Feed aggregator

Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 January 2016 - 8:11pm
pwa wrote:I'm a bit surprised that you didn't find drops good on Alpine roads. That is where I find them best. The idea of undertaking a ten mile climb with straight bars is not appealing. For me the hands on hoods position is perfect for climbing, just shifting my hands around occasionally to avoid discomfort. I find straights, even with bar ends, have no good climbing position.
I've never had a problem climbing on a mountain bike. The clue is in the name surely. The straight bars are better for climbing because you need more control (due to lack of forward momentum) and better for descents because you need more control and stronger braking. The comfort side is subjective and personally I don't think there's much in it but surely it's an objective fact that straight bars have more steering power. That matters when you're carrying heavy loads on mountains.

Re: Eurostar South of France Trains Bike Policy

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 January 2016 - 7:55pm
BrianFox wrote:Much as I would far rather use the train, for me the inescapable conclusion is that it is *much* easier to fly. The possibility of being separated from bike is just too high.
Really? Which airlines let you wheel your bike on?

My next international trip taking the bike will be by ferry - booked during the uncertainty a few months ago. And I hate boats. Damn you, Eurostar!

Re: Eurostar South of France Trains Bike Policy

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 January 2016 - 7:52pm
BrianFox wrote:Much as I would far rather use the train, for me the inescapable conclusion is that it is *much* easier to fly. The possibility of being separated from bike is just too high.

I could think of lots of reasons why you might not want to take the train, instead of flying, but the risk of being separated from your bike isn't obviously one of them. Yes there's a risk the eurodispatch guys might put your bike on the wrong train, but in comparison with the risk of your bike being lost or damaged by airport baggage handlers, the risks on eurostar — one company with three destinations — must be smaller. Ditto sending it with their euroluggage service (or whatever it's called). While taking it in a bag on the TGV isn't by any means guaranteed problem-free, the chances of you yourself putting it on the wrong train must be pretty slim.

Re: Vanmoof Boncho - reinventing the cape

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 January 2016 - 7:52pm
LollyKat wrote:The main problem for many folk in this country, I think, is that it will obscure front lights mounted on the handlebars.
Fork-crown mounts exist for some lights and I think there's a bar-like adapter available too, to allow any handlebar mount to be used.

I used to use a cape. I had to wear waterproof trousers too, else I just got splashed from underneath (from my wheels or others nearby). It didn't really behave well in the wind and it was a heck of a lot of wet cape to hang up when I got to my destination. A jacket and rainlegs is much more acceptable IMO.

I still wear a hood when cycling in the rain. It doesn't usually impede hearing (it's thin) or visibility (my cycling glasses push it back if I turn my head) unless it's very tail-windy (and how often does that happen? ) and then it's usually quite easy to flip the hood down to get through a difficult junction and pull it back up after.

Re: Most Annoying and Potentially Dangerous Motoring Manoeuv

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 January 2016 - 7:45pm
Mark1978 wrote:Quite simply the looking straight at you at a junction and then pulling out anyway. People do that to me all the time, on the bike and in the car. So much so that I'm pretty much expecting them to do it.
^^ This. It really does incentivise me not to fix my currently-screeching front brake.

But an honourable mention for undertaking a vehicle waiting to turn right by swerving left into a mandatory cycle or cycle/bus lane (or even mounting a kerb onto a cycle track sometimes) without looking.

Re: Sleeping in the Netherlands

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 January 2016 - 7:14pm
YHA cards accepted.

Sorry if I wasn't being clear re Stayokay. They certainly do take families. And have a variety of room sizes so its feasible that you could occupy a whole room with the under sixteens ( in a 2/4/6 bedded room) . In Arnhem occupying a whole private room is cheaper than the equivalent sized general dorm.

eg Arnhem has these room sizes:
http://www.stayokay.com/en/hostel/arnhem

Re: Cuba: - You’ll love it or hate it

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 January 2016 - 6:34pm
I used the Viazul foriegners buses 4 times. They took a bike each time with no problem.

You book your bike in at the bus station and pay for it there. I never paid the driver and they just accepted the bikes. Officially, there is a set fee for a bike, it is a % of your ticket. Twice I was charged correctly, once no charge as they didn't have change and from Santiago to Baracoa I was charged a local set fee which was substantially above what it should have been. No doubt the staff pocketed the difference.

A bus with bike from Vinales to Habana should be no problem, I did it. Book your ticket in the office a day or so before and mention your bike.

The west of Cuba around Vinales and Pinar del Rio is very different from the rest of the country. I only spent about 5 days cycling there on an indirect route from Habana. You can go a bit further, but remember you are tied to where there is accomodation. if you have 4 weeks then you will need to research other areas.

Re: Sleeping in the Netherlands

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 January 2016 - 6:23pm
Try Amsterdam Woods campsite, they have a range of cabins to hire. It's accessible to the city centre by bike or tram, in reach of Haarlem by bike and there's an organic goat dairy just down the lane in the woods too.

Re: Cuba: - You’ll love it or hate it

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 January 2016 - 6:15pm
I booked the Viazul from Havana to Holguin (12 hours overnight) and back to Havana from Bayamo (14 hours leaving Bayamo at 02:50) Regular stops approximately every 2 hours and ice cold air con) Bring something warm. Two food stops of about 20 mins along the route, other stops are long enough to stretch your legs and have a toilet break. Cost $44 CUC each way per person plus 6CUC per bike. Book several days in advance at Viazul stations anywhere or online before you go. There is no personal arrangement with the driver. You pay for the bike luggage when you check-in which is an hour before the bus is due to leave and pay. You get a luggage tag and a receipt for your bike and you get your bike back off the bus when you show your receipt to the driver when you get off. Very organised indeed. No manic grabbing of luggage by all and sundry.
You must remove your front wheel and seat before the bike gets packed on the bus.

