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Re: Cycle Touring in the Outer Hebrides - Questions

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 June 2014 - 9:57am
Regarding the two mentions of midges so far, I was very amused to discover there is a Scottish Midge Forecast website here, updated on a daily basis. Arguably more important than the weather forecast

Re: Speed Wobble and hand position.

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 9:53am
Pete Jack wrote:. IIRC my hands were on the hoods when I got the bad wobble.

You would've been lucky then. Had they been on the lower drops you'd have been shaken not stirred!

Re: Two Abreast

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 9:46am
When I'm cycling with one other, we usually single up on busy roads, however if it's 4 or more we'd stay two abreast.

Re: Hello and a question about cycle path etiquette

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 9:44am
mjr wrote:So you'd rather they created problems for the cyclist coming the other way who they maybe won't have seen? Way to throw the rotting dead squirrel from your lawn onto your neighbour's roof!

What on earth are you on about? You're going down a cycle path, pedestrians on the left, just like you would on the road you check the way is clear to overtake and you overtake them. If there's another cyclist approaching in the opposite direction you wait and overtake after they've passed. If the pedestrians are walking on the right, i.e. towards the cyclist this creates problems for both as both are approaching each other and so both parties will likely have to stop to wait for the cyclist in the opposite direction. In both situations the pedestrians are expected to do nothing but hold their line, as you would expect.

I think "walkers keep right" is a good idea, but I know some people walk on the left of country roads without footways


That's a very different situation. Walking on the right on country roads, is so that you can see cars approaching you and step out of the way in good time, pedestrians are not expected to that on cycle paths, nor should they, so lumping the two together is dangerous.

Re: How much rubbish is too much

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 9:42am
How many times have I mentioned gel wrappers, etc.? And looking about, I am not the only one.

Who cares if it is not the only rubbish, or if MacD customers throw more of the litter out there? MacDs are much more widespread than cyclists sadly. Even so, any litter is crass, and gel wrappers are as crass as the rest of it.

Take your damn litter home or put it where it belongs.

tatanab wrote:Calling it a race is just sloppy, mind you I've seen charity rides described as races in the charity's own publicity.

Eh? Does this make any difference to the matter at hand?

Anyway... Likewise innertubes, CO2 canisters, patch backings, snapped bungees, whatever, crap is crap, deal with it appropriately.

Re: Another cyclist killed by lorry in London

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 9:38am
AndyBSG wrote:If you got a licence before 1990 then you could drive a 7.5 tonne lorry without an HGV licence or any form of additional training.

It was complete madness because 7.5 tonnes are completely different to drive to cars and much more like driving an artic with regards to blind spots, swing and clearance on turns, etc which is why it was changed in 1990 to bring in the test for them

I'm happy enough driving big box vans etc, but 7.5 tonne is huge!
I would probably be OK - but I'd absolutely want my wife or father with me as a banks-man when slow and a secondary observer when driving (just two people I'd trust in that role - there are a few more, but not many)

Re: Glued locks

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 9:26am
Postboxer wrote:When my brother was at school he had his lock stolen but they left his rustbucket bike, I'll never understand why they wanted a lock that they were able to steal.
To lock up a nice looking bike, then come back in the middle of the night...

Re: Leh-Manali-Chandigarh

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 June 2014 - 9:11am
Crazyguyonabike.com will give you a selection of travelogues to give you a hint.

http://www.masterlyinactivity.com/links.html has a collection of links on Himalayan touring. Though sadly pocketsprocket.com which was a really useful resource seems to have closed or migrated. But Laura Stone who created it has written a book on cycling the Himalayas - maybe that's why - which you should probably buy.

Leh-Manali-Chandigarh alone can be done in not much over a week, so you must have quite a lot of other adventures in mind to fill up 6 weeks. Leh-Manali itself can just about be done without tent/cooking equipment, but it's a bit of a risk because you might encounter some bad weather which slows you down so you can't get to the next place in time. When you consider also your undefined other adventures, it becomes rather hard to say.

Expecting the passes to/from Ladakh still to be open in late September is rather optimistic. Later in the season there is good cycling further to the east, Uttar Anchal area, as masterlyinactivity.com describe on their site. But even in the more populated areas and on tarmac you can need to cover quite a lot of ground to get to the next accommodation.

If you've never done this kind of thing before, you should be taking advice on what kind of bicycle will survive being ridden heavily laden on bad roads.

