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Re: Garmin Edge GPS

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 August 2014 - 10:41pm
Mick F wrote:Good advice Si.
I use GPX tracks and hardly ever let my Garmin do any navigation by itself.

Create a track on BikeHike.co.uk and transfer it to your unit. That way, you get a pink line to follow, all the route info and distances and elevations, but no turn-by-turn directions. TBH, the constant navigation messages about turns drives me bonkers, and it's not that good either, so the pink line is perfect for me.

Someone once said, "Never trust anything that can think for itself."
Oh, mine did proper navigation round a GPX, don't onow of anything special gpsies does though...

Re: Garmin Edge GPS

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 August 2014 - 10:23pm
Much more can be read about Garmin GPS units on YACF.

Re: Side saddle cycling

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 August 2014 - 10:14pm
I think the tennis ball idea is good.

Stops the chainring getting bent when he falls off.

This IMHO, is from past experience.

The BIG question is,,,

"Which is the front and which is the back?"
"I've never seen anything like it in my life."

Re: Safety - not mine

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 August 2014 - 10:13pm
John Holiday wrote:What you really need is a sturdy Dutch type 'ding/dong' which I have found effective at 50m. & penetrates even those walkers with headphones on!
Most of my bikes have this type & have found them very effective, & frequently elicit favourable comment from people one is passing.
So much more civilised than a shout!

I ride regularly with a chap who uses one of these. I must get one because you are right, it frequently elicits favourable comments and smiles. Something about its happy dual-tone is unthreatening.

Re: Solo night ride

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 August 2014 - 10:09pm
Grandad wrote:Use the quietest roads you can find that have a white line down the centre. Ride on this until you see headlights from an oncoming or overtaking vehicle then move to the side. This way you are clear of the worst potholed areas for most of the ride. If the line starts moving from side to side it's a warning that you are getting sleepy so have a brief stop to get off for a drink and perhaps a very short walk (or if there is a bus shelter around a 10 minute nap!)

Also, in pitch dark, you can't keep an eye on which gear you are in!

I ride whichever gear is comfortable without worrying about knowing the details.

Until the time when you've unknowingly got onto big ring and largest sprocket and then want a lower gear.

Talk about inconsiderate cyclists

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 August 2014 - 9:58pm
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-28945834

The last hazard that a blind pedestrian needs

Re: Solo night ride

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 August 2014 - 9:49pm
Use the quietest roads you can find that have a white line down the centre. Ride on this until you see headlights from an oncoming or overtaking vehicle then move to the side. This way you are clear of the worst potholed areas for most of the ride. If the line starts moving from side to side it's a warning that you are getting sleepy so have a brief stop to get off for a drink and perhaps a very short walk (or if there is a bus shelter around a 10 minute nap!)

Also, in pitch dark, you can't keep an eye on which gear you are in!

I ride whichever gear is comfortable without worrying about knowing the details.

Re: Solo night ride

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 August 2014 - 9:35pm
I don't think I've ever had a close pass at night even on completely unlit roads..compare that with daytime riding and I'd not be overly concerned. More drivers tend to nod off on straight long roads that mean they can stay in one gear for long periods without ever having to brake. Most A-roads at least have roundabouts to break up the journey.

If you're going to have two rear lights, one on slow flash and one on steady is the way to go..

Re: Safety - not mine

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 August 2014 - 8:43pm
c53204 wrote:Using a 'pinger' type at the moment £2.

Any recommendations, feel free to let me know. I'll try the dutch type.

I'd agree. Pingers are next to useless IME. You need either the dutch type or a good old fashioned British ring-ring bell. Its more recognisable as a bike bell and you can just keep ringing it until they do notice. The only downside is its a standard ringtone so some people look at their phone when they hear it rather than looking for a bike.

Re: Bike Security Locked At Supermarket Bike Rack

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 August 2014 - 6:44pm
Pandaz wrote:I'd never leave a bike locked up anywhere overnight.

Its just crazy, you come back next day and half the parts will be missing!
I've left mine locked at a station for 4 days, I was abroad - cycle to station, train to airport.

No problem. But I don't live in a major city...

