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Re: Burly blokes on the pavement - why?

6 March 2015 - 10:28pm
In a world of sufficient resources then yes, all laws should be enforced if there is a public interest in them being enforced. All I was suggesting was that limited resources should be allocated towards the most serious breaches of law. When inconsiderate, reckless and aggressive driving routinely goes unpunished it is disproportionate to put resources into prosecuting minor cycling misdemeanours.

Whilst accepting what you say about the old lady, my sympathy is limited. Quite simply this is an example of how cyclists are singled out and treated differently. Every Tom, Dick and Granny feels entitled to lecture cyclists about what they ought to be doing, usually (as here) from a position of complete ignorance. UK road conditions being what they are she will have experienced genuinely dangerous driving behaviour but I can guarantee that she would not feel the need to educate a car driver she anticipated was going to misbehave. It is socially acceptable to do so to a cyclist. Bad drivers are seen as individual bad apples, bad cycling is evidence of the failings of all cyclists.

Re: Burly blokes on the pavement - why?

6 March 2015 - 5:28pm
Bicycler wrote:Let's work on prosecuting the dangerous offences of motor vehicle drivers and once we have completely eradicated dangerous driving from the roads we can attend to matters like nuisance cycling
Let's tackle everyone who breaks the law whatever they're doing,but the dangerous one's need to have heftier penalties imposed upon them.

BTW, cycling is permitted in many "pedestrian" areas. If cycling is prohibited there should be a no cycling sign or no vehicle sign (red circle with nothing inside). Cycling is perfectly legal in pedestrian zones where there is only a "no motor vehicles" sign (motorbike above a car inside a red circle)
But not many people know that,and in the case of tempsperdu's encounter with the lady I have some sympathy with her.Being small and old she'll more than likely feel vulnerable and UK society being what it is,she's more than likely experienced the yob on a bike riding far too quickly through crowds,so needed to make her feelings known.
FWIW last summer Mrs R2 and I were on the tandem on Morecambe prom(wide shared use)we'd ridden up from Glasson Dock,unbeknown to us there was some kind of 'do' on and it was packed with people dressed up in various forties and fifties clothes.
We rode slowly and considerately through the crowds,and stopped at a vacant bench to take in the spectacle,we were amazed at the number of cyclists of all ages carving their way through the crowds in what I would consider a dangerous fashion.
So I can see a little old lady's point,it's the few idiots(once again)who spoil it for the rest.

Re: Burly blokes on the pavement - why?

5 March 2015 - 3:29pm
Let's work on prosecuting the dangerous offences of motor vehicle drivers and once we have completely eradicated dangerous driving from the roads we can attend to matters like nuisance cycling

BTW, cycling is permitted in many "pedestrian" areas. If cycling is prohibited there should be a no cycling sign or no vehicle sign (red circle with nothing inside). Cycling is perfectly legal in pedestrian zones where there is only a "no motor vehicles" sign (motorbike above a car inside a red circle)

Re: MTB C2C Ravenglass - Ravenscar

27 February 2015 - 8:45pm
Do you guys have a gpx of the route. I'd like to try it myself in the next few months. I did half of the wales coast to coast yesterday, before being taken away in an ambulance

Re: MTB C2C Ravenglass - Ravenscar

13 February 2015 - 2:34pm
I've not hired a van for a good few years, but I think I paid about £150 for a long weekend for a great big Peugeot hdi, think tranny Van but a bit bigger, seats 3in the front.

Might be worth looking into. Remember to factor in the diesel cost.

Edit, didn't read the OP was going coast to coast!

Re: MTB C2C Ravenglass - Ravenscar

13 February 2015 - 12:47pm
Friend or man in a van hire?

MTB C2C Ravenglass - Ravenscar

11 February 2015 - 8:13pm
Hi all i am looking into doing the MTB Coast to coast trip from Ravenglass to Ravenscar and am looking for any travel information that anyone has experienced. me and 2 friends will be travelling from Sheffield to raven glass and Ravenscar to sheffield. I have looked into trains and they are around £60 per person each way and although there is no charge for taking the bikes they only allow a certain amount on at one time and its a first come first served basis. as there are 3 of us i don't want to risk not all getting the same train so I'm hoping that someone can help with any suggestions/advice.

Re: Heading for Exmoor - footwear required

8 February 2015 - 4:37pm
Thanks for all the suggestions.
Dartmoor is also an option for me, probably taking my tent and, maybe, the train as far as Totnes and setting up a base camp. That worked well for me last year at Builth Wells.
As for the footwear, I'll probably go for waterproof, lightweight boots and keep my Brashers in reserve.

