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Re: 10,000 miles in a year finally

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 December 2014 - 7:38pm
Congrats.
I'm around 7,700 miles this year.

The last time I checked, my sat nav was close to my cycle computer, about +/-0.1%.
It all depended on how hard my tyres where if it under or over reading.

Re: proviz victim blaming advert

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 December 2014 - 7:29pm
ferdinand wrote:I think that's quite a good thought provoking advent.

Certainly, pootling around my market town in the dark, there is no shortage of cyclists with no lights at all, or lights that are more like fireflies in a jamjar.

The comment about spoke reflectors makes the key point that it can be any item that alerts others to your presence. I find that pedal reflectors are good at standing out for cyclists is urban camo. This jacket is one more opportunity for cyclists to be more visible at eye level for most drivers.

My one serious critique of this jacket, apart from price, is that there could be more done to help during the day, when battleship grey hides a cyclist as effectively as it hid HMS Belfast.

I'm interested that road.CC in their piece equate 'right' with 'as required by law'.

Ferdinand


Weirdly the areas with higher numbers of military personnel tend to link with higher cycling rates.

Bizarrely a lot of these cyclists are wearing camouflage gear

Yet the accident rate doesn't reflect this



There are two reasons.....

Either the MOD needs to rethink camouflage as it doesn't work

The visibility of the cyclist is not really a factor

Re: Accident waiting to happen.

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 December 2014 - 7:29pm
beardy wrote:edited to add: I expect that exceptions would be taken for cyclists who use their pedal cycles as mobility aids, but that has never been tested.


How would a motorist know which cyclists they were allowed to mow down and which that they are not?
You can not have priority decided on factors that are not visible to everybody when the decisions have to be made.
Someone using a pedal cycle as a mobility aid may be considered a pedestrian, rather than a cyclist. As I said, this has never been tested. Priority shouldn't be decided on factors that are not visible, but the law, as they say is an ***.

Re: 10,000 miles in a year finally

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 December 2014 - 7:24pm
NUKe very well done indeed.
reohn2 - I empathise with you. Sickness, bad weather and caring for another has drastically cut mine down to the lowest in over 14 years - I'm just within striking distance of 2000 miles if I go out tomorrow and at least one other day.

Re: Accident waiting to happen.

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 December 2014 - 7:20pm
thirdcrank wrote:This is again IIRC, because I've looked all this up and linked before.
Indeed you have and there was enough detail in your above post for me to find it, here, thank you.

Off topic but it leaves me wondering what to make of all those give way markings they festoon across cycletracks near bus stops, pedestrian crossings, etc if they only oblige cyclists to give way to other vehicles

I've got enough sense not to go ploughing into pedestrians without the need for markings that only indicate that I'm not obliged to give way .

Re: 10,000 miles in a year finally

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 December 2014 - 7:11pm
10,000 miles is a fantastic achievement in one year, well done!

Re: Accident waiting to happen.

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 December 2014 - 7:09pm
This is again IIRC, because I've looked all this up and linked before. There are three GIVE WAY situations in the current TSRGD (remember, pedestrian crossing are not at present in the TSRGD)

These are: at the junction with a main road; at a signed chicane; and at a level crossing. In none of those situations does a driver have to give way to pedestrians. Bringing pedestrian crossings under the aegis (whatever an aegis is) of the TSRGD will streamline it all

Part of my reason for mentioning level crossings is that even when they have gates and all sorts of fancy warning devices, drivers are still prepared to try to avoid giving way to trains - and we've had at least one thread about a cyclist ditto.

In theory, at least, a driver who drives badly in these situations may be prosecuted for careless or dangerous driving. eg although the regs only require a driver to let a pedestrian go first, passing closely behind a pedestrian so they jumped out of the way would be an offence. Current practice seems to differ.

Re: North to south of france ?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 23 December 2014 - 6:53pm
I did St Malo then East end brittany, then Loire valley, maybe then centre? And onto the Massif Central when heading to Antibes. Edit- this trip was not in winter but I travel regularly to france ( like many of us)- sometimes for cycling, other times for skiing or just chilling out.

