properly. Beyond Falkirk it is not nearly so good and personally I wouldn't do it unless there had been several days of dry weather.

If you want to add a very pretty out-and-back detour, at Kirkintilloch you can change on to the Strathkelvin Railway path to Strathblane, which is very well surfaced and a very pretty ride. There are lovely views of the Campsies and a great cafe at Milton of Campsie, not to mention Big Al's bike shop, Wheelcraft.

Re: Rotterdam > Istanbul - Which bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 24 February 2015 - 1:12pm
Thanks DaveP I had removed the Fuji from my list, mainly because it was a 54cm frame only and I think that will be too big. Glad I did now based on your feedback.

Vorpal, again thanks for this brakes info, I'll look into that if I'm struggling on my practice weekends away. I assume it'll be fine and just something to get used to.

Sweep, thanks for your gearing help, I've now figured out how to calculate gearing (thanks to Vorpal!) so I know what to look for.

Regarding the bike, I might look at extending my budget and try the Genesis Tour De Fer. It's a big step up, but none of the bikes in my current price range seem up to. If I'm considering the bike as a long term purchase. Spending many a happy weekend and tour away then I should get something I know is up to the job straight away and something I'm happy to build up in the future. Spending £500-600 on something I (and you guys) think is 'just ok' isn't really what I want to do.

http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/product ... -de-fer-15

If you know of any other decent bikes in this price range please mention them.
Bearing in mind that Dawes and Ridgeback will be out of the question, based on what I've read around this forum the frame fit won't be right for me.

Re: New Dawes 26"

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 24 February 2015 - 12:54pm
The more I look at the new Dawes range the more I like them. The paint jobs are particularly nice this year I think. If it comes to year end and I get a decent work bonus I may end up replacing my commuter/tourer with one of their higher end models on a discount. I'm liking the look of the Gran Tour at the moment, and it doesn't seem to be that expensive to replace the front wheel with one with a dynamo.

Re: Advice sought on choosing a touring bike

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 24 February 2015 - 12:51pm
Tangled metal

Don't push the button, I get the impression you are a long way off certain what you need. I'll give you my tuppence worth to add to your deliberation/dilemma.
As touring is not in the foreseeable future forget that for now. Commuting and weekend family rides and the trails you mention anything will do it. I've ridden them on Mtb and 25mm road bike with the kids.
For commuting I just would NOT use a new bike. My preference would be for a bike with IHG as they are so much less maintenance. I watched a bike on Ebay , for sale in Carnforth, recently ideal for commuting around £100. At the same time I bought a mtb bike from Garstang for £40. Light steel frame, so light the seller advertised it as alluminium, 15+years old and like new. Probably done 10mls around the town. Once again an ideal commuter.
So I would hang onto your money until you are 110% certain you want and need a tourer. And you've looked at and quizzed the attributes of individual bikes and are certain what you think is worthwhile.

Re: Another cyclist death: left-turning lorry

CTC Forum - On the road - 24 February 2015 - 12:45pm
Horizon

the lorry was on the road, not leaving a building site, and from witness reports it seems to have been in motion when the cyclist tried to overtake on the left between the lorry and a hoarding. The lorry appears to have been indicating left and in the process of turning before the young lady began passing on the left.

Re: Another cyclist death: left-turning lorry

CTC Forum - On the road - 24 February 2015 - 12:41pm
beardy wrote:If the HGV was stuck in a line of traffic that was going nowhere, also OK.

However each passing of a HGV was a deliberate, planned act, not just a matter of sailing along the inside of the traffic.I was in my car earlier this morning. I was stuck in a queue of traffic - not moving. HGV in front, HGV behind me. This was at 08:30 - there must have been four or five cyclists go past on the inside - no one batted an eyelid (well, I didn't - not sure about anyone else as I couldn't see them as there was a blummin' great lorry in front and one behind me.)

In this instance it was a single carriageway road but on the lane I was in there was a natural gap down the side of the traffic. It was near a school. The biggest danger in this instance were the teenage school children on the pavement - far less predictable than two 20 tonne plus vehicles. As mentioned above though, the passing of each HGV is a deliberate act and needs consideration. For example, one needs to get into primary before the junction that is causing the hold up (or use the ASL box - I don't). After the junction though, there is insufficient space to pass anything on the left - so that would be dangerous. Basically, sometimes it's safe - sometimes it isn't.

Re: Another cyclist death: left-turning lorry

CTC Forum - On the road - 24 February 2015 - 12:36pm
Any answers?

Was the lorry involved in the accident articulated?
If so, does it take a different path when turning from a non-articulated lorry?
If so, does that make it more dangerous than a non-articulated lorry?
If so, could non-articulated lorries be used?
Does the size of the lorry matter?
If so, could the delivery have been made in a smaller lorry?
Would having a banksman/assistant have made a difference?
If so, why didn't the lorry have one?
Could the driver have seen the cyclist had he looked?
If not, why did he attempt the manouvre without asking for assistance?
If he could have and didn't look, why didn't he?

