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Re: Lights: flashing, bright: article in Cycle

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 October 2014 - 12:57pm
mjr wrote:Flinders wrote:Pedal reflectors are fine, but my pedals don't take them. So perhaps anklets that are reflective, or have lights, would be a decent substitute if the law were to catch up with modern bike design.
I think if your pedals don't take reflectors (why isn't this part of the purchasing decision?) then if you wear yellow ankle bands of some sort, you'll all the benefit of looking pedally and almost no-one will remark upon it.

It isn't a question of whether it's part of the decision or not in my case, as I don't commute any more by bike and choose my riding times so as not to ride in the dark. I've only used lights once this last year, and that was for a very early morning start just after dawn when it was light but a bit murky, so I wanted a bit more visibility. I don't think pedal reflectors are actually much use on clipless pedals, you just wouldn't see them on mine most of the time even if they were there due to the position of my foot; I used to have them on my old clip-and-strap ones when I commuted. Anklets would be much more visible. (So I got some that are reflective and have little flashing lights at the recent Aldi sale, just in case I ever need to go out in the dark My shoes/bags have reflective bits too.)

However, as this has got me thinking about it, I've just had a search, and there do seem to be some reflectors you can get for clipless pedals. Not sure if they'd fit mine. Next time I'm in the LBS I'll ask.

Re: Lights: flashing, bright: article in Cycle

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 October 2014 - 12:17pm
Only if Halfords and others stop selling headlight bulbs that are 40% brighter etc and manufacturers remove LED headlights which seem to produce much more glare even when they are dipped. And finally 'to advocate' is not the same as 'to instruct'.

Re: Lights: flashing, bright: article in Cycle

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 October 2014 - 11:47am
freeflow wrote:The theory of the tragedy of the commons isnt either an excuse for, or a call for, a race to the bottom.

I thought that was the whole point of TOC. It explains why, without appropriate governance, its always a race to the bottom/worst case. The use of the term 'Tradgedy' is quite deliberate as it described the inevitable remorseless of the process.
That is what it means, but that is not the same as instructing people to race to the bottom as fast as possible!

Re: New bike for commuting

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 October 2014 - 11:37am
The cheapest Boardman CX bike is worth a look. Has the ability to fit mudguards anda rack if needed, and it's just within your budget at £599.99 with a Sora groupset and disk brakes:

http://www.halfords.com/cycling/bikes/r ... wgodGgcAfw

Re: Lights: flashing, bright: article in Cycle

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 October 2014 - 11:32am
The theory of the tragedy of the commons isnt either an excuse for, or a call for, a race to the bottom.

I thought that was the whole point of TOC. It explains why, without appropriate governance, its always a race to the bottom/worst case. The use of the term 'Tradgedy' is quite deliberate as it described the inevitable remorseless of the process.

Re: Have you been knocked OFF in a collision while cycling?

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 October 2014 - 11:21am
beardy wrote:You can not let me off the hook that easily, we both felt it was our own fault rather than the other person's fault. However I think it was possibly not significant enough an accident to be in with the others, it was more of a "cleat moment" type severity.
Well, I've goofed and put no "yes, came off, fault shared with other non-motorised user" option. It doesn't matter too much for my purposes, I think.

On the severity, that's your call and I'm happy with whatever you decide. Thanks for giving it some thought.

Re: A warm dry winter?

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 October 2014 - 10:33am
the bbc television forecast often has a rider saying "we're not sure so far ahead as 5 day's time" then the website tries to predict up to a month ahead etc. vague 'forecasts' i know but they've no idea!!
winter in britain - dry and cold if the position of the jetstream pulls in air from the east. wet and windy if the position pushes systems from across the atlantic over the top of us.
i've got my studded tyres ready-ish in the shed but they rarely see much serious action.

Re: Clipping and running

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 October 2014 - 10:21am
I was out riding in a similar style ride to that yesterday. I was sometimes thinking about that film clip as the positions changed (in that sort of fluidity you get in informal groups like Audax compared to race pelotons), sometimes I was the guy behind and sometimes the guy infront. In every situation I would have thought the guy in front was wrong, when I was in his position I waited for a gap and that meant waiting for the normal flow to create a space or asking for one. When I was behind I would have seen what the guy infront did as causing the accident. There is one proviso though, if there was something on the road that made the guy in front have to make that move as an emergency action, pothole etc.

Though we have hit potholes in formation before and always the people I ride with have hit the pothole rather than sideswipe their companions. Not that they had much chance to make any decision.

Re: Have you been knocked OFF in a collision while cycling?

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 October 2014 - 10:20am
When I was about 10 or 11 years old, I hit a parked car whilst cycling with a friend. That's the only collision I can recall ever having with a motor vehicle. I have never come off as the result of a collision. I did have an off when I was a teenager when the driver of a motor vehicle forced me off the road. I did not have any physical contact with the vehicle, but it was my belief that the driver deliberately forced me off the road, or at the least meant to intimidate me.

I have had several *very* near misses, and have been forced off the road by a motor vehicle twice (including the incident noted above). Those have all been the fault of the motor vehicle driver, although in a couple of cases, I probably could have prevented them or at least made them less likely, through my own actions.

