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Re: Action on Dangerous Drivers - Worth the Effort

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 September 2014 - 12:34pm
Graham wrote:I often wonder if the offending driver is ever REALLY fired.
It must be so tempting for the company person to use such a statement as a fob-off to placate the complainant.

The usual response in any organisation is for the insiders to close ranks and ignore or fob-off the outside threat.

How will we ever know if they are REALLY fired ??

That is why I always follow up with the video

Having to write a letter retracting and apologising for their previous statement is something managers hate as it makes them look inefficient and stupid. They then take this out on the driver who has put them in that position by lying.

... and yes they do get fired.

Re: Do I need front panniers for touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 September 2014 - 11:33am
I think it would really help if the OP clarified what he/she was really asking. Is it, "Do you really need to take so much stuff for camping?" or is it, "Do you need front panniers or can you pile everything on the back?" I think we've all assumed it's the former but if that's the case, the answer is easy - no you don't need front panniers if you don't take much stuff and yes you do if you do. This thread really has got nothing to do with front panniers.

Re: Ditching my Hybrid for a full Spec Tourer

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 September 2014 - 10:42am
Ultimately the right bike is the one you feel happy on all day. If you stop looking for another bike then you've found your bike.
Im rather smug because I found mine with my first purchase (a dawes galaxy 2nd hand). While others dont rate it, for me its like my noble steed, it does 10,000 miles/year based on current estimates. At the end of a long day Im often grateful how comfortable it is, especially when im pushing that extra 20 miles to get to my campsite.

If you like green then go dawes galaxy, its a great colour!!!

Re: Do I need front panniers for touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 September 2014 - 10:33am
You dont *NEED* front panniers but I find them handy for storing clothes and sleeping kit with food on top for easy access.

What I do notice is that front panniers significantly slow me down over a day. But then it pays for itself by having a comfy nights sleep.

For me it boils down to if I need to sleep or not.

Re: Action on Dangerous Drivers - Worth the Effort

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 September 2014 - 10:25am
ummm no. If your numbers up, its up. This is of course taking into account that you've done everything to protect yourself.

I have a 2 step process for this

1) Take up some kind of religious or superstitious belief. Try crossing your fingers just before that HGV rumbles by...
2) If that doesnt work complain to whatever diety you want to believe in when you get there...

Re: Do I need front panniers for touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 September 2014 - 10:04am
Saw some people on Hadrian's Cycleway using the plastic bucket method this weekend. http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/?doc_id=1841

I like front panniers, one big fluffy pillow in each. Do like a good nights sleep.

Re: Biker's death filmed - horrific.

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 September 2014 - 9:10am
I don't see what the problem is.

The driver admitted he didn't see the motorcycle and there was no reason that he shouldn't have done. He was prosecuted and found guilty.

As a motorcyclist (and cyclist) I'm frankly more than a little annoyed how frequently stuff like this happens. I ride a huge bright green motorcycle whose twin headlights sit on full beam on bright sunny days yet I've lost count of the number of times I've had to actually stop to let the car that was in the process of cutting across my lane pass. Often without even looking in the direction they're travelling!

If the guy had seen the bike and misjudged the speed then I'd have had some sympathy but he didn't.

Re: Cyclist killed in lorry collision

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 September 2014 - 8:47am
RIP Condolences to family and friends

Re: Solo night ride

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 September 2014 - 8:06am
It sounds like you have the option to auto recalculate the route turned on. Turn this off and also turn on the option for off course warnings. This should help you stay on course. Sounds like a great ride.

Re: Biker's death filmed - horrific.

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 September 2014 - 7:22am
Pete Owens wrote:Try looking at this from the drivers pespective:

Stop the BBC video at 48 seconds. I don't think it would be unreasonable for a driver to decide at that point that they could make a right turn. The truck is over 200m away and will take about 9 seconds to reach the junction. Did you see the white van behind the truck? That is where the motorcycle would have been on the day. Now roll the video forward to 53s - if the white van was a 100mph motorcycle this would be the time of the crash.
Yes I did see the white van, although of course I'mm off to the side of the road.

There is the very real issue that you don't expect vehicles (without flashing blue lights) to be doing 60% in excess of the speed limit on a road - and that's 60% more road covered by an oncoming vehicle. However the bike was visible, it didn't appear from round a corner.