Re: Another cyclist death: left-turning lorry

CTC Forum - On the road - 24 February 2015 - 11:51am
pwa wrote:I'd like to raise a point for discussion. If, as I believe, trying to overtake a lorry on the left (while you are sharing the same lane) is inherently dangerous, is it possible to get around London on a bike without doing this? I'm not talking about lorries trying to overtake bikes, then squeezing them against the edge of the road. That is another issue. My feeling is that if passing on the left (whilst in the same lane) is hazardous, and if people cannot get around on a bike without doing it I would say cycling in London is, for me, too risky to contemplate. At least until infrastructure changes sufficiently.
Possible? Yes. However, it will make some of the most obvious routes so slow that you may as well be walking. That's pretty much been my approach to Bressenden Place where this incident happened: I've walked around it at least once and I think I've used a relatively lengthy detour along Palace Street to avoid it at least twice. It's a bit of a nuisance because it is an obvious route south from Buckingham Palace and it's labelled on Google as a "Bicycle Friendly Road" which certainly isn't true at the minute. However, the usually-great http://cycle.travel/map won't send you that way today unless you really force it.

I'd say London is OK for riding, but check the route beforehand, try to spot useful infrastructure (even if it's only bus lanes) and landmarks and know where the blackspots to try to avoid are (I hate Holborn gyratory, for example, but I will ride around Trafalgar Square if I'm feeling confident enough). Put a route into a bicycle satnav and use it (you'll need the screen on or an earpiece in most of London, though!). Basically do pretty much as I think you should when driving a car or van into London... but at least with a bike, you can ask other road users (I do that a fair bit, especially where roadworks have changed the layout - I still get lost every time I try to cross Islington Upper Street, though) and jump off onto a refuge or footway if needed, which aren't good options if it all goes wrong in a van!

Re: Another cyclist death: left-turning lorry

CTC Forum - On the road - 24 February 2015 - 11:36am
Back in the days when I did such things, I would undertake HGVs so long as I had a plan and an escape route. So if there were railings to be crushed against then I would not do it. However if there was a pavement and I had enough room between myself and the HGV that I could get on it in time then OK.

If the HGV was stuck in a line of traffic that was going nowhere, also OK.

However each passing of a HGV was a deliberate, planned act, not just a matter of sailing along the inside of the traffic.

Re: Another cyclist death: left-turning lorry

CTC Forum - On the road - 24 February 2015 - 11:26am
Vorpal

your comments sum up my feelings on this matter.

I'd like to raise a point for discussion. If, as I believe, trying to overtake a lorry on the left (while you are sharing the same lane) is inherently dangerous, is it possible to get around London on a bike without doing this? I'm not talking about lorries trying to overtake bikes, then squeezing them against the edge of the road. That is another issue. My feeling is that if passing on the left (whilst in the same lane) is hazardous, and if people cannot get around on a bike without doing it I would say cycling in London is, for me, too risky to contemplate. At least until infrastructure changes sufficiently.

Thoughts?

Re: Telford Town Centre Revamp

CTC Forum - On the road - 24 February 2015 - 10:57am
Telford is still an awful place to get about by cycle. Cycle-ways that are not continuous mean lots of road use and criss-crossing to complete a route. Very poor surfaces are common and many of the Town Park paths are a mess, literally, considering the amount spent on supposed improvements. Negotiating some of the paths through housing areas is hazardous too, with rubbish (boxes, old furniture and syringes etc.) common place. Don't try cycling to any of the supermarkets either, the routes are so torturous it's quicker to walk.

Fortunately, the Newport to Stafford cycle-way (former railway line) is now complete and the surface throughout the 15 miles is easy for most types of bike.

Orange / Vaucluse / Luberon - ideas?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 24 February 2015 - 10:31am
Hi

I've just plunged in and booked myself, my missus and my daughter (16) on the Bike Express coach to Orange for late August. Yes, I know its quieter at other times of year, but late August it has to be. We have a touring background and my wife speaks fluent French, so all should go well. We will be cycle camping.

Does anyone have any route suggestions for the Vaucluse. I know about Mont Ventoux, but the area to the east of Orange is a wonderful maze of minor roads and lumpy landscape. I would welcome any info on specific bits of road so that I can patch together an interesting route. We have about 2 weeks but mileage will be a modest 30 miles a day to avoid mentally scarring my family.

Ta.

Pete W

Re: Shane goes lightweight :)

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 24 February 2015 - 10:09am
gplhl wrote:
Me too Shane, would like to see your full kit list for this one?

Looking to lighten up (load not mood) in just over a couple of months time when I set off from the UK again.

My rig I'm on now is over 50kg excluding liquids (water/fuel for stove etc.)



How much? Maybe my 25kg (inc bike) is on the light end of things but i can't imagine toking around twice the weight!

Re: Shane goes lightweight :)

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 24 February 2015 - 10:02am
Shane
Thanks for the thread and the links,looks like it was good trip
Photos are great!

Re: Canal towpaths

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 24 February 2015 - 9:07am
Hiya Jim, I can't comment on the Union Canal from Falkirk to Edinburgh as I haven't done it, though I can't imagine it being any worse than the Forth and Clyde. I pedal along the canal from Glasgow and find the path surface is pretty good for the entire route. I am on a tourer with 700/32 and have no worries whatsoever. Its mostly tarmac; either smooth or with a fine gravel on top. A few stretches, generally out of towns, are unsurfaced, but hard-packed....not a surface I would hit at 30mph on racing skinnies, but acceptable with a wee bit of care......a wee bit of care is required under some bridges, mainly due to the narrowness, but hey....its a towpath!
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