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Updated: 2 hours 18 min ago

Re: How limiting is a rigid bike?

3 May 2015 - 1:01am
deliquium wrote:I didn't realise one could do an off road track from Joe Brown's to Llyn Ogwen - MUST investigate, cos the A5 trunk road is OFNADWY!
Yep,just follow the road 'till you run out of tarmac

I know and love the lanes from Bethesda to Llanberis - but prefer to avoid the traffic strewn Llanberis Pass and take the longer minor lanes via Ceunant and Waun Fawr back home
Agreed!
I just love the that road from Waun Fawr

You'll have to come over, be kind, and show me how to ride off tarmac John?
We'll definitely have to get together for a ride when I'm over your way,hopefully in the not too distant,not so sure I can teach you anything though,you looked pretty capable to me last time we met

NO I am NOT ever going to have disc brakes or suspension forks - BY THE WAY
I don't blame you about the suspension forks,but the discs are really good off road 'apparatus'

Re: How limiting is a rigid bike?

2 May 2015 - 9:19pm
Bicycler wrote:People went mountain biking before suspension.

People went down bridleways and canal paths on road bikes, before mountain bikes came along.

How far back do you wanna go with this?

If you put a 32/36h wheelset on and something like 25c Marathon Plus (that have an all purpose tread) I can't see why going down trails would be that bad, you'd just have to learn how to handle skinny tyres on a trail. Handling will be harder but damaging the bike or being bumped around, I wouldn't be too worried about.

My only concern would be the wheels not having enough spokes, mine are only 20/24h, but why are the potholes along canal paths and trails any worse than English roads anyway - they aren't! There's potholes not even 100M from my house that will just bend the rear wheel if you went over it too fast. On my street there's a grid running parallel to the kerb as well. I have never in my life seen anything that dangerous on a canal path or bridleway! Yet there it is right on my street.

Some parts of the UK's roads are just ridiculous. Like riding over a load of 1cm cubes or something, except the cubes are stuck there... they call it "tarmac" lol. All peeling away in layers.

Re: How limiting is a rigid bike?

2 May 2015 - 7:20pm
reohn2 wrote:
It's a nice trail .
What TP's do you have in the Rando's?

For road use approximately 40 front and 45 and a bit rear

reohn2 wrote:There's also a nice trail from Capel Curig(accessed past the car park by Joe Browns shop)parallel with the A5 to Llyn Ogwen then the small lane to Bethesda,then over to Llanberis and back up the pass

I didn't realise one could do an off road track from Joe Brown's to Llyn Ogwen - MUST investigate, cos the A5 trunk road is OFNADWY!

I know and love the lanes from Bethesda to Llanberis - but prefer to avoid the traffic strewn Llanberis Pass and take the longer minor lanes via Ceunant and Waun Fawr back home

You'll have to come over, be kind, and show me how to ride off tarmac John?

NO I am NOT ever going to have disc brakes or suspension forks - BY THE WAY

Re: How limiting is a rigid bike?

2 May 2015 - 5:31pm
deliquium wrote:
Thanks Bicycler for resurrecting/updating this post. Having been a tarmac only rider since 1957 or thereabouts (apart from a brief dismal attempt at owning and riding an Orange Clockwork across muddy rutted Wiltshire bridleways in the 1990s), I discovered yesterday a shared use hardpack trail Lôn Gwyfrai from Rhy Ddu down to Beddgelert, which I rode on a 1987 Raleigh Avanti 531 ex mountain bike frame, now revamped into the 'Summer' shopping bike LINK. This was on 26" x 1.5" Vittoria Randonneur Pro road tyres.

I loved it!. It's only 3.5 miles of tarmac road away before I'm "off road" and can't wait to explore more of the Beddgelert forest NON-TECHNICAL hardpack trails.

But the tyres were a bit non grippy on some of the steeper gritty parts, so I'm thinking of buying Schwalbe Land Cruisers, which are available for £20 a pair and building back up the 1990 Raleigh Blueridge 531 frame and forks that I tired to sell and couldn't* into a gentle easy forest track pootler.

