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Re: Another cyclist killed by lorry in London

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 1:29pm
Flinders

At least neither of us have to bother with paying for a new photo licence every 10 years!
I get a few odd looks when I am asked for my licence and I pull out my dog eared, almost falling apart licence.
I have to be careful to refold correctly or it will disintegrate.

Mark

Re: How much rubbish is too much

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 1:17pm
When I used to live in France and drive back to the UK I was always astonished by the quantity of rubbish along UK main roads.

Some time ago I walked to my local Post Office (1 mile country roads) and was disgusted by the rubbish in the verges; so I asked the PO for a few carrier bags and over that mile home on single track country roads filled 3 carrier bags with rubbish (and gave up before getting home when all 3 bags were full).

And out riding I see loads of rubbish discarded along the roads. No idea of the source but we do seem to be a nation of litter louts.

Ian

Re: Another cyclist killed by lorry in London

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 1:16pm
SleepyJoe wrote:I have a paper licence as I haven't moved house in a while and I passed my test in 1983 and I passed in a Ford Fiesta type car
This allows me to still drive a category C1 lorry (3 1/2 tonne unladed, 7 1/2 tonne max weight) which I have done a couple of times
Not so bad around decent roads as long as you use our wing mirrors and steer later than normal.
The really scary option, is that I also have C1E which is a 3 1/2 tonne lorry towing a trailer with a maximum weight of 12 tonnes!
I haven't tried this and don't really want to either!
That is a huge difference from a 3 door hatchback
Mark

I think mine's the same, and I wouldn't want to drive anything that size either, not without a bit of instruction of some sort.
Never having had the need for it to be 'sent in', my licence doesn't even have a photo, which was a pain when I didn't have a currently valid passport, as I had no photo ID at all... These days, you have to have photo ID for so many things.

Re: Hello and a question about cycle path etiquette

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 1:09pm
Well, anecdotally, the only time I have been hit (brushed) by a bike while walking on a cyclepath was by someone coming in the opposite direction. (& I was on the left)

Re: Cycle Touring in the Outer Hebrides - Questions

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 June 2014 - 12:55pm
Almost forgot. The Skoon Art Cafe is well worth a visit if you are anywhere near (it is on the golden road Harris).

Re: Cycle Touring in the Outer Hebrides - Questions

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 June 2014 - 12:46pm
jamesgilbert wrote:One return option is to get the ferry from Tarbert to Uig (on Skye) then cycle across Skye to Armadale and the very short ferry crossing to Mallaig.

There's a direct (and very scenic) train from Mallaig to Glasgow.

Skye is busier than the Outer Hebrides but the scenery is stunning.

+1

Re: Another cyclist killed by lorry in London

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 12:44pm
FWIW, my driving licence issued in 1978 (test passed in 1965) Is for groups

A: Any motor vehicle other than: a road roller, vehicle steered by its tracks, invalid carriage, trolley vehicle.

D Any motor bicycle, with or without sidecar

E Moped.

A footnote explains that "You must obtain an additional licence before driving a heavy goods vehicle or a public service vehicle."

There must be plenty more with similar entitlements about.

Re: Cycle Touring in the Outer Hebrides - Questions

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 June 2014 - 12:41pm
One return option is to get the ferry from Tarbert to Uig (on Skye) then cycle across Skye to Armadale and the very short ferry crossing to Mallaig.

There's a direct (and very scenic) train from Mallaig to Glasgow.

Skye is busier than the Outer Hebrides but the scenery is stunning.

