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Re: New Geoff Apps prototype

9 November 2014 - 10:21am
Obviously not that interesting!

New Geoff Apps prototype

8 November 2014 - 9:30am
I've just noticed that Geoff Apps is building a new Cleland prototype, called the Landseer:

DSCF5780 by gmacleland, on Flickr

He's writing a blog about it here.

It's a fascinating project, and I'd love a go on one (or an Aventura). As the blog points out, the philosophy is very different to the usual mountain bike manufacturers. Here, the geometry is very short, very steep, very rearward-biased, high BB, high centre of gravity, hub brakes, hub gears, mudguards. Very unfashionable, but I reckon it would be brilliant for cross-country fun.

Does anyone here have a Cleland? Who'd like to build a Landseer when the plans are finalised?

Re: 20spd

5 November 2014 - 5:12pm
Since I first posted this a mate has flogged me a second hand frame at a killer price so I've just moved everything over from the old bike and am still with 3*9.

but thanks for all the info everyone......one day I'll have a new MTB move kicking and screaming into the world of 2*10, big wheels and disc brakes.

Re: 20spd

5 November 2014 - 4:31pm
You could look at the gears you most commonly use on your triple and then the usable gears on the mountain bike and work out whether you'd have to be changing regularly in normal riding. With wide range cassettes It probably isn't the issue it was with fewer sprockets and close ratios.

Re: New Bike or Upgrade?

4 November 2014 - 5:51am
i would not trust a 20 year old frame thats had plenty of use unless you are a whippet who rides very easy on stuff!

Re: 20spd

3 November 2014 - 6:56pm
hi.i run a 24/36 crank and i stay on the 36 nearly all the time,like you would on a middle ring.i only change to the 24 when the going gets really steep!

Re: 29 incher - all hype?

27 October 2014 - 9:39pm
Wesh-Laurence wrote:Virtually all of the new MTBs have 650b ie 27.5" wheels!! This means that the 29er was in fashion for 3 years.

In order to keep selling bikes year after year the manufacturers keep re inventing the wheel.

It's very annoying that manufacturers are producing products that have built in obsolescence of only 3-4 years. It is the same as regards parts, it is now very difficult to buy new suspension forks that don't have tapered steerer tubes which makes a huge number of perfectly good frames obsolete.

Not quite as faddish as you describe, of the 288 2015 mountain bikes that Evans sell 132 are 650b and 123 are 29ers, narrow that down to hardtails and the ratio is 58 vs. 82.

Re: Dog walkers or horseriders?

27 October 2014 - 9:00pm
Flinders wrote:Psamathe wrote:Accusing the behaviour of the dog as being aggressive and threatening is just ridiculous - the dog was showing play behaviour (barking is NOT a sign of aggression). I cannot understand quite why you felt threatened by the dog. Your bad language so quickly almost certainly made the situation far worse than it needed to have been. OK, the owner should have held the dog as you passed but I can see how your attitude would get her back up to be uncooperative.

Ian

You are 100% wrong there. That is clear evidence of a dog totally out of control in a public place, and posing a public danger. the cyclist can't advance on their bike without risking hitting the dog and being knocked off their bike. The person with the dog has no business to be in charge a dog at all. There was nothing playful about it's behavior. And of course barking can be a sign of aggression.
Why did the person not put the dog on the lead? Because they had no control over it. QED.
An aggressive bark is different from that in the video. The dog's manner is not that of being aggressive. Look at its mouth. Look at its tail (which would be held completely differently for any of the aggressive behaviours). If the dog were being aggressive it would have been paying far more attention to the cyclist and not wandering off when the bike was stationary. That is would rush back when the bike moved and wander off when the bike was stationary shows it is more of a chase behaviour rather than an aggressive behaviour.

Maybe the owner should have held the dog whilst the cyclist moved off but the way the rider got angry and started using bad language would have got my back-up as well and I would have been less inclined to cooperate.

