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Re: Do you ride out of the saddle?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 9 September 2014 - 8:12pm
My thought when voting "Never" was that I rarely get out of the saddle to pedal. However, reading comments others have made reminded me that I will often coast along standing on the pedals out of the saddle to relieve bum pressure, allow some air movement and stretch a bit. I do that most rides after 30 miles. However, I sort of mentally (and maybe incorrectly) excluded this from the question.

Ian

Re: Another Day In The Life Of cyclist

CTC Forum - On the road - 9 September 2014 - 8:08pm
Hi,
Ah....seem's like only essay's need apply
Lets have yours...........

Re: Do you ride out of the saddle?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 9 September 2014 - 8:01pm
PH wrote:Doesn't "Yes whenever I feel like it" cover all the other yeses?
Possibly but I'd like people who know they only do it for climbing or showboating or avoid it when loaded to pick the more specific option, please.

I forgot about descending off the back but I'm not going to add another option now unless someone really squeals.

New Route Planner

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 9 September 2014 - 7:54pm
Just did a route with the planner. For a commute of around 17 miles into birmingham.

I was looking at roads that are not too busy with traffic but provide a reasonable fast route for a cyclist as I average around 18 mph.

However the planner comes up with cycle paths and canal paths and my route has gone up from 17 miles to 20 miles. And a time from 2hrs 30mins when I could really do it in around an hour I think.

Is there anyway to put in my average speed so the planner removes slow routes but keep me off the 'main busy road sections' ?

Thoughts?

Re: Advice on accident involving a dog

CTC Forum - On the road - 9 September 2014 - 6:58pm
But it then goes on
(2) In this section “designated road” means a length of road specified by an order in that behalf of the local authority in whose area the length of road is situated.
With the next parts explaining how a road becomes a "designated road", s27 only applies to "designated roads" not all roads.

Re: 700c wheels in India?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 9 September 2014 - 6:37pm
I would set off with good quality new tyres of whatever size you need for your bike and expect to get round without replacing anything. If you do need a new tyre and you find one, the quality is likely to be poor.

In Himalayan India at least, where cycling amongst the locals is not that common, 26" MTB tyres (559mm) were as rare as 700c (622mm) tyres. Elsewhere, most bikes are Hero roadsters with 635mm wheels which is no use for the Western tourist. You would think inner tube purchasing would be easy but the Woods valve reigns supreme and finding one with a stem long enough to poke through a box section rim was difficult (but not impossible).

In Uganda there are loads of old 559mm bikes being ridden around, containered over from wherever, as well as Heroes and Flying Pigeons. Whether there's a spares market or not I don't know - people tend to ride/push bikes without maintenance until they fall apart. I guess you would be more likely to find a third-hand MTB tyre than a third-hand 700c though.

Re: A loophole?

CTC Forum - On the road - 9 September 2014 - 5:53pm
With a head cam with very clear video she would have a chance with a court case, but as it is she got very little to prove it was the other riders fault, and if she won what would she get 50p a week.

Re: Coast and Castles - Newcastle to Edinburgh

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 9 September 2014 - 5:49pm
Road to Lindisfarne is low tide passable at about 10.40am on Sunday, so fits in OK and gives me time to ride the 20 or so miles from Embleton.

Re: Advice on accident involving a dog

CTC Forum - On the road - 9 September 2014 - 5:49pm
What you need to refer to is not the Dangerous Dogs Act but the Road Traffic Act 1988 s27

It starts:
(1)A person who causes or permits a dog to be on a designated road without the dog being held on a lead is guilty of an offence.

Re: A loophole?

CTC Forum - On the road - 9 September 2014 - 5:37pm
I think a better comparison here is with something like a DIYer dropping something negligently or perhaps a climber dislodging something and in either case injuring somebody below. None of the regime associated with motor vehicles and their drivers applies to a lot of negligence in other activities. AFAIK, this is why domestic building insurance includes an element of third party cover: the mortgage lender doesn't want their security whipped away by the outcome of a compo claim.