Re: Cycle Touring in the Outer Hebrides - Questions

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 June 2014 - 12:38pm
A few tips:
* when travelling through south Uist try and get off the main road. It heads up the centre of the island which means you don't see some of the more interesting parts, there are various small tracks/roads that will let you explore the west coast, try some of them.
* Don't rush up through the Uists, try and enjoy them, a lot of people ride the length of those islands in a day, I think they are missing out.
* Make sure you spend some time exploring Berneray, it is a real gem of a place, not just the place to catch the ferry to Harris.
* Harris is tricky, the west coast has fantastic beaches, the road on the east coast (the golden road), is a wonderful road to ride (though hilly), if you can try and do both, oh and then there is the ride out to Hushinis/Huisinis.
* Than camp site at Lickisto has some great pitches and a nice Blackhouse/common room you can use to escape the midges and meet others if you want some company!
* The Gatliff trust hostels are basic but can be great fun, they are all in fantastic locations and a way to escape the weather if you need it.
* It can be very, very windy on those islands, think about what tent you want to take, I spent the night on Barra wondering if my Terra Nova mountain tent was up to the job it was, but not everyone is so lucky!
* If the weather is good then the Hebrides is a fantastic place to cycle, if it is bad it can be really hard work (a few years ago I rescued a couple that had been blown into a ditch on Lewis, we managed to squeeze their bikes into our hired minibus). Some days it is best to just sit out the weather.
* Make the most of the CalMac ferries they can make the journey part of the adventure (and they are very cheap if you are on foot/with a bike)!
* Only go to these islands if you are prepared for the consequences. For some of us they get deep under the skin. If this happens to you, then you may find yourself heading north far more often then you expected and become an island bore (guilty as charged). You may even be tempted to go and live there (looking at you you tigger!).

In terms of a route, a couple of years back I returned from Harris via Skye, Mallaig, Moidart, Ardnamurchan, Mull and then back to Oban. I found this a really enjoyable route. You could easily wake up in the tent on Mull and be on the train home in the same day. See https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/?o= ... 10600&v=90 for more detail then you probably want.

Have fun, I'd be envious except I'm off to North Uist in two weeks time (like I said it gets under your skin).

Andy

One night in the Welsh Hills

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 June 2014 - 12:33pm
I went to a wedding outside Liverpool, a long way from my home on the south coast. A ride in the welsh hills with a tent seemed like the perfect way to break up the journey home.

http://www.farawayvisions.com/polka-dot-microadventure/

Re: Another cyclist killed by lorry in London

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 12:32pm
I have a paper licence as I haven't moved house in a while and I passed my test in 1983 and I passed in a Ford Fiesta type car
This allows me to still drive a category C1 lorry (3 1/2 tonne unladed, 7 1/2 tonne max weight) which I have done a couple of times
Not so bad around decent roads as long as you use our wing mirrors and steer later than normal.
The really scary option, is that I also have C1E which is a 3 1/2 tonne lorry towing a trailer with a maximum weight of 12 tonnes!
I haven't tried this and don't really want to either!
That is a huge difference from a 3 door hatchback
Mark

Re: How much rubbish is too much

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 12:28pm
Take nothing but photographs, leave nothing but footprints, or in our case wheel tracks.

Neil

Re: How much rubbish is too much

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 12:21pm
and crime.

Re: Hello and a question about cycle path etiquette

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 12:17pm
Mark1978 wrote:at slower speed until its safe to overtake. Imagine if you were cycling the wrong way on the road if you meet oncoming traffic most of the time you'd have no option other than for both parties to have to stop.
And yet it works well for pedestrians on the road. Could this be because a cyclist's speed is significant whereas a pedestrian's isn't?

Re: Hello and a question about cycle path etiquette

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 12:13pm
Ellieb wrote:I agree that the reason why pedestrians should walk on the right is for safety. The person on foot shouldn't need to step out of the road, but if a car is about to hit them, they can see it and take evasive action. The point is on a cycle path if a pedestrian is walking the same way as the cyclist, the cyclist can cycle at walking pace until they are able to overtake. If the Ped is walking towards the cyclist, what is going to happen? In my experience the cyclist stops and the Ped steps into the path of the bloke coming the other way. If you are both going in opposite directions there is going to come a point when you are going to meet head on & then have to avoid each other, going in the same way both parties can keep going until it is safe to overtake.Can you really ride for any length of time behind a pedestrian at their 2mph? I think I'd be weaving all over the path or falling off In reality it rarely happens that i'm stuck behind a pedestrian for any length of time but if it did happen I think i'd prefer to dismount than try to maintain balance. Of course pedestrians may do silly things but if we cyclists take the appropriate amount of care I can't see any harm coming (the other bloke in your example should have seen that coming a mile off). As a cyclist I am happy to take on the extra responsibility for the danger I present to pedestrians by slowing, anticipating and accepting their occasionally daft movements. As a pedestrian I prefer not to entrust my safety entirely to the unknown competence of a cyclist coming up behind. If pedestrians keep right two people have to make mistakes for anyone to come to harm, if pedestrians keep left it only needs the cyclist.
Brummoi wrote:I thought that walking on the right down pathless roads was mainly used at night time so your torch light would be picked up by the on coming vehicle.
As far as I am aware the practice has always been for all times of day and long predates any belief that pedestrians should be carrying torches (60 years ago bike lights were controversial, the idea that someone should carry a lamp to walk on the road would have seemed ridiculous)