In fact the cyclist was being more aggressive than the dog. Good way to get cyclists a bad reputation in my opinion. An the more people start telling their friends about the "horrid lycra louts", bad language, etc., the less cooperation we get, the less consideration drivers give, etc.

Being pleasant gets you cooperation. Being nasty does not.

Ian

Re: Dog walkers or horseriders?

27 October 2014 - 7:07pm
Hi,
On my last but one trip out on my usual training ground.
Two dogs in the road (single track, national cycle route) they see me and both come towards me barking, one growls at me (farm dogs) as I have dogs and have encountered before I shout loudly and try to pass.
One is behind me and gives up (I am at a walking pace) the other backs down the road about 50 - 70 yards constantly barking I keep shouting at it loudly, backing it into farm entrance, they I try to get away but dog is persistant, he finally gives up and I am on my way again.

If I did not shout at dog they were probably going to bite my heels or they would be under my wheel / bring me off.

I have been chased by one of these dogs several times this year.

The owners are not there as they are farm dogs, they come and go as they please.

What would you do

As I own male large dogs for over twenty years I know what to do but stopping does not make them go away.
I confront them and shout at them as I know the farmer would do the same.

Farm dogs......old blind and bored not working like sheep dog...rat catchers at best.

Re: Dog walkers or horseriders?

27 October 2014 - 6:25pm

Accusing the behaviour of the dog as being aggressive and threatening is just ridiculous - the dog was showing play behaviour (barking is NOT a sign of aggression). I cannot understand quite why you felt threatened by the dog. Your bad language so quickly almost certainly made the situation far worse than it needed to have been. OK, the owner should have held the dog as you passed but I can see how your attitude would get her back up to be uncooperative.

Ian

You are 100% wrong there. That is clear evidence of a dog totally out of control in a public place, and posing a public danger. the cyclist can't advance on their bike without risking hitting the dog and being knocked off their bike. The person with the dog has no business to be in charge a dog at all. There was nothing playful about it's behavior. And of course barking can be a sign of aggression.
Why did the person not put the dog on the lead? Because they had no control over it. QED.

Re: Off road rides, Colchester area

14 October 2014 - 8:34pm
Hi,

Friday Woods is OK and can be challenging in the wet - I've done this quite a lot over the years with my now grown up sons. They did the Boxing day bikes vs runners at the start of the year.

Alton Water as previously stated also OK

Wivenhoe trail is flat but at least off road.

Rendlesham Forest also has some good trails but not that brilliant. Usual forestry commission stuff.

Tunstall Forsest much better much info out there about them. Not tried this but told it has a wild jump zone

Thetford is possible best and has some reasonable red routes - Pretty soft compared to Wales, Scotland etc

Danbury is small but I'm told OK - tried it once, broke bike and did a fair deal of walking - Jump area plus cross country

Epping Forest is also said to be OK but not many waymarked routes - not tried this one.

Hope that helps,

Paul

Re: 29 incher - all hype?

11 October 2014 - 9:57am
26 to 29 is quite a big step. Bigger wheels roll easier especially over potholes and imperfections.

Al

Re: 29 incher - all hype?

11 October 2014 - 8:46am
Virtually all of the new MTBs have 650b ie 27.5" wheels!! This means that the 29er was in fashion for 3 years.

In order to keep selling bikes year after year the manufacturers keep re inventing the wheel.

It's very annoying that manufacturers are producing products that have built in obsolescence of only 3-4 years. It is the same as regards parts, it is now very difficult to buy new suspension forks that don't have tapered steerer tubes which makes a huge number of perfectly good frames obsolete.

MOUNTAIN Biking

10 October 2014 - 11:44pm
Check this out: http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0 ... -the-ridge. Not mountain biking but biking on mountains.

Re: Moving up from 32 tires to 38/42 - how much of a differe

3 October 2014 - 4:07pm
Hi Andrew and Bicycler,

Just to say many thanks to both of you for your replies, they're a great help.