Re: knee pain and touring

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 9 September 2014 - 5:08pm
531colin wrote:Despite what the SPD-haters say, there is more float in SPDs (etc) than in flat pedals, and it really is FREE float. Random ridges on rubber soled shoes will hold your foot at a "wrong" angle, set SPD cleats precisely so the "right" foot angle is "in the middle" of the float and the system is much better. In the old days of nail-on shoe plates http://www.classiclightweights.co.uk/components/shoeplates-components.html I had to file out the slot like a trumpet-mouth so my foot could move.
I guess you may mean me by "SPD-hater" but it's more that I hate all the myths pedalled by SPD-fanatics, such as it being more efficient or somehow better and that I must be imagining all these people who fall off their bikes from failing to unclip quickly enough.

SPDs are indeed better for positioning than old style shoe plates, but most people will find it easier to put the ball of their feet over the pedal axle (IIRC, but the bike's downstairs and I forget easily) correctly with flattish shoes on a flattish rubber pedal. Just check your feet occasionally and move if needed. If you notice that a particular shoe has sole ridges that hinder correct positioning, try another shoe that doesn't. It's not like you're restricted to expensive special shoes...

Re: Advice on accident involving a dog

CTC Forum - On the road - 9 September 2014 - 5:08pm
karlt wrote:LondonBikeCommuter wrote:pompeyreece wrote:There were no witnesses, the owner came out and admitted she'd accidentally must've left the gate open (she had popped next door to feed the next door neighbour's cat) which is how the dog escaped.

Its worth pointing out that what people say after an accident and what they say X time later when they've been handed a compensation claim or spoken to an insurance company are totally different.

How would you counter a "no I didn't I said bloody postie/meter reader etc"

Balance of probabilities is used in civil cases. The judge will ask "which is more likely?" - Cyclist is lying about the dog owner saying she'd left the gate open, or dog owner is lying about the postman (many of them hate being called posties; my father was one who did)/meter reader.
Agreed, what I was saying was that don't rely on people's story staying the same as it often doesn't when blame and money are at stake.

BTW my postperson is a woman

Re: Advice on accident involving a dog

CTC Forum - On the road - 9 September 2014 - 5:03pm
LondonBikeCommuter wrote:pompeyreece wrote:There were no witnesses, the owner came out and admitted she'd accidentally must've left the gate open (she had popped next door to feed the next door neighbour's cat) which is how the dog escaped.

Its worth pointing out that what people say after an accident and what they say X time later when they've been handed a compensation claim or spoken to an insurance company are totally different.

How would you counter a "no I didn't I said bloody postie/meter reader etc"

Balance of probabilities is used in civil cases. The judge will ask "which is more likely?" - Cyclist is lying about the dog owner saying she'd left the gate open, or dog owner is lying about the postman (many of them hate being called posties; my father was one who did)/meter reader.

Re: Biker's death filmed - horrific.

CTC Forum - On the road - 9 September 2014 - 5:02pm
For legal purposes and for awarding compensation, responsibility can be shared out. But in a wider sense, responsibility isn't a zero sum transaction (if he takes some then I have a bit less). I don't think there's any contradiction in saying that the car driver was responsible for the accident and the motorcyclist was responsible for the accident (meaning if either had acted properly then the accident wouldn't have happened). I'm talking theory here; I have no intention of watching the video.

If I see someone going through a red light on a crossing but I step out in front of them anyway, I may have legal right on my side, but I could hardly claim that I wasn't responsible for the accident. My responsibility is not affected by the driver's actions.

Re: Advice on accident involving a dog

CTC Forum - On the road - 9 September 2014 - 5:00pm
pompeyreece wrote:There were no witnesses, the owner came out and admitted she'd accidentally must've left the gate open (she had popped next door to feed the next door neighbour's cat) which is how the dog escaped.

Its worth pointing out that what people say after an accident and what they say X time later when they've been handed a compensation claim or spoken to an insurance company are totally different.

How would you counter a "no I didn't I said bloody postie/meter reader etc"

Re: A loophole?

CTC Forum - On the road - 9 September 2014 - 4:51pm
OK so instead of loophole maybe oversight might be a better word to use. It seems there are quite a number of hurdles to jump to successfully receive compensation.... witnesses, NWNF lawyer and the at fault party being able to fund any award. I'm guessing that self-funding a case would be prohibitively expensive.

Should this process be easier?

