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Re: Hello and a question about cycle path etiquette

CTC Forum - On the road - 25 June 2014 - 2:52pm
The highway code and most traffic laws apply equally to off road paths so vehicles (including cycles) should keep left and pedestrians ought to keep right. There are exceptions and the most obvious of these is where the path is segregated ie. one side is allocated to cyclists and another to pedestrians. In such cases cyclists are legally required to remain on their own side of the dividing line. The other law which applies to bridleways is that cyclists are required to give way to horse riders and pedestrians. Most cycle paths aren't legally bridleways but I think it is a good approach to have on all off-road paths.

Sustrans who are responsible for the National Cycle Network suggest a code of conduct: http://www.sustrans.org.uk/change-your- ... -use-paths . You mention towpaths. By and large these are not rights of way but cyclists are allowed to use certain sections. Many of us would like to see more sections opened up and it is important that our behaviour doesn't give ammunition to those walkers and boaters who would rather cyclists were prohibited altogether. Most towpaths are the responsibility of the Canal and River Trust (formerly part of British waterways). They also provide guidance on cycling etiquette: http://canalrivertrust.org.uk/news-and- ... s-and-tips

Regardless of the wording of the law or Highway Code bear in mind that strict on road rules cannot be applied to off road paths. One of the reasons why unsegregated paths are often preferred is to allow all users to enjoy the use of the full width of the path. We need to bear in mind that we are not on a road and other path users behave accordingly. They may not be expecting cyclists approaching them at speed, they may be wearing headphones, in a world of their own or accompanied by free range dogs and children. I have often suggested on this forum that if we cyclists start insisting upon modifying the behaviour of other path users the moment we are allowed to use paths, then we may find that they will be opposed to the opening of other paths to cyclists.

Other cyclists may be beginners or children or may have little road sense. Again, we need to remember that we are not on a road and that these are some of the very few places where cyclists too young, inexperienced or unconfident to use the roads can enjoy the act of cycling.

Those are my broader views on cycle path etiquette. I'm afraid you won't find any consensus on here regarding the use of bells. Many people happily use them, others prefer a simple "excuse me". Either can be polite and either can appear to be a rude "get out of my way" if approaching at speed.

Re: Hello and a question about cycle path etiquette

CTC Forum - On the road - 25 June 2014 - 2:34pm
I think it depends where you are:
  • Out in the countryside, I only ring my bell if someone hasn't seen me and I am going to pass close enough that they would probably be in my path if they tripped and fell. I ring once when I think I am just entering hearing range and again when closer if they don't seem to have heard me. If in doubt, I slow down.
  • In Cambridge and King's Lynn, I don't ring if someone is on another surface (such as a pavement alongside where I'm riding) because there are enough riders that they probably expect cycles to be where I am, but I also ring when approaching certain dodgy junctions or whenever I want to encourage other road users to notice me. If in doubt, I slow down.
  • In London, I ring like a nutter, including three pings when pulling away from most junctions, just because of the sheer number of red-light jumpers (motors and cycles) and the occasional inadvisible running commuter or jogger who has stepped out without looking. I don't slow much because it's already slow in London. If in doubt, I ring. It's not exactly quiet in London, so I doubt anyone minds too much. Bike bells sound nicer than car engines, right?
  • I have read that in many countries, ringing the bell means "I am going to crash into you if you don't move" which is a rather narrower situation than here, where the highway code has "Let them know you are there when necessary, for example, by ringing your bell if you have one" in the "should" rule 66.
My approach to all three built-up areas has changed over the years I've been riding as bikes have become more common and lots more people use bells than they used to, now that cheap "pingers" are widespread and fairly reliable. I do prefer rotary brrrrring bells or two-tone ding-dong ones, though.

Re: Touring from london to the east coast without cars: ADVI

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 June 2014 - 2:28pm
+1 for heading for Essex. I'd head out and pick up the North Sea Cycle Route in Wivenhoe. There are then a number of points then where you can get a train back to London when done.

http://www.northsea-cycle.com

Re: Hello and a question about cycle path etiquette

CTC Forum - On the road - 25 June 2014 - 2:22pm
It's just that after a while you'll get fed up with being glared at for ringing the aforementioned bell. Some pedestrians seem to interpret it as "get out of my way!" I suspect they're mostly car drivers who use their horn to mean that so think that's why you ring the bell.

Hello and a question about cycle path etiquette

CTC Forum - On the road - 25 June 2014 - 1:12pm
I just joined today so hello to everyone


I started some fairly regular commutes using mostly canal towpaths and cycle lanes earlier this year. As a car driver I tend to keep left ( as long as stingers and brambles allow ) and always use my bell when approaching blind corners or pedestrians. The keep left seems to be pretty well observed by other cyclists but It seems that I am the only cyclist above the age of 6 to use a bell. Is there any unspoken etiquette for using cycle paths that I am unaware of?