Re: Another cyclist killed by lorry in London

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 9:00am
If you got a licence before 1990 then you could drive a 7.5 tonne lorry without an HGV licence or any form of additional training.

It was complete madness because 7.5 tonnes are completely different to drive to cars and much more like driving an artic with regards to blind spots, swing and clearance on turns, etc which is why it was changed in 1990 to bring in the test for them

Re: How much rubbish is too much

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 8:58am
eileithyia wrote:not sure if this was a race or not, but if it was a sportive, they do not need to eat the items on the move and can stop and deal with the leftovers IMHO. It was a sportive https://virginmoneycyclone.co.uk/Cyclon ... owPage=549 Calling it a race is just sloppy, mind you I've seen charity rides described as races in the charity's own publicity.

Re: How much rubbish is too much

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 8:34am
While I do not like to see evidence of possible cycle related rubbish on the roadside, I would agree that it did not seem excessive compared to what I see daily along the roadside, even one McD's takeaway takes up more space in a rubbish bag......
Yes we should be bigger and better than the motoring community and take a rubbish home, I know it is difficult with gel packets cos there is always some left in the tube which will ooze out over your kit when you put it in your pocket... for me the solution is to take a small sandwich bag and put the gels back in that after use.
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Lets be honest, not sure if this was a race or not, but if it was a sportive, they do not need to eat the items on the move and can stop and deal with the leftovers IMHO. Most professional race events have specific areas for rubbish to be jettisoned and fine riders who do not use these areas, plus they have a clean up wagon behind the event

Re: Paris

CTC Forum - Racing - 26 June 2014 - 6:41am
Yes, a bar in Paris with a TV that will show it with a good atmosphere, that would be good

Re: How much rubbish is too much

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 4:01am
If it was half a mile stretch where was the rest of the rubbish? He had a few items in the bag..hardly what I'd consider to be more than the usual rubbish discarded from cars etc

Re: Cycle Touring in the Outer Hebrides - Questions

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 June 2014 - 12:10am
Your sleeper choice (from London Euston) is;
to Glasgow Central then train to Oban (latter is bargain of century, £10.49 single for lovely 3hr trip)

or, for example, returning from Stornoway, ferry to Ullapool then bus with bike trailer to Inverness (less than a tenner).

You will have missed the sleeper bargains (released 12 weeks ahead) but the Caledonian Sleeper website is quite good for displaying prices. I failed to see how to book my bike online (if, indeed, it's possible) but did it all by phone. Booking the bike is essential (and free)!!

Recommend Phillips Red Map of the Outer Hebrides: one map (rather than 6 or more OS maps) just about enough detail. As mentioned, there aren't many roads. Your choice will be East or West in some cases (eg Barra and Harris) but otherwise one road!

I can't answer about your bike but managed fine on my hybrid with 32mm Marathons. The roads are much better than here in Essex.

And beg, steal, borrow or buy, Richard Barrett's "Cycling in the Hebrides", it's got all the info you need.

I'd be envious but I'll be on Lewis myself next week

Have fun!

Edited to add: sorry, after re-reading OP I'm not sure how you were planning to get to Glasgow, sleeper wasn't actually mentioned!

Re: Cycle Touring in the Outer Hebrides - Questions

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 June 2014 - 12:02am
1. My bike is a King of Mercia - Mercia 531 touring bicycle (road bike style), so my first concern would be will the bike be up to the terrain? Would a route from south to north take me on dirt tracks or can a road be followed throughout?

as mentioned will be fine as long as it can take the load

2. I'm planning on undertaking the trip on as a tight a budget I can, so:
a.) What would be the cheapest way to get onto the islands from London (Glasgow - Oman - Isle of Mull was my intial thoughts)?

use the train and book as far as possible in advance to get cheapest possible

b.) Will I be able to camp throughout the route? I will probably be traveling in either late July or August, so would anybody know if campsites are likely to be rammed at this time? Is wild camping an option?

yes you can wild camp, also look at hostels, some allow you to camp. good campsites in barra, lewis and harris. it is south and north unst where you will have to look at wild camping/hostels camping

c.) What would a realistic budget be from anybody that has undertaken the trip fairly recently?

Outer hebridges, if you do some wild camping, no cafes, beer abou £10 per day excluding ferries.

3. Any suggested routes? Possible detours, stop offs etc...

vartersay, completely stunning. barra airport on beach, mountains of south east harris, the beaches.