Re: Safety - not mine

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 August 2014 - 6:39pm
Using a 'pinger' type at the moment £2.

Any recommendations, feel free to let me know. I'll try the dutch type.

Re: Decent bike shop in Taunton?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 August 2014 - 6:13pm
That's good. Didn't realise you were here this week!

Re: Safety - not mine

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 August 2014 - 5:52pm
There's no simple solution.

Airzound: definitely no. Their intent is to frighten motorists, not pedestrians.

I once thought I'd given a pedestrian a heart attack. He was blithely jogging along the centre of a narrow country lane, oblivious to all else, not wearing headphones as far as I could see. I slowed my pace to his, a few feet behind him, and gave him what I thought was a very polite and quiet "excuse me". His reaction was as if I'd set off a bomb or something. Sometimes you can't tell....

Re: Decent bike shop in Taunton?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 August 2014 - 5:49pm
Well Ivan, the mechanic at Ralph Colman really came up trumps. I had a call this morning at 8:50am to say the job was done and I could collect the bike. They also did us a special deal because we are raising money for charity. Top bloke and top shop. I have raised their score to ten out of ten.

Re: Bike Security Locked At Supermarket Bike Rack

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 August 2014 - 5:43pm
Our local campaigning group (Chester Cycle Campaign) recently carried out a survey of all the local supermarkets. We looked at their parking for cycles & other cycle friendly aspects, (covered:type of parking stand:security cameras:near front of store/visibility:encouraging staff to ride etc.)
We recently presented the Morrison store in Saltney,on the Welsh side of Chester, with a framed Certificate to mark their achievement as being the best in the area. Some of the major stores were poor & our worst was Iceland in the town centre.
Hopefully,the publicity which accrued from the local press etc. will encourage the others to raise their standards!

Re: Safety - not mine

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 August 2014 - 5:33pm
Are you using a 'pinger'?
What you really need is a sturdy Dutch type 'ding/dong' which I have found effective at 50m. & penetrates even those walkers with headphones on!
Most of my bikes have this type & have found them very effective, & frequently elicit favourable comment from people one is passing.
So much more civilised than a shout!

Re: Do I need front panniers for touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 August 2014 - 5:27pm
bikes4two wrote:axel_knutt wrote:You wouldn't catch me using a bar bag even, for the same reason........................................................

A fair point - one of our club members, whilst cycling in India, had their bar-bag literally ripped off the handlebars by the pillion rider on a moped! That was her passport, phone, ipod and other essentials gone - it makes you think?

A bit off topic but out of interest, where/how would you recommend carrying said valuables?
While it has to be said I'm only going as far as WildNWooly Normandy, not India, I'm going to try wearing all my essentials on a belt - a Viper, the sort sold to police and security staff. My 'essentials' are: passport, cash/cards, glasses, phone and a multi-tool. That way all the stuff I'd be in trouble if I lost will be firmly clamped to me and hopefully, out-of-sight. I just hope it won't look too Rambo!!

Re: Solo night ride

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 August 2014 - 4:49pm
Psamathe wrote:Earlier on somebody mentioned a head-torch.

Last year I got a puncture (in car) at night and happened to have a head-torch in the car - and it made life so much easier changing the wheel. Both hands free and light exactly where you want/need it.

Of course if you took everything you might ever possibly find helpful you'd be needing more than several trailers. But thought I'd mention how impressed I am with the head-torches.

Ian

even more important if you rely on dynamo lighting (not that I've had to walk several miles to find a street lamp, I wouldn't be that disorganised.......)

Re: Side saddle cycling

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 August 2014 - 4:30pm

Wonderful!

I did consider a JOGLE with a cycle-rickshaw with Mrs Mick F sitting pretty on the back. She could carry on knitting or reading her Kindle, or just admiring the scenery. She was unimpressed by my idea, so it died a death.

Re: Side saddle cycling

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 August 2014 - 4:17pm
Mick F wrote:. I must admit I was daydreaming about JOGLE on a trike ...........

https://www.eta.co.uk/2013/05/17/the-cr ... motorhome/

think of the saving in hotel bills..
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