Re: Sleeping in the Netherlands

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 January 2016 - 5:57pm
Thanks for your advice, both of you. Not too keen on the camping because I am such a nimby pimby when it comes to loading up my bike. We shall have three under sixteens so the hostel route might be closed. I was banking on being able to use YHA membership to use in Holland.
Back to drawing board. Thanks for replying.

Re: Most Annoying and Potentially Dangerous Motoring Manoeuv

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 January 2016 - 5:24pm
For me its the driver that suddenly decides to do a U-turn either for the hell of it or because they've got impatient waiting in a queue. London cabs are notorious for doing it usually with an arm out of the drivers window to tell people they haven't looked out for them.

Re: Most Annoying and Potentially Dangerous Motoring Manoeuv

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 January 2016 - 5:19pm
How about the door opening trap? Which they do to cyclists, but not HGV's.

Re: Coventry and Kenilworth

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 January 2016 - 5:13pm
How long ago? I'll pack some flotation devices

Re: Most Annoying and Potentially Dangerous Motoring Manoeuv

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 January 2016 - 5:13pm
Driver getting into car. The dangers from motor vehicles increase exponentially after this initial manoeuvre has been completed .

Re: The Plug iii -any views...and will it fit a 1" steerer?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 January 2016 - 4:53pm
Fc101, thank you for a very thorough response. The literature I've read suggests that the Plug will charge at a rate equivalent to charging from a USB wall socket when travelling speed reaches 7.5mph compared to the Reactor which needs a speed of 9mph. However, given everything you've said in favour of the Reactor over the Plug I'm going to go with the Reactor. I'm not intending to install dynamo lighting at the moment. I have USB chargeable Cateye lights and I'll see how I get on charging them using the Reactor. I don't use lights a huge amount when touring, unless it is a very wet day or I'm riding briefly into the evening.

Thanks again,

David

Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 January 2016 - 4:53pm
willem jongman wrote:I use drop bars on a gravel grinder with wide and fast 26 inch tyres. I think it is perfect for anything short of truly demanding off road riding. But for that I would want suspension as well. So my bike handles tarmac, gravel roads and forest trails with ease, and I think it is the perfect compromise for tours in Europe. I normally take only rear panniers, but on a recent trip combining business with pleasure I also had to take front panniers, and that was fine too (other than heavier). Brakes are Magura HS66 hydraulic rim brakes and they are powerful enough. V brakes with the Tektro v brake levers for drop bars are also fine, according to friends who have used them (but only with bar end or downtube shifters, of course). In short, there is sweet spot in between the two styles of tractor bikes and traditional British tourers.

Is this because of the smaller wheel size or the bike's ability to take much larger tyre?

Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 January 2016 - 4:38pm
reohn2 wrote:al_yrpal wrote:My steel Salsa Vaya begins to struggle with a touring load and camping gear on the road
Have you fitted a decent steel Tubus rack on it yet?



I'll second that. A lot of wobbling and flexing frames are actually just a rack swinging back and forth - something I discovered early on in our business when following customers. Some frames can tank-slap with a flexi rack but feel just fine with something really solid.

Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 January 2016 - 4:28pm
al_yrpal wrote:My steel Salsa Vaya begins to struggle with a touring load and camping gear on the road
Have you fitted a decent steel Tubus rack on it yet?

and its just about ok on smooth surface off road unloaded.
That I find hard to believe,I have two Vaya's that I ride off road on some pretty technical stuff and rough stuff,on slicks(one on 37c and one on 40c Hypers)and they take such terrain in there stride without issue.

It wouldnt be suitable for a camping trip that involved off road riding
That would depend on a few things,not least the amount of weight you expect to carry and how it's distributed on the bike.
If all of a heavy load is on the rear you'll struggle with any bike and whilst IMHO a Vaya can't be described as a heavy duty/expedition tourer,it's certainly a capable load carrier.
A quick google will challenge your findings.

. I never rode my Galaxy with camping gear on a tour but I dont think it would be ideal. It was a lively twitchy steed.
Another statement I find hard to take,I had a '97(last of the UK built 531ST) Galaxy for 15years that I toured on with a camping load and light loads,as well as using as my main winter bike.
I'd never describe a Galaxy as twitchy or lively,stable and solid,would be like the words that spring to mind.
Edited for typos.

Re: Cuba: - You’ll love it or hate it

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 January 2016 - 4:26pm
Linda13 wrote:Will it be possible to catch the bus back from Pinar to Havana with my bike?
On Viazul aka the foreigners' bus, I expect it's possible to catch the bus to Havana but you may well have problems trying to put a bike through the luggage system if you wanted to catch a bus from Havana. The Trinidad-Havana bus I travelled on even picked up and dropped off some cargo along the way - I'm not entirely convinced that was official, though. As usual with Cuba, it probably depends a lot on the staff on at a particular time (and it always helps if you speak Spanish), so if possible, have alternative, contingency and emergency plans ready...

http://wikitravel.org/en/Cuba#By_bike says "You have to arrange a personal agreement with the driver however, who will expect a little bonus in return. It is also possible to take bikes on trains and even to hitch with bikes"

I have no experience of the Astro or local buses.

Re: Coventry and Kenilworth

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 January 2016 - 4:17pm
ah, afraid I can't really help then.....last time I went near that path I sunk.
Syndicate content

About

CTC

Archive

  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541

Copyright © CTC 2015

Terms and Conditions