4. Any other suggestions - creative routes to get back home if I could extend my annual leave for another week or so?

take the ferry across to sky from outer Hebrides, more beautiful scenery

Thank you in advance as always. Look forward to your suggestions.

Max[/quote]

Re: Advice with my accident please

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 June 2014 - 12:01am
Does the damage to your bike not support your version of events also? If possible your solicitor should get a copy of their police statement where they admitted liability, along with details of any repairs they had to their car.

I think first thing to do is to check if they are still disputing liability after the conviction.

Re: Hello and a question about cycle path etiquette

CTC Forum - On the road - 25 June 2014 - 11:57pm
Mark1978 wrote:Bicycler wrote:The highway code and most traffic laws apply equally to off road paths so vehicles (including cycles) should keep left and pedestrians ought to keep right.

No matter what the HC code says, this is a bad idea. IMO pedestrians should walk on the left of the path so I'm overtaking them in the same fashion as I would another bicycle or like a car would overtake a bicycle on the road. Them walking towards you creates problems if there's a cyclist coming the other way, and they are also walking towards you at the same time.
We've had this subject come up before and I do remember not everyone agreed. I do keep right when walking on roads and cycle paths. I once had personal experience of being clipped from behind by a passing cyclist when walking along a shared use path. No injuries but there could have been. We can not assume that others' behaviour will always be up to scratch so I would much rather trust my own judgement and move a bit to my right if I think a cyclist is about to pass too close, than put all my faith in the actions of the cyclist approaching from behind. The type of cyclist who will pass too fast and too close is also the type of cyclist who won't bother to announce his presence. A wary pedestrian needs to keep looking over his shoulder if he keeps left and wants to be aware of approaching cyclists. Much greater comfort and better observation are possible by facing the oncoming traffic.

As a cyclist I would much rather be approaching pedestrians looking towards me than with their backs to me. They are instantly aware of my presence and this reduces the number of times where you need to alert them to your presence with a bell or call. Pedestrians seeing an oncoming cyclist may courteously choose to move slightly to the side to give you more room, allow you to pass through a barrier first, go into single file or get their dogs under control. These factors may allow you to pass more quickly and easily.

I don't accept the idea that right-keeping pedestrians are an inconvenience to cyclists. The difference the pedestrian makes to overall closing speed is small. Approaching and during an overtake speeds should be sufficiently low that both parties can safely stop anyway. If the pedestrian's direction of travel did make a significant difference then surely it would benefit the cyclist by reducing the duration of the overtaking manoeuver lessening the chance of having to give way to an oncoming cyclist. A simple assumption would be that there are equal numbers of people travelling in each direction so the chance of being unable to pass a pedestrian because of oncoming cyclists would be the same regardless of whether pedestrians were required to keep left or right. In reality traffic tends to be greater in one direction than the other at particular times of day. Thus it is reasonable to expect a cyclist would, on average, have to make more overtaking manoeuvers of left keeping pedestrians than right keeping ones, increasing the chance of conflict with oncoming cyclists. That holds true for a simple path where there is room for a cyclist to pass a pedestrian. Obviously it becomes a non-issue where there is no room to pass.

Re: Hello and a question about cycle path etiquette

CTC Forum - On the road - 25 June 2014 - 11:55pm
Trigger wrote:Lucky you. I too tend to keep left out of instinct, but every cyclist I meet coming towards me on the section of shared use path near me are always on their right/my left so I'm forever trying to make eye contact and playing the game of trying to see who is going to move over (usually me).
My trick is to show the palm of my hand on the side I want to pass (usually left) to the front just above my handlebars, on its side. Usually works.

I thought walking on the right was so they could draw their swords unobstructed?

I think brring bells sound friendlier, plus might trigger memories of bikes of the past in some people.

Re: Using a Marin Lombard CX (cyclocross) as a touring bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 June 2014 - 11:51pm
There was a thread some time ago where it was pointed out that there are real cyclocross bikes that dont make good tourers and there are bikes called cyclocross bikes (that no cyclocross racer would ever race with) that make quite good tourers.

The latter would have things like rack and mudguard mounts on the fame.

Re: Glued locks

CTC Forum - On the road - 25 June 2014 - 11:50pm
When my brother was at school he had his lock stolen but they left his rustbucket bike, I'll never understand why they wanted a lock that they were able to steal.
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