Re: knee pain and touring

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 9 September 2014 - 4:44pm
"skicat"...
Straight-leg isometric quads. exercises will tone up the Vastus Medialis very quickly, this would be my preferred option over taping, and can do no harm at all.
I find stretching beneficial.....stretching after exercise means I am less stiff next morning, but you should relax into the stretch, not use it as (another) form of competition, eg see how low you can go. God alone knows what extreme form of stretching would damage the Achilles tendon.....ever watched a high-jumper? that tendon is the thing that launches them.
If riding alone, I would stop, stretch, and self-massage as soon as the knee started hurting.....with the leg straight and the muscles relaxed, just gently move the knee-cap around....practice on the un-injured leg.
I rode for maybe 40 years with clips and straps, and I wouldn't give up my SPDs for anybody. Despite what the SPD-haters say, there is more float in SPDs (etc) than in flat pedals, and it really is FREE float. Random ridges on rubber soled shoes will hold your foot at a "wrong" angle, set SPD cleats precisely so the "right" foot angle is "in the middle" of the float and the system is much better. In the old days of nail-on shoe plates http://www.classiclightweights.co.uk/components/shoeplates-components.html I had to file out the slot like a trumpet-mouth so my foot could move.
Set your saddle as this thread http://forum.ctc.org.uk/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=74985, use low gears, also short cranks if you are short-legged.

Re: Biker's death filmed - horrific.

CTC Forum - On the road - 9 September 2014 - 4:39pm
Bicycler wrote:Agreed but have you seen the video? That wasn't the case here. The road was pretty darn straight. The car was facing towards the oncoming bike wishing to make a right turn across its path. The driver admitted to not seeing either the bike or car coming towards him. If there had been the slightest bit of doubt about whether he ought to have seen it the driver would not have pleaded guilty.
I've watched the video. I was trying to avoid doing so. I know that road and that junction very well. I worked in Norwich for years, but I don't drive it so often now. The car was turning into Wood Lane. Yes, the road is straight, but that junction is in a dip and blind over the brows both front and back. If I remember correctly, I think the motorbike would not be seen until it was level with the advance direction sign, but that's still six seconds before impact and the car only passes the point of no return two seconds before impact.

Even at the speed limit, I suspect it wouldn't have given enough extra time to brake - possibly to swerve, but that would be gambling on no car following the right-turner, plus the road surface through those junctions is usually pretty awful so braking might be impaired.

Has anyone here commented on the fact the biker had just left a race track? He pulls out from Norfolk Arena onto Saddlebow Road (2 or 3 roads away from where I sit typing this) which is 40mph max, yet his speedo in-shot shows him immediately accelerating to 60mph as far as I can tell (big notches every 20). There are lots of HGVs and agricultural vehicles turning on and off that road (that's part of why local campaigners got NCN1 diverted off it and onto a tarmac cycleway along the river bank), so he was fortunate not to meet any, or to lose control on any of the worn-out bits of that road. There's also a police base if you turn right out of the arena gates - shame no police passed and pulled him over. Basically, everything about Saddlebow Road screams that it's 40mph for good reason so I'm shocked to see a biker treat it like that... and there are quite a few bikers using it because C&A Superbikes is next to the police base and it's the nicest way for motorbikes from town to a lot of the fen villages. I know the car driver was also to blame, but should there be a compulsary "cooling off" rest before driving or riding away from a racetrack? Maybe a big "THINK" advert alongside or opposite the gates, too?

Also, thinking again, that probably means the biker did 35 miles in broad daylight along the A47 at up to 150% of the speed limit, probably including through the 6 or so villages (because the video also shows some dodgy overtaking just after leaving Little Fransham), and Norfolk Police didn't react before the crash, so I'm surprised they made such a big thing of this video. I'm also surprised that they let it be called an accident in the video.

Re: A loophole?

CTC Forum - On the road - 9 September 2014 - 4:34pm
Ah, okay. Well I think TC explains that she can. Motor vehicles are actually the exception here in that they legally require insurance and you generally deal with their insurers rather than the individuals themselves. The risk is that you get hit by someone who has no means to pay. Kwackers is right to say that her entitlement to compensation relies on her being able to back up her assertion that the other party was to blame. That requirement wouldn't be any different if the collision had involved a fully insured car or cyclist.

Re: Advice on accident involving a dog

CTC Forum - On the road - 9 September 2014 - 4:27pm
NUKe wrote:No one asked So I will "how is the Dog?

Feeling hounded.
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