It looks like the driver wasn't stopped in the filter lane, but made the turn continuously from the oncoming lane, although perspective makes that hard to be sure on the video - giving neither party time to observe the other.

Re: Biker's death filmed - horrific.

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 September 2014 - 7:06am
Byronius Maximus wrote:While I can understand Norfolk Constabulary's reasons for releasing the video, and I think that it is incredibly brave of the mother to allow the footage to be used, I think the video misses the mark somewhat.

It provides more 'shock' value than any road safety video I've seen, which might serve to make people think momentarily, but what does it achieve? The video only seems to help people viewing it apportion blame to one side or the other, or both, rather than giving messages or advice about what road users can do to avoid such situations. If people had entrenched views about the safety of motorcyclists or var drivers before watching this, those views will only become further entrenched (as shown by the bile-filled post above).

For motorcyclists, I guess the message is obviously to ride with an appropriate speed (amongst other things), but what about car drivers? Look twice? Move your head when looking for vehicles to avoid your natural blind spot?

I don't see any of these messages coming through in the video so I feel it merely has a momentary shock factor which is soon forgotten but doesn't really give the viewer much to go away with to think about what *they* as a road user could do better, rather than looking at a video and talking about what others are doing wrong.

True.

It's easy to apportion blame *away* from our own positions (I'd have never done *that*) rather than look at the lessons available.

Re: Biker's death filmed - horrific.

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 September 2014 - 6:54am
Tonyf33 wrote:That he then rode at that stupid speed one handed ignoring all the hazards makes him a muppet, an idiot.
It's fine to express your opinion that he was riding dangerously, etc., but there's no reason to call him names.

Re: East West C2C Spanish Pyrenees Tour.

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 September 2014 - 4:06am
Incidentally, the opencyclemap route I linked to in my first post is very much an off road MTB route.

I met some guys who were doing it in a week with a support vehicle a day before they finished. About 3000 mtrs of climbing a day. They were all absolutely exhausted and I have absolutely no idea why anyone would want to put such a challenging time pressure on a trip like that. The Pyrenees are beautiful and deserve to be enjoyed. Anyway...

Re: Biker's death filmed - horrific.

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 September 2014 - 3:32am
mark a. wrote:Most of the replies agree that the rider was going too fast, and that was a contributing factor, so we all agree with you on that.

Note that no-one else felt the need to call him an idiot, a muppet or have been glad that there's "one less selfish idiot" - as if his death is a just dessert.
So what? I'm an individual not afraid to speak my mind, I can't say the same for other people..I frankly don't care if anyone doesn't feel they can say what they really want to but are afraid to because others might fingerpoint.. If you think I'm being insensitive..hard lines..this person was selfish beyond belief without a care for anyone on the road including himself and more so his family.
That he then rode at that stupid speed one handed ignoring all the hazards makes him a muppet, an idiot.

That doesn't make me 'wrong' or inappropriate or whatever other descriptive given to me by Ellieb, I will however Ellieb make the point that I never at any point said I was glad that this person died..that makes you the one in the wrong here for suggesting that!! that's akin to me saying I thought they deserved to die.. quite frankly that is beyond a joke and trying to make out I said that is far more inappropriate than anything I've said to describe the actions of the motorcyclist.
However the facts are borne out that he is one less person to mess about with other people's lives!

Re: Biker's death filmed - horrific.

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 September 2014 - 1:59am
Bicycler wrote:I think the car driver was still to 'blame' for this one if that word is even appropriate in such a scenario. I don't think the car would have cleared the junction had the motorcycle been doing 60mph but obviously if he had been doing half his speed and considered the possibility of the car turning then he may have been able to avoid the collision. I always say that 'blame' is fine for macho roadside posturing over scratched car paint and insurance claims but where people are liable to be injured or killed the question should be whether each individual had taken every reasonable action to ensure the collision did not occur (having priority is not sufficient). IMO both failed in this respect.

Try looking at this from the drivers pespective:

Stop the BBC video at 48 seconds. I don't think it would be unreasonable for a driver to decide at that point that they could make a right turn. The truck is over 200m away and will take about 9 seconds to reach the junction. Did you see the white van behind the truck? That is where the motorcycle would have been on the day. Now roll the video forward to 53s - if the white van was a 100mph motorcycle this would be the time of the crash.