France is a big country with enough forest/woods/ rustic areas that if you are determined to do the Robinson crusoe thing you can. It will be more difficult in eastern Brittany and the Loire valley as that's more heavily populated but it should still be doable. Whether it will be enjoyable is another matter!

I have wild camped in France but only in an emergency and I speak French ( some of the accents in more rustic parts are more challenging!). You can always ask a farmer if you can camp in their field ( best to enquire via a local bar- they will know the options). I have also camped in municipals out of season - trying emailing the tourist office in the first couple of places you plan to stop- you may not have showers/loos though but there is a good chance of a cold tap.

I wouldn't choose to do what you are doing but we all differ. I'd be heading for Andalusia/further south probably in January but whatever rocks your boat- you usually just have to get out there and figure out if it works. Take a credit card in case of crisis!

Re: Accident waiting to happen.

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 December 2014 - 6:51pm
thirdcrank wrote:... the definition of "give way" (and this is from memory) is along the lines that the driver must not cause danger to the other or cause the other to change speed or direction. ...
IIRC (and all too often I don't ) the current definition of "give way", at least in terms of road markings and signs, applies only to other vehicles not to pedestrians. My memory comes from something posted on here and my guess would be that it was posted by tc. I've tried to find it again a few times, without success, so maybe I just thought it up and it has no basis in fact.

Re: 10,000 miles in a year finally

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 December 2014 - 5:37pm
Chapeau to you sir.

I have managed 4983.49 miles and need another 17 before the end of the year for the 5000.

My longest ride was 81 miles on July 27th but was probably also the hilliest.

Re: proviz victim blaming advert

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 December 2014 - 5:34pm
Cunobelin wrote:This is almost worth a complaint to the ASA

The advert is misleading, makes unsubstantiated claims and misrepresent the abilities of the product
I recently complained to Proviz about another of their adverts, which I think is misleading. They replied that they are happy with it.

Re: Cycling to Axbridge from Bristol

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 23 December 2014 - 5:22pm
ferdinand wrote:I always enjoy cycling rivers from the source to the sea. Are there any suitable riverswith interesting cycling in the area that could be recommended?
Well, Loxton is by the Lox Yeo which rises near Winscombe and you'll pass that on the routes given to get to Loxton, so the obvious one is following that down to join the Axe and flow out just south of Weston-super-Mare. Not a long ride in itself, but the days aren't long at the moment either and there's plenty of places to stop along the way there.

Another tributary of the Axe is the Cheddar Yeo which rises in Cheddar Gorge and some of the tourist places may still be open but the small waterfalls have an altogether more tranquil air out of the main season.

Or following the Axe itself up could take you through Wedmore to Wookey Hole near Wells. All three interesting places to visit too, although I've still not been to Wookey. From Wookey or Cheddar, you could climb over the Mendips to Chilcompton near the source of the River Somer, which I think flows roughly near the Colliers Way (I've not yet ridden that one) to join the Avon near Dundas Wharf and then following the Avon would take one through Bath, then on to Bristol and under the Clifton Suspension Bridge and Avonmouth Bridge... and then riding over the Avonmouth Bridge (there's a small mixed-use path accompanying the M5 over it!) gives access to the slightly odd Gordano Valley (it's like a river valley but there's no river in it) which leads to the Victorian resort of Clevedon and so back to Yatton and the trains or the route back towards Loxton.

Alternatively, it's not far from Wells to Glastonbury and the Tor, or you could head east from Wells to Brewham and the source of the Brue and follow it downriver through Glastonbury, past the Sweet Track (I think) and to its end at Burnham-on-Sea (again not far from Loxton), but the last 20 miles is across the very flat (and sometimes very wet) levels, which might not be your cup of tea.

Re: 10,000 miles in a year finally

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 December 2014 - 4:48pm
Good stuff Nuke! I wish I got to ride that much and could keep up the drive and determination.

Mick, I am curious about your track. Did you go for a wander after the roundabout? Or just like playing chicken on the wrong side of the road? Or could that be the GPS wandering...