Re: Dry bags - a lightweight alternative to panniers

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 October 2014 - 10:14am
I use a large one folded over on the rear rack for touring if the trip involves train travel. I have front panniers as well.
When I'm getting on a train the dry bag is big enough to take all my kit including the panniers.
Because the dry bag has a strap I can have it on my back which leaves my hands free for the unladen bike.
I find this easier when getting into continental train where there are steps to climb.
Never tried it with camping gear- I suppose it depends how much you are carrying.

Re: Clipping and running

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 October 2014 - 10:13am
Tonyf33 wrote:Please explain why in the context of the rules this is 100% the guy in fronts fault?
the guy stuck his arm out AND gave an auidble warning of his intention, and yes that doesn't give him priority and yes he moved over without checking over his shoulder.

That said the chap behind ignored his signal in reality, did not brake, did not adjust his own position & did NOT give him enough space when there WAS ample time (he stopped pedalling if you look), two wrongs don't make a right.
What if the guy in front had hit an obstacle or had to swiftly swerve to avoid something..what then?
the rider behind had ample opportunity to brake and move to the inside..50/50 if you ask me

Nah not 50 50 at all 100% the guy making the move. The general rule on the road is that you and you alone are responsible for making sure it's safe to perform a move. The other guy has no responsibility to facilitate it. Leaving a gap etc is polite but that's all it is, the guy behind has no more responsibility than to hold his line at a constant speed.

If the guy in making the move cannot find a gap he can ease off, let those guys go and *then* make his move across.

This would have been the same if it was cars on the motorway or whatever.

TL;Dr the guy behind is blameless and would be within his rights to sue for personal injury, it's that clear cut.

Re: Have you been knocked OFF in a collision while cycling?

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 October 2014 - 10:10am
mjr wrote:beardy wrote:That is the only thing that has bought me off, both of us thought it was our own fault which was rather handy in not leaving us feeling bitter towards the other.
I'd like that sort of thing as "Yes, came off, other road user fault" please. Thanks.

You can not let me off the hook that easily, we both felt it was our own fault rather than the other person's fault. However I think it was possibly not significant enough an accident to be in with the others, it was more of a "cleat moment" type severity.

Re: Clipping and running

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 October 2014 - 10:09am
Very similar maneuver to the cars you can see on the motorways now and again, they start the maneuver then indicate. One of my pet hates. OK, he does indicate first then move, but the time gap is so small I would not expect anyone to react that quickly. Definitely the fault of the guy in front, you've got to make sure it's safe to move before making the move...

Re: Have you been knocked OFF in a collision while cycling?

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 October 2014 - 10:02am
I've only once been knocked off and that was when I was "track standing " while pedestrians were walking over a zebra crossing. My rear wheel was hit by a motorbike. The motorbike was sliding along the ground - the rider having lost control after braking at the last minute. Apparently he hadn't noticed me or the pedestrians in time
I wasn't hurt and my bike was undamaged.
I've had a few falls in group riding though

Re: Have you been knocked OFF in a collision while cycling?

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 October 2014 - 9:58am
Over 40 odd years I could probably answer all of the above. Worst accident I have had though was from a wheel touch whilst cycling in a group, end up in hospital having 2 of my fingers pinned back on. Fortunately all incindents with cars I have managed to either not come off or land well, and walk away .


.

Re: Clipping and running

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 October 2014 - 9:55am
I agree, the onus is always on the person making the manoeuver to make sure the way is clear so the issue of fault is pretty clear cut. Of course there is always courtesy. The cyclist behind had time to slow and allow the cyclist much more space to fit in. It is what I would have done in the situation in the video and on a motorway when faced with somebody wishing to pull into my lane

Re: Berlin to Copenhagen

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 October 2014 - 9:20am
You could just get a plane back - sure that'd be cheaper and certainly quicker than your train/ferry option - especially with folding bikes making it easier.

Re: Dry bags - a lightweight alternative to panniers

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 October 2014 - 9:13am
on the compression issue the thing that springs to mind is tent poles but i also often buy stuff on my trips - books, mugs etc and carry maps and so on - fine in a pannier - even my ultra lights but i'd be very wary if i was strapping in the way mentioned.

I'm a bit OCD about how the bike looks too so the messy look upsets me

Re: Dry bags - a lightweight alternative to panniers

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 October 2014 - 9:08am
These particular Alpkit bags have reinforced strap "mounts" on the side that you thread the straps through.
So in theory you do not even need the strap around the bag. I have hung one of the single strap Airlocks off the back of my seat as a lightweight saddlebag before. Lightweight but not worth it normally because of the slight hassle of getting things in and out being more influential than the weight loss.
No nice little sidepockets either.

Re: Dry bags - a lightweight alternative to panniers

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 October 2014 - 9:01am
Just lying in my hotel room, waiting for the typhoon to pass. So I can think what I wouldn't want squashed in my panniers.

Food, shampoo, tubes eg toothpaste, packets of pills/medicines, computer tablet, etc. Plus all sorts of things that could get bent or broken by being put under pressure from a strap. (I am assuming the straps have to be pulled very tight.)
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