Should I go for the 1.75" or the 2.1" and is there any reason these shouldn't be suitable? There's clearance on the frame and I won't be fitting mudguards. I don't want to go fast I won't ride through mud

* viewtopic.php?f=32&t=95709

It's a nice trail .
What TP's do you have in the Rando's?
I've ridden it a couple of times on the Vaya/Hypers(700x38s,45fr 65r) no worries,though I do find it better to sit in and twiddle a small gear on any loose stuff.

There's also a nice trail from Capel Curig(accessed past the car park by Joe Browns shop)parallel with the A5 to Llyn Ogwen then the small lane to Bethesda,then over to Llanberis and back up the pass

I was going to say you don't know how lucky you are,but I know you do

Re: How limiting is a rigid bike?

2 May 2015 - 12:42pm
Bicycler wrote:As the OP, some of the early posters were correct in guessing that my interests laid more in pootling off road touring than full on MTBing. For the past year or so I have been enjoying riding an old rigid Rockhopper for this purpose which has been great fun.

I thank all the posters for their responses and I particularly like some of the more adventurous pictures

Thanks Bicycler for resurrecting/updating this post. Having been a tarmac only rider since 1957 or thereabouts (apart from a brief dismal attempt at owning and riding an Orange Clockwork across muddy rutted Wiltshire bridleways in the 1990s), I discovered yesterday a shared use hardpack trail Lôn Gwyfrai from Rhy Ddu down to Beddgelert, which I rode on a 1987 Raleigh Avanti 531 ex mountain bike frame, now revamped into the 'Summer' shopping bike LINK. This was on 26" x 1.5" Vittoria Randonneur Pro road tyres.

I loved it!. It's only 3.5 miles of tarmac road away before I'm "off road" and can't wait to explore more of the Beddgelert forest NON-TECHNICAL hardpack trails.

But the tyres were a bit non grippy on some of the steeper gritty parts, so I'm thinking of buying Schwalbe Land Cruisers, which are available for £20 a pair and building back up the 1990 Raleigh Blueridge 531 frame and forks that I tired to sell and couldn't* into a gentle easy forest track pootler.

Should I go for the 1.75" or the 2.1" and is there any reason these shouldn't be suitable? There's clearance on the frame and I won't be fitting mudguards. I don't want to go fast I won't ride through mud

* viewtopic.php?f=32&t=95709

26th April 2015 ride to Grange-over-Sands and Winster

30 April 2015 - 11:41pm
Dandelions on the tarmac bridleway to Sampool Bridge by simeonorme, on Flickr

You can see rest of photos of 26th April ride to Grange-over-Sands and Winster at this link http://www.southlakesgroup.org/april-2015/26th.html

Re: Simeon's ride photo galleries

30 April 2015 - 11:29pm
A lunch time view by simeonorme, on Flickr

You can see rest photos of 19th April ride to Bannisdale and Grayrigg at this linkhttp://www.southlakesgroup.org/april-2015/19th.html

Re: What's wrong with the Schwalbe Marathon Plus MTB?

26 April 2015 - 10:39am
I'm too tight to go paying that amount for tyres! For road riding the Contis look to fill a niche, particularly for people with only one bike. If you have a spare bike then there's a decent argument for fitting spikes to it and deciding on the morning. Tyres like the Schwalbe Winter, Marathon Winter and Snow Stud are much less extreme than the Ice Spiker, which really is for off-road conditions.

Re: What's wrong with the Schwalbe Marathon Plus MTB?

24 April 2015 - 3:39pm
The Ice Spiker is a studded tyre for sheet ice or (?) packed snow. Perhaps it is OK for frozen single track too.

That is, for absolutely minimal use in most of the UK.

Personally I used Top CONTACT IIs this winter, which are more like the normal winter tyres for cars that the industry is shouting about , as opposed to studded tyres for ice.

Ferdinand

Re: Burly blokes on the pavement - why?

19 April 2015 - 8:32pm
I've seen that too, quite a lot- and really have no idea...It seems to take anti-social dicking about to new levels

Re: Fat bike and camp up Tal-y-fan

19 April 2015 - 3:44pm
Thanks I liked the skull bit as well could not resist a camera set up there lol...Yeah I know but thought I would put them in just in case lol. The bike is a On-one Fat bike and the music is electric pow wow drum by a tribe called red
Glad u enjoyed it

Re: Fat bike and camp up Tal-y-fan

19 April 2015 - 8:48am
Great fun! Lovely shots - like the 'pass by skull' best You can lose the captions, though... not needed.