Brummoi

Re: Touring from london to the east coast without cars: ADVI

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 June 2014 - 12:34pm
You say heading east and then along the coast and presume you mean heading south/southwest (Kent - East Sussex - West Sussex). But for less traffic I'd have thought the Essex, Suffolk, Norfolk coasts would be better. In which case why start on the wrong side of the Thames?

Re: Speed Wobble and hand position.

CTC Forum - On the road - 25 June 2014 - 12:25pm
I have a Specialized Roubaix that got a fierce wobble at about 40 mph. Scary. The knee gripping thing fixed it. The road surface was quite good. The front wheel has a Gatorskin, the back has a Panaracer Pasela I got cheap. I don't often go at 40 mph but I've felt a tremor at about 35mph since then. IIRC my hands were on the hoods when I got the bad wobble.

Touring from london to the east coast without cars: ADVICE

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 June 2014 - 11:51am
Hello all,
I am looking to go on a touring holiday next month. I am setting off from London, heading east to Kent, then want to continue along the coast. destination unknown. I would really like to avoid cars and main roads. sticking to canal paths, forests(with paths or dirt track) diss-used railway tracks(that are not totally over grown), quiet-ways and coastal trails......if anyone has a routes they have used in the past it would be great to get your advice.

The aim is to be in nature, by the sea and experience the beauty of the English country side. I am open to all suggestions advice and even going the opposite direction if it will have less cars.



Thank you in advance for your advice.
Luke

Re: When I flew with my bike this is what happened......

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 June 2014 - 11:15am
BA LHR-TXL - checked in fine in box, bike protected with pipe lagging and blocks of wood between forks and stays
BA LHR-TXL - checked in fine in box, bike arrived with rear stays and forks bent. Foolishly, no blocks between stays and forks Replacement frame ordered, fully reimbursed by BA
BA TXL-LHR - checked in fine in black nylon bag (btwin I think, perhaps DHB), no protection on frame. Bike arrived fully in order
BA LCY-DUS - checked in fine in CTC poly bag, asked to let the gas out of the tyres, bike arrived fully in order
LH DUS-MUC - checked in fine in CTC poly bag, no questions r.e. gas in tyres, bike arrived fully in order
LH MUC-PUY - checked in fine in CTC poly bag, no questions r.e. gas in tyres. Catastrophe in transit though - bike lost for 4 days, eventually arrived having gone via CPH and ZAB. Bag had taken immense punishment over the course of that transit, miraculously the bike was fine though
LH LHR-MUC - checked in fine in box, bike protected with pipe lagging and blocks of wood between forks and stays. Bike arrived fully in order
LH MUC-PUY - checked in fine in box, bike protected with pipe lagging and blocks of wood between forks and stays. Catastrophe in transit though - bike lost for 4 days, eventually arrived having gone via CPH and ZAB. Box was basically annihilated at time of delivery, having been forcibly opened several times for security clearance. Fortunately no loose bits in the box, hence nothing lost
BA VEN-LGW - checked in fine 2 bikes in CTC poly bags (one brand new, the other more packing tape than poly bag after LH's treatment of it). Asked to let gas out of tyres, bikes arrived fully in order

Bottom line - the only problem I've had has been the MUC-PUY flight, from which I extract the lessons - 1) boxes are worse than CTC poly bag, and 2) if at all avoidable, do not plan to take a bike on any aeroplane smaller than an A318 or 737. If forced to take a routing involving smaller planes, consider the typical passengers on that route at that time of day/week/year (e.g.LCY-DUS was on an Embraer 170, but it is a business route (i.e. most handluggage only) so there was plenty of space in the hold).

Re: Dawes 531 frame re build

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 June 2014 - 8:58am
Even in the glory days of 531 frames, people used to have distinct builds for loaded touring as opposed to general touring, because the latter flopped around on hills with heavy luggage. 531ST was a variant for stronger bikes. Oversizing the seat stays was a common adjustment often seen before oversizing everything became popular.

Further, to call it a proper expedition bike rather than just a beefed up tourer for camping via tarmac, you really also need clearance for fatter tyres than the 32mm the 531 touring frames were often designed to take. Even 40mm tyres are going to make a big difference, but don't fit in typical touring frames: they are quite a good compromise for mixed surface tours.

The cost of building up a bike from individually procured components, even if the frame is free, is such that I would have thought that it wouldn't cost so much different to get a purpose-designed off-the-shelf expedition bike.

Re: Dawes 531 frame re build

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 June 2014 - 7:40am
Oh come on, that's the best excuse there is for a new bike!
I'm just building up bike number 5 as a belated retirement present to myself.......

Old standard size 531 (inch top tube, inch and eighth elsewhere) is much slimmer than modern steel frames, and therefore less stiff. It needs careful building to make an adequately stiff frame for really loaded touring in the large sizes. On the other hand, if you are small and light, an old 531 frame can be much more forgiving unloaded than a modern over-engineered offering.
A bike you use for heavy and lightly loaded riding will have a compromise to be reached.

edit.....that's pretty recent for 531, isn't it?

