CTC Forum - MTB

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Updated: 1 hour 51 min ago

Re: 20spd

6 July 2014 - 5:39pm
thanks for the feed back.
Yeah, I'm not worried about the range - it's whether I'll be continually changing between big and little ring, rather than keeping it on the middle like I do now!

Re: 20spd

6 July 2014 - 5:24pm
My first MTB was 21 speed (3x7) and rode it with no problems.
So 20 speed isn't that much different.
Biggest difference must be like 50/34 compacts where, when changing from large ring to small, makes a very big jump in gearing.

Air or sprung suspension?

6 July 2014 - 1:15pm
Air forks and rear suspension units seem to be the way ahead but what are the advantages? If you had forks and rear sus units with the correct spring rating would they perform as well as air units? Ok, you can adjust the air spring rating to adjust for changes in the weight of you and/or your kit but what are the advantages/disadvantages?

I imaging springs are heavier but air will be costlier, what else?

Re: 20spd

5 July 2014 - 7:53pm
Just finished a trip with someone who broke his frame and bought a new 20spd to continue. Said the range was good and stopped a lot of faffing about with three rings. No personal experience though!

20spd

5 July 2014 - 5:27pm
I've always used either a single chain ring (with single sprocket) or a triple (with a load of sprockets) on MTBs. Looking at getting a new MTB....but it only comes in 2x10. Any thoughts on how much of a compromise this is - have you used a double on an MTB...how did you get on with it? Do you find that you are faffing around having to change the front all the time rather than making quicker changes to the rear?

Re: Dog walkers or horseriders?

4 July 2014 - 12:07pm
Psamathe wrote:Redvee wrote:Had a run in with a dog and owner last Sunday. I tried to remain calm and polite but soon lost patience with the owner as you can probably tell from the NSFW langauge I resorted to.


Accusing the behaviour of the dog as being aggressive and threatening is just ridiculous - the dog was showing play behaviour (barking is NOT a sign of aggression). I cannot understand quite why you felt threatened by the dog. Your bad language so quickly almost certainly made the situation far worse than it needed to have been. OK, the owner should have held the dog as you passed but I can see how your attitude would get her back up to be uncooperative.

Ian
I agree that the dog was showing play behaviour, but that 'play' was interfering with Redvee's ability to commute: The dog was darting in front of him every time he started off again, attempting to prevent him moving. Sure the dog was 'playing' but that play can be very frightening for those unfamiliar with dogs - and can in some dogs lead quickly to aggression if the play is not cooperated with. Oh, and some dogs also 'nip' (i.e. bite) 'in play'; this being natural between dogs. Personally I'd have responded to the dog playfully, got hold of its harness, walked it back to the owner and requested that she keep it there until I was out of range, with an assurance that I had no intention of playing with her dog and I found the assumption that I would, offensive.

Part of the problem is the owners - and your, assumption that 'everyone' knows when a dog is playing and is happy that this is not aggression. People with no interest in dogs should not need to learn about the different aspects of dog behaviour! To say that "Accusing the behaviour of the dog as being aggressive and threatening is just ridiculous" puts the onus on Redvee to learn about dogs and that is not where the responsibility lies. Legally, if someone feels threatened by a dog (as Redvee clearly did - with good reason as Redvee is not expected to be a dog behaviour expert), then the dog is out of control*. He quite reasonably asked her to control her 'playful' dog and she refused. IMO she is morally and legally at fault (but it wasn't A Good Idea to threaten to kick the dog).

*Reference: https://www.gov.uk/control-dog-public
Controlling your dog in public wrote:Out of control

Your dog is considered dangerously out of control if it:

injures someone
makes someone worried that it might injure them

(my italics)

Re: Dog walkers or horseriders?

4 July 2014 - 11:00am
Redvee wrote:Had a run in with a dog and owner last Sunday. I tried to remain calm and polite but soon lost patience with the owner as you can probably tell from the NSFW langauge I resorted to.


Accusing the behaviour of the dog as being aggressive and threatening is just ridiculous - the dog was showing play behaviour (barking is NOT a sign of aggression). I cannot understand quite why you felt threatened by the dog. Your bad language so quickly almost certainly made the situation far worse than it needed to have been. OK, the owner should have held the dog as you passed but I can see how your attitude would get her back up to be uncooperative.

Ian

Re: Dog walkers or horseriders?

4 July 2014 - 12:20am
Had a run in with a dog and owner last Sunday. I tried to remain calm and polite but soon lost patience with the owner as you can probably tell from the NSFW langauge I resorted to.

Re: Dog walkers or horseriders?

3 July 2014 - 9:48pm
I guess mine could probably get lumped in with the "anti-motor vehicle posts blaming drivers for everything". It may seem that way if a cyclist makes a mistake and gets hit by a car and people blame cars. Instead of being anti-car people like me just view the motorists as having a much greater responsibility to other people on the roads - a duty of care if you like. Their presence and speed raise the stakes and turn something as safe as riding a bike or walking into something potentially lethal. It is not enough to say that the driver wasn't at fault like it's solely an issue of priority, the question is whether they could have forseen what happened, slowed, allowed space and prevented the collision. There is no such thing as 50/50 when one party ends up wiping the other's blood from their bonnet.