Re: Heading for Exmoor - footwear required

8 February 2015 - 12:02pm
Hi,
robert.stanford wrote:I regularly bike and hike. My recommendation would be flat pedals and a light weight fabric boot (preferably gortex lined). I like Salamon but any make should work well. The important thing to check is that there is sufficient movement in the cuff to allow peddling. They are also got for winter/wet riding. I know people who walk rough terrain in trainers and others that will only do the same walk in three season leather boots you might need to give some thought for what will work for the type of walking you do. There may have to be some compromise. Hope this helps.
This is the main problem with cycling with boots, I would say that up too two - three hours or 30 miles you are OK its after that when the lack of free movement in ankles will affect your lower legs / knees, but how hard you push also has bearing, so if you are taking it easy on the cycle is probably best bet.
Flat pedals, even without clips, with boots.
If you take walking gaiters they with add waterproofness to boots and importantly add some perceived stiffness to boots which is what you need unpathed walking.

If you are sticking to track and paths with out much on your back then walking shoes would be OK but if your packing 25 Ibs plus and walking off path then boots are mandatory, if you don't want sprained ankles.
Good luck, as said it depends on the walking your going to do.
Edited - For Grammar

Re: Heading for Exmoor - footwear required

8 February 2015 - 11:06am
I regularly bike and hike. My recommendation would be flat pedals and a light weight fabric boot (preferably gortex lined). I like Salamon but any make should work well. The important thing to check is that there is sufficient movement in the cuff to allow peddling. They are also got for winter/wet riding. I know people who walk rough terrain in trainers and others that will only do the same walk in three season leather boots you might need to give some thought for what will work for the type of walking you do. There may have to be some compromise. Hope this helps.

Re: Heading for Exmoor - footwear required

8 February 2015 - 10:23am
I walked this walk the other week and am here to report that the marked paths were for the most part, little streams. Armed with that info, you may choose to take with you, your most water-proof option...Dunkery Beacon.jpg

Re: Heading for Exmoor - footwear required

8 February 2015 - 9:42am
Love them or hate them....



Shimano MT90

I do a lot of investigation of barrows, stione circles and churches, so I find these a reasonable compromise between a walking boot and a cycling shoe

They are good at both tasks, but not perfect

A little heavy compared to shoes

The cleat can cause problems if you are scrambling

Re: Pumping up 29er 2.4inch tyres

8 February 2015 - 1:17am
Just reviving this thread to suggest tubeless as an alternative. I've had two flat in a year since going tubeless, and one of them was a dented rim and the other a sidewall tear.

Re: Heading for Exmoor - footwear required

8 February 2015 - 12:04am
Hi,
You might find some of the coastal walks interesting on Exmoor, most of the moor proper has been farmed up.
If you can ever get further south to Dartmoor this is walking heaven, so much more to see in views as well as antiquities.
Depending on your bike boots I know there are plenty tracks on Exmoor for cycling even more on Dartmoor.
If you are cycling 50 miles to start you must be staying over night

Re: Heading for Exmoor - footwear required

7 February 2015 - 10:03pm
Moving on,
I think lightweight boots are the way to go. My Brashers weigh in at 1490 grams (a pair). Modern lightweight boots seem to be about a half that weight.
For a test sample, see:
http://www.outdoorsmagic.com/gear-featu ... 278-3.html

Re: Heading for Exmoor - footwear required

7 February 2015 - 9:21pm
Hi,
I usually secure my bike to a fence post or tree, or suchlike. I try to leave it out of sight of the road, and keep my fingers crossed that it'll still be there on my return. As it's my No 3 bike, a 15 year-old Raleigh, I think it's a risk worth taking.

Re: Heading for Exmoor - footwear required

7 February 2015 - 9:13pm
Hi,
Where are you leaving your bike
Cycling shoes would not be good for walking due to lack of waterproofness unless you are going in summer.
I would carry some lightweight sturdy walking boots with me.

Heading for Exmoor - footwear required

7 February 2015 - 8:07pm
I’m the proud owner of several books suggesting Exmoor Walks. Unfortunately, starting from Wellington, the starting point for these walks normally includes about 50 miles of cycling, out and back. My heavyweight Brasher boots are fine for walking, but aren’t so good for cycling. Can anybody recommend suitable waterproof footwear for my self-imposed biathlons? Should I take a big leap and buy some (expensive?) Mountain Bike SPD boots/pedals? Or perhaps I should just take the cheaper option - take the boots in my pannier bag?

Re: Burly blokes on the pavement - why?

6 February 2015 - 2:43pm
I don't know if this is true as I never bothered to verify it but was told off by little old lady for preparing to ride off on my MB in a pedestrian area.
Apparently in Germany anyone who commits a traffic offense on a bike and has a driving license for a car lost points on the license.
Seems like a very sensible idea and no I don't know what happens if you don't have a license.
Perhaps better not to ask.

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