Anyway, normally it could all depend on the update rate of the GPS device and the filtering in use. Also, when putting GPS data into a computer, certain software will use a lower sample rate also- when putting my Garmin data into RidewithGPS, points are lost. In the grand scheme of things, GPS is going to pretty damn good, and I have no doubt Nuke's done so close to his measured value it's not worth being pedantic about it. I don't want to think too much about all this though, and agree with TC about splitting the 2 discussions.

Re: Accident waiting to happen.

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 December 2014 - 4:44pm
edited to add: I expect that exceptions would be taken for cyclists who use their pedal cycles as mobility aids, but that has never been tested.


How would a motorist know which cyclists they were allowed to mow down and which that they are not?
You can not have priority decided on factors that are not visible to everybody when the decisions have to be made.

Re: Accident waiting to happen.

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 December 2014 - 4:20pm
There is currently no legal obligation to give way (or cede priority) to cyclists who cycle across a zebra. The only way they can currently obtain the legal priority at an uncontrolled crossing is to dismount and use it as pedestrians.

It's possible that the design of a facility could make a difference in a legal ruling in the event of an incident; that is, if a fecility were clearly designed to allow cyclists to pedal across, drivers *should* cede priority and a legal decision might at least note that. But of course, there is no guarantee of that.

edited to add: I expect that exceptions would be taken for cyclists who use their pedal cycles as mobility aids, but that has never been tested.

Re: 10,000 miles in a year finally

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 December 2014 - 3:54pm
Find a straight bit of dual carriageway and measure the distance along it using the 100mtr markers.
I did this, and my GPS was correct over 12Km on the A30.

Re: 10,000 miles in a year finally

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 December 2014 - 3:43pm
I am going on what actually happens.

In my early days with a GPS (before they had mapping in) I took a walk through the forest, you could even see which side of the track I was on walking back, compared to when I walked out.

I could repeat my walk a few days later and it would leave an identical track but offset by a few (or even more) metres.

On a bike they will slightly under read the mileage as they take the shortest route between points and the bike doesnt quite manage that.

Re: 10,000 miles in a year finally

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 December 2014 - 3:35pm
beardy wrote:The guy doesnt really know what he is talking about.

The GPS may be ten metres out but it is consistently misreading your position for long periods of the ride. So instead of the picture he drew with points all over the place, it would follow your track quite well but always nearly the same distance away from your true location.

So using his analogy it is like having the collie dog on the end of a towbar. Always in a slightly different place but doing the same distance.

depends on what type of error is involved? if its a random type error then your view dont hold? I suppose you would get the type of errors described if reception not the best?

Re: 10,000 miles in a year finally

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 December 2014 - 3:33pm
Read the linked article, and read others like it too.
Not really correct either.

The article supposes that the GPS device is plotting raw positions. If it were true - and I'm not saying it's not - the track displayed on a computer would show the staggered plots.

Trouble is, computers have programs, and these programs sort out the staggers.

My GPS is accurate to 7ft normally. Thick tree cover upsets it, but if it can see the sky ok, it's accurate to 8ft or maybe 10ft. Either way, 10mtrs is WAY wrong and completely factually incorrect!

Look at this map of my track in Tavistock recently.
I'm coming in from the south, then heading out southwest.
Can you see any stagger or inaccuracy of the track?
Does it look smooth?
Click for bigger views.Screen shot 2014-12-23 at 15.24.40.png
The problem with that article, is that it suggests measuring 5k on an athletic track. The difficulty GPS has is starting at start point and finishing at end point. If you were to do a "flying start" and a flying finish, then crop out the track from the start point to the end point, I reckon it would be correct.

Any road up, this is completely off topic and should not detract from a WONDERFUL achievement.
Congratulations, I'm well impressed.

Re: 10,000 miles in a year finally

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 December 2014 - 3:31pm
Well done, NUKe and I'm sure you enjoyed every mile.

Perhaps a moderator might split the thread at this early stage, so that the interesting subject of inaccurate mileage measurement can be discussed elsewhere without raining on NUKe's parade. I imagine he's been rained on enough during 2014 already.
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