Dawes 531 frame re build

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 24 June 2014 - 11:18pm
I have an Edinburgh bike Co op County (Dawes frame made from 531 tubing ) that I have used for two lejog s and loads of weekend rides carrying two panniers and bar bag on unsupported tours. It has seen better days and I am thinking of rebuilding it into an expedition bike adding front racks and panniers and carrying a tent with all the gubbins to attempt a coastal tour around Britian when I retire in a couple of years time. Do you think this 12 to 15 year old frame is up to the challange and can you suggest what wheels, groupset, brakes etc will be up to the job but not break the bank to buy..........oh I already have a number of B17s so the saddle is sorted.
Thanks for any advice

Dawes 531 frame re build

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 24 June 2014 - 11:04pm
I have an Edinburgh bike Co op County (Dawes made from 531 tubing ) that I have used for two lejog s and loads of unsupported weekend carrying two panniers and bar bags . It has seen better days and I am thinking of rebuilding it into an expedition bike adding front panniers and carrying a tent with all the gubbins to attempt a coastal tour around Britian when I retire in a couple of years time. Do you think this 12 to 15 year old frame is up to this challenge is up to the challenge and can you suggest what wheels, groupset, brakes etc will be good but not break the bank ..........oh I already have a number of B17s so the saddle is sorted.
Thanks for any advice

Re: Advice with my accident please

CTC Forum - On the road - 24 June 2014 - 10:08pm
Hi,
As thirdcrank says, DONT rush for settlement (believe you have three years from accident to start claim ? ) I did not but today I would probably have received considerably more as more is known about my deficient imune system.
A good soliciter will (we hope) look carefully at your injuries and the way your health might be affected in the future, even if they tend simply to go on whats wrong now, not what might happen to your health later

Edited - P.S. - I made a claim on my partial dislocation and now permanant, colar bone, my GP said If I was older it would be a permanant disability it is now,
and I did not think till now that my pain whilst cycling a stabbing pain in the shoulder could be connected

Re: Advice with my accident please

CTC Forum - On the road - 24 June 2014 - 9:58pm
I can't offer you any advice, especially as you have already instructed a solicitor, but here's a bit of an explanation.

The police role is to investigate criminal offences (eg careless driving) with a view to prosecution. A conviction leads to punishment. This is about "guilt" rather than "liability" for a "tort" or civil wrong (eg negligence) which has to be established to achieve a civil claim for compo. This is a private matter for the injured person and nothing directly to do with the police, although the evidence gathered by the police can be used as the basis for a claim and it's even better if it leads to a conviction. (A claimant's solicitor can buy a copy of the police accident report and will normally do so as a matter of routine.)

Civil claims rarely go to court and are usually settled through negotiation, which can be prolonged. In driving cases, most of the negotiation is with insurance companies who won't rush to cough up, but can see the writing on the wall no matter how much their policyholder may prevaricate. If a driver is uninsured, then the Motor Insurance Bureau (MIB) acts as though it were the driver's insurer.

A civil action involves two separate elements, of which establishing liability is the first. The second is deciding how much. With personal injury cases, this is largely a matter of applying the established scale rates to the medical evidence of injury. It's unwise to rush to a settlement till the full extent of injury and any disability are clear.

(Tony R posted while I was writing this.)

Uppermill Easy Rides

CTC Forum - On the road - 24 June 2014 - 9:43pm
We are running these 'starter' rides last Saturday o each month

Come along or spread the word if you are local

http://www.saddleworthclarion.co.uk/starterrides.htm

http://saddind.co.uk/?p=5937

All welcome

Re: Advice with my accident please

CTC Forum - On the road - 24 June 2014 - 9:36pm
I think its more complex than that and happened when my mother's car was hit by an HGV that changed lanes into her. The case went to Court and he was found guilty of driving without due care and attention but when it came to damages in the Civil Court the conviction carried no weight and we had to start a new case from scratch.

I would ask the police for a copy of his statement now the criminal case is finished and confront the insurance company with his admission of liability

Re: Brooks B17 or what?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 24 June 2014 - 9:34pm
The only issue with a B17 on a carbon bike that springs to mind is you'll roughly double the weight...

(B17 is my usual Weapon Of Choice, take it, and if it doesn't work post it back to yourself, if it does you know you'll have a comfy rear end for the duration)

Pete.

Re: Advice with my accident please

CTC Forum - On the road - 24 June 2014 - 9:17pm
Pretty normal tactics in an attempt to get you to back off. Then they admit liability before they get found liable in court.

Re: Advice with my accident please

CTC Forum - On the road - 24 June 2014 - 9:06pm
Sounds like the driver changed their story and then changed it back again. It is their right but I suspect their solicitor suggested they were on pretty weak ground.
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