Re: Fat bike and camp up Tal-y-fan

19 April 2015 - 8:05am
Great! Looks like you had a good time. What's the bike and the music? Brilliant photography btw...b

Fat bike and camp up Tal-y-fan

18 April 2015 - 9:04pm
so decided to get the bike packed and head up for a solo night out on the mountains...cold and very windy but a great little adventure

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EM3B84s7t_Y

Re: Surly Big Dummy Handle Bar Width

12 April 2015 - 7:39pm
Cheers Rick. I did 6 miles today with about 20kg on the back and it all seemed tickedy boo. I'm going to leave it for now having taken off 20mm from each side and if I think it needs more off, I'll start with 5mm each time....b

Re: Surly Big Dummy Handle Bar Width

12 April 2015 - 6:52pm
Both my mountain bike bars and the straight bars on my Circe Helios (which in load carrier mode not dissimilar to the BD - it appears to be a similar overall length) got chopped down to about 53cm end to end, mainly because that was a short as I could get them by moving everything towards the middle as far as it would go.

I've never found myself thinking "I wish I had wider bars" but have on occasion been glad they weren't any wider. Before chopping the bars on the Helios (the MTB - a 1986 Muddy Fox but not the origianl bars - had the bars chopped long enough ago that I can't remember if I had problems) they wouldn't fit through A barriers in the Greater Manchester area (although they did just fit through ones around Chester - they must have different installation specs). On the Helios I wouldn't want the bars much narrower as I prefer the front bars to be wider, even if just by a small amount, than the stoker bars (when in tandem mode - which is for me the most frequent configuration) so I don't have to worry about getting stuck halfway through a narrow openings as we do use it on traffic free routes (which often have barriers of one sort or another) regularly.

Rick.

Re: Pumping up 29er 2.4inch tyres

12 April 2015 - 11:39am
Heltor Chasca wrote:That is a staggeringly beauty of a bike. You should be proud.......b

In a kind of rugged and windswept way,in a certain light I s'pose it could be described as beautiful.
Though I'd describe it as more 'honest workmanlike' myself
But thanks anyway

PS,If it strums yer strings here's some more photos:-
https://picasaweb.google.com/1046928466 ... directlink

Re: Pumping up 29er 2.4inch tyres

12 April 2015 - 11:33am
That is a staggeringly beauty of a bike. You should be proud.......b

Re: Pumping up 29er 2.4inch tyres

11 April 2015 - 11:51pm
Heltor Chasca wrote:..... I have just got to know about those mudguards. What have you cobbled together there with all those stays? Do you get any crud catching near the BB?....b

The m/guards are 65mm Blumels (from Spa £20 per pair),I bought two pair and used the two rears,one on the rear and one on the front.The rear fitted to the front has the 'L' bracket and one of the stay brackets from a spare front guard,pop riveted onto the (rear)longer front.The stays to front of the fork again are made from the spare ones and fixed to the mid fork lowrider brazeons.The rear has a deflector fitted and the front has a mudflap made from truck inner tube,that's within 30mm of the road surface.
With the m/guards and flaps fitted the bike and rider remain remarkably clean even in some very mucky winter conditions and the BB remains totally clean.
Here's the latest photo with some slight changes:-

Re: Pumping up 29er 2.4inch tyres

11 April 2015 - 7:46pm
reohn2 wrote:Bicycler wrote:It really doesn't take as long as you think to get wide mtb tyres up to the correct (low) pressure. It is a pain in the backside with a tiny mini pump but a decent pump should make light work of it.

BTW, the gauge version of the Mountain Morph is called the Turbo Morph (who thinks these names up?). I have that one.

There's a problem carrying a big frame fit pump on the bike,It doesn't fit anywhere ATM I'm carrying a small one in the rackpack but wondered if there was something better.I have a Mini Morph which is next to useless with big tyres


New bike R2?
Meet the Tractor :-


Yes...apart from still drooling over the bike and budgeting for a new pump (my 15 year old track pump has busticated seals) I have just got to know about those mudguards. What have you cobbled together there with all those stays? Do you get any crud catching near the BB?....b

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