B

Re: Moving up from 32 tires to 38/42 - how much of a differe

2 October 2014 - 3:41pm
As far as wheels are concerned, for comfort you want the lowest tyre pressure at which you don't get pinch punctures (aka snakebites) when you hit a rock or pothole. Bigger tyres allow lower pressure, and hence more comfort.
Better quality tyres with lighter, more flexible sidewalls will help a little too. Vittoria Voyager Hyper are good (37 or 40), but they are slicks and not too good on muddy sections or loose gravel.

You can also gain comfort by "riding light" for the worst bits - freewheel, hover just off the saddle by an inch or two, and a light/loose grip on the handlebars. It's too tiring to try it pedalling for very far, but can make quite a difference for short sections.

Re: 29 incher - all hype?

2 October 2014 - 9:47am
I've had a few: hated the first [a Genesis first generation]. Then I built a single speed based on a Gary Fisher Rig and it rode superbly! It quickly became the bike of choice [out of a selection of 10!]. Now I have a Salsa Fargo custom build for touring, but often pull it off the rack for local rides.

I still have 26ers and use them, but 29er are hard to beat when used for single speed or touring.

Re: Moving up from 32 tires to 38/42 - how much of a differe

1 October 2014 - 3:10pm
The cheapest thing to do is to experiment a bit with tyre pressures. If you generally just pump tyres up to the maximum pressure on the sidewall then one or both tyres are probably overinflated. If tyres are overinflated then the ride will be harsher and the tyres will grip less effectively. This document explains the science and recommends pressures for general road use: http://www.bikequarterly.com/images/TireDrop.pdf Mountain bikers or those riding rough surfaces often go for even lower pressures but for a mix of on and off road you have to find a happy medium between on and off road performance.

There is quite a bit of extra air in a 37-42mm tyre so otherwise identical wider tyres should be noticeably more comfortable (again, at the right pressure which will be lower for the wider tyre). I tend to go for the biggest tyres that will fit my 700c bikes whilst still leaving some gap between the tyre and mudguard.

Tyres are the main thing which can be changed to suit terrain. Some people find that suspension seat posts provide a worthwhile increase in comfort over bumpy terrain and some of those can be bought relatively cheaply.

Moving up from 32 tires to 38/42 - how much of a difference?

30 September 2014 - 7:28pm
Hallo,

Firstly let me say I'm new to both the forum and cycling, so apologies if this question doesn't make any sense, is on the wrong sub-forum (it's not a mountain biking question but it is related to going off-road, so I though this would be the best place) or what have you.

I recently bought a hybrid bike (Ridgeback Velocity 2015) for commuting, and am very happy with it so far as a commuting/road bike. I've also increasingly started using it for leisure rides on the weekends as well and have found a route that I like a lot; however some of the route is on a couple of miles of very badly maintained towpath (theoretically paved, but in practice just a mess), and I find cycling on this section quite bumpy and jarring. Another part of the route is a dirt and gravel track through a park; while riding the bike on this is comfortable enough, I've noticed my bike skidding a bit on the track (this may be more my riding skills than anything else). A friend suggested putting thicker tires on my bike in order to both make it a more comfortable ride on rough surfaces as well as hold better to dirt tracks and the like. The bike came with 32 tires; however I think I can go up to 38 or possible even 42. My question is, how much of a difference do you guys think putting on thicker tires would make? In particular, how much more comfortable would it make riding on the rough path? Is it worth it or is the difference not going to be particularly noticeable? Is there anything else I can do other than changing tires to address these issues?

Also, if you think it would improve my ride in these respects, are there any particular tires you'd recommend?

Many thanks.

Re: Lesser known hazards for off-road cyclists

29 September 2014 - 9:25pm
Idiots shooting a shotgun in the general direction of the Fife Coastal path. Even spent shot raining down through a tree stings.

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