Re: Hello and a question about cycle path etiquette

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 12:06pm
Ellieb wrote:I agree that the reason why pedestrians should walk on the right is for safety. The person on foot shouldn't need to step out of the road, but if a car is about to hit them, they can see it and take evasive action. The point is on a cycle path if a pedestrian is walking the same way as the cyclist, the cyclist can cycle at walking pace until they are able to overtake. If the Ped is walking towards the cyclist, what is going to happen? In my experience the cyclist stops and the Ped steps into the path of the bloke coming the other way. If you are both going in opposite directions there is going to come a point when you are going to meet head on & then have to avoid each other, going in the same way both parties can keep going until it is safe to overtake.

Thanks, that was my point. It's the same when a car meets a cyclist on the road, they can stay behind them for a while at slower speed until its safe to overtake. Imagine if you were cycling the wrong way on the road if you meet oncoming traffic most of the time you'd have no option other than for both parties to have to stop.

Re: Cycle Touring in the Outer Hebrides - Questions

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 June 2014 - 12:02pm
Also, if it helps, the dates I am looking at are : 22nd July to 29th July.

Thanks

Re: Cycle Touring in the Outer Hebrides - Questions

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 June 2014 - 12:01pm
Thanks for all the insightful responses as always. To explain a bit more on the bike, I recently toured the Transam on the same bike, so hopefully this should be fine for this! I was a little concerned the route may have gone off road, but I was always have the option of locking the bike off and having a little wander if I do fancy hiking off for the day? While I was in the US I didn't have any issues with leaving my bike about, I would assume the same for the Hebrides?

So, here's what I'm planning so far:

1. Train it from Euston to Glasgow (£70 return) which seems reasonable for the season.
2. Train it from Glasgow to Oban and spend a day here.
3. Get the ferry over first thing and start making my way north! I probably won't plan this portion, as from what you guys have said the route seems fairly easy to plot and wild camping will definitely be my option. Any more suggestions with regards to beaches or stop offs I have to visit will be much appreciated.
4. This is WHERE I COULD USE SOME HELP - what would be the best (price, worthy detours, time etc...) place to venture back to the mainland from? Stornoway? Detour to Skye? I can't seem to find a simple way to get back to Glasgow. Ideally, I would like to wake up in the tent one morning and be able to get back to Glasgow by the early evening to hop on the train back to London.

Sorry for the scatter gun of questions, but ideally I'd love to get this booked up ASAP, so again, thanks in advance and look forward to further suggestions

Max

Re: Hello and a question about cycle path etiquette

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 11:49am
I thought that walking on the right down pathless roads was mainly used at night time so your torch light would be picked up by the on coming vehicle.

Re: Hello and a question about cycle path etiquette

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 11:40am
I agree that the reason why pedestrians should walk on the right is for safety. The person on foot shouldn't need to step out of the road, but if a car is about to hit them, they can see it and take evasive action. The point is on a cycle path if a pedestrian is walking the same way as the cyclist, the cyclist can cycle at walking pace until they are able to overtake. If the Ped is walking towards the cyclist, what is going to happen? In my experience the cyclist stops and the Ped steps into the path of the bloke coming the other way. If you are both going in opposite directions there is going to come a point when you are going to meet head on & then have to avoid each other, going in the same way both parties can keep going until it is safe to overtake.
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