Now it would be hypocritical if we didn't apply this same logic to the tracks and trails of our countryside where we can be a danger to others enjoying their activities. Again, responsibility is not 50/50, we have a duty not to endanger others and must be prepared to slow or stop when necessary. That is not to say that we pose the same threat to pedestrians as cars do to us but we still can hurt people and animals if we hit them. We must ensure that this does not happen. The responsibility is ours.

Inconsiderate and obstructive behaviour by other path users is, of course, another matter entirely

Re: Dog walkers or horseriders?

3 July 2014 - 9:39pm
And to add, In the 9 months/2600 miles I've done around my local lanes I've seen plenty of dog walkers and passed plenty of horses (it's a horsey area). Not a single incident with a dog; most dog walkers see or hear me coming and if appropriate hold their dog by its collar whilst I pass (owners who don't have calm dogs that just ignore me). Not a single incident with horse; horse riders always say thanks (for slowing whilst passing) and exchange brief pleasantries.

In my early days I noted I was slightly disturbing the horses and one rider said it was my hi-vis waistcoat flapping in the wind so from then on I always held my hi-vis waistcoat to stop the flapping whilst passing horses and no issues.

Ian

Re: Dog walkers or horseriders?

3 July 2014 - 9:32pm
MDC wrote:Who gets your vote for the most irritating?
Abstain ... because our countryside should be for everybody to enjoy and we need to be considerate to all users.

So often on this forum there are "anti-motor vehicles" posts blaming drivers for anything and everything. Now we are "blaming" dog walkers and "blaming" horse riders. It is sounding like cyclists want everybody else to just get off everything and everywhere and have everything turned over for the exclusive use of cyclists.

A disappointing question.

Ian

Re: Dog walkers or horseriders?

3 July 2014 - 9:21pm
Mark1978 wrote:Dirk wrote:When I ride off road, my dog usually comes along with me. She's better behaved than many of the other mountain bikers I come across. As for horses, our local stretch of the Sustrans route is absolutely covered in horse ****.

The thing is you have no idea when approaching the dog if it's well behaved or some idiot dog who's going to run in front of you. The owners often get upset with your caution too being like "he's ok!!" Of course I've had situations where the owners have shouted that their dog is well behaved and then it's ran in front of me

And yeah a few times a particularly narrow bit of path and a horse crap pile about a foot high and difficult to avoid. Nasty

The thing is that you have no idea when a mountain bike approaches you if they are considerate and are willing to share the shared space and slow down or they are ignorant and just want to see how close they can pass you at speed.

I had to get a dog put to sleep last year because a mountain biker rode into her. She was close to my side on a wide path at Rivington. A large group of bikers approached and passed on all sides at considerable speed and collided with my dog. I did find out which group it was and complained to them ( by the way the group are CTC) registered. By just go a simple thank you for you comment we will look into it then nowt.

I can only presume that these type of mountain bikers never ride on the road, because if they did they would understand how it feels to be closely passed at speed by something bigger than them.

If you are approaching walkers etc why can't you slow down?

26" folder

3 July 2014 - 2:33pm
Time to rationalise the bikes. I'm mostly on road but use the mountain bike occassionally on rough tracks and expect to use it on moorland tracks now that my son lives in north yorks. I don't drive after health issues so use the rain from time to time, but more likely is for my wife to drive us, but she won't drive with the bike rack on the car. I think a folder will be practical for my uses. It won't be wild downhill stuff. I'll use it in winter too as I've got 26" winter stud tyres for commuting I know Dahon did one but the only 26" I can find is the Espresso which seems more of an urban bike than off- roader. Montague seem to get good reviews, but seem a bit pricey for the amount of use I'll get Are there others worth considering?

Re: Trail Manners?

2 July 2014 - 10:12pm
Unfortunately, a walk around Rivington on a weekend and you run the gauntlet of the woolyback mountain bike club, who have some really inconsiderate members who do exactly the same as what was mentioned in the OP but on footpaths and bridleways.

Re: 29 incher - all hype?

1 July 2014 - 2:19pm
It will take you more rides than you think to fully conveince you, but :
- If you are not too short
- You do not ride 100% very techy, tight course

Then you will love them in the end !

22nd June 2014: A ride to Great Langdale

29 June 2014 - 10:44pm
Joe and Howard a bit further along the cycle path in Pull Woods. by simeonorme, on Flickr

You can see rest of 22nd June ride photos of the ride to Great Langdale at this link http://www.southlakesgroup.org.uk/2014photogallery/june/22nd.html

Re: 29 incher - all hype?

28 June 2014 - 1:56pm
Thanks for the tip for the Neoguard - just fitted one this morning.

Re: 29 incher - all hype?

27 June 2014 - 5:18pm
Unless it's well designed like a Karate Monkey or Canfield.....

Re: 29 incher - all hype?

27 June 2014 - 3:18pm
A lot also depends on your height - if you are over 6' then there will be few compromises on frame sizing. I'm 5'7" and on a road bike I get tyre overlap on 700c - a 29er MTB will be worse or have some odd geometry to get the wheels to fit.

Re: Singlespeeding

26 June 2014 - 3:38pm
I'm on 33:19 on my 29er.
Used 33:17 at first and managed some pretty hilly rides but the new gear is better overall I think.

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