Remember it takes time from the decision to move and the vehicle starting to move - and once you are moving it takes time to initiate a stop - so while it looks from the video as if the driver simply pulls out at the very last minute, the initiation of that manoevre will have been taking place very much earlier before the biker was even in view.

Re: Biker's death filmed - horrific.

CTC Forum - On the road - 7 September 2014 - 11:53pm
Tony f I agree with you 100 per cent. This motorcyclist's behaviour is suicidal and riding in this manner had predictable consequences. It's lucky that he didn't take anyone else out. It's tragedy but a wholly preventable one and the blame is all down to him. I think he was selfish for putting his family through this, but I have no sympathy for him. I see this sort of behaviour from motorcyclists all too often. Especially on sunday runs round here, they speed excessively, overtake in all sorts of dangerous places. Speed kills.

Re: Biker's death filmed - horrific.

CTC Forum - On the road - 7 September 2014 - 11:20pm
While I can understand Norfolk Constabulary's reasons for releasing the video, and I think that it is incredibly brave of the mother to allow the footage to be used, I think the video misses the mark somewhat.

It provides more 'shock' value than any road safety video I've seen, which might serve to make people think momentarily, but what does it achieve? The video only seems to help people viewing it apportion blame to one side or the other, or both, rather than giving messages or advice about what road users can do to avoid such situations. If people had entrenched views about the safety of motorcyclists or var drivers before watching this, those views will only become further entrenched (as shown by the bile-filled post above).

For motorcyclists, I guess the message is obviously to ride with an appropriate speed (amongst other things), but what about car drivers? Look twice? Move your head when looking for vehicles to avoid your natural blind spot?

I don't see any of these messages coming through in the video so I feel it merely has a momentary shock factor which is soon forgotten but doesn't really give the viewer much to go away with to think about what *they* as a road user could do better, rather than looking at a video and talking about what others are doing wrong.

Re: Ditching my Hybrid for a full Spec Tourer

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 7 September 2014 - 10:44pm
I have a koga miyata randonneur.the cheaper version of what mark Beaumont went round the world on.I have had it about 5*years now.done lots of touring.camping and I love it.was much better than the dawes ultra galaxy then.and the new ultra I saw yesterday has gone downhill.excuse the pun.pedals were awful.no lights.cheap looking taped handlebars.look into it.good luck.

Re: Another A38 Accident

CTC Forum - On the road - 7 September 2014 - 10:24pm
TonyR wrote:BeeKeeper wrote:Sadly, this death sends it's own message. Stay off this road.

And the deaths of cyclists on minor roads and in towns? What message does that send? Stay off the roads altogether?

Sad as these incidents are, they are extremely rare. There are many other things we do in daily life that are far more likely to kill you. The danger is we start to engender (and probably already have) a Fear of Roads for what is an extremely safe activity. The real issues with riding on these sorts of roads is how threatening they can feel, not how threatening they are.
I think you are missing my point. Cycling accidents can happen anywhere but my instinct is cycling on a road like the A38 is significantly more dangerous than other roads. It is hard to prove as there is no data relating cycle miles to accidents for this bit of road I know about but as someone who drives about twice or three times a week past the spot where this poor guy was killed I wince every time I see a cyclist. The speed and density of traffic leaves no space for cyclists - who as a motorist you often get the first warning about by the brake lights of vehicles ahead coming on. It is a two lane motorway by any other name.
This is a subjective view but nothing would ever make me cycle on this stretch of road. My view might be influenced by the fact I nearly killed a cyclist a few years ago on the A38. I was in my car, it was pouring with rain, I slowed down and followed a truck as my exit approached. When the slip road began on my left, designated by the dotted white line, I started moving left. Suddenly, through the spray thrown up by the truck I saw a cyclist pedalling straight on. Fortunately I am fairly manic about not tailgating so was far enough behind the truck ahead to see the cyclist in time for me to cut back onto the road, miss the cyclist and my turn off. A sobering experience.
The cyclist should have turned up the slip road and crossed it at right angles further up but there are no signs at this junction suggesting this and it was his right to stay on the A38. I suspect he doesn't know how close he came to death that evening.
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