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Updated: 17 min 53 sec ago

Re: Should I just stick with 26" wheels?

19 March 2015 - 3:33pm
Can we stick to one sizing convention? This talk of 27s is making me dizzy. My 27" rims are bigger diameter than my 28 and 29" rims (which conveniently happen to be exactly the same diameter as each other)

Re: Should I just stick with 26" wheels?

19 March 2015 - 2:17pm
Cripes this is just like the .175 vs .22 debate in the airgun world. Now the debate is about a .20 calibre! Naff all choice of ammo in that size.

I'm short: My last bike was small but with 700s. My newest bike is small with 27s. All the rest have been MBs with 27s. In my limited experience I prefer the fit of my bikes with 27s and I like the choice of tyres you get.

I can't see much in it so as one good man has said already: It's you who has the wallet and it's you and your bones who knows what's going to fit best...b

Re: Should I just stick with 26" wheels?

19 March 2015 - 12:08pm
Just read an article in a mtb marketing rag in a waiting room. Forget about 29" wheels the future is apparently 27.5+, this being a 650b wheel with a large volume tyre on it to bring the outer diameter up to 29".

How many years before we read about the real benefits of the 26+ wheel, ie a small strong wheel with a large volume tyre to bring the outer diameter up to whatever 650b corresponds to? As long as the clearances are such that you have to buy a new frame...

Re: wessex ridgeway

18 March 2015 - 9:47pm
Thank you

Re: Are mtb tyres changing?

11 March 2015 - 1:17pm
It wasn't a snow specific tyre - meant for claggy mud more than anything, and very good at it it was.

Re: Are mtb tyres changing?

11 March 2015 - 9:28am
Si wrote:Did you ever try the old panracer Spike? The one with the health warning on it telling you that the tread was so extreme that you were sure to die if you used it on the road

Very good in sand, mud or snow. It was usable on the road but progress was not fast to say the least, and laying the bike down in tight bends was to be avoided!

I never bothered as I always ended up riding very mixed terrain. It made sense if you lived somewhere with snowfall standing for a while. Probably nowadays fatbikes are a better solution.

Re: wessex ridgeway

10 March 2015 - 9:14pm
Great campsite opposite Champernhayes - summer only but you never know.

http://www.brigsfarmcamping.co.uk/

Re: Burly blokes on the pavement - why?

10 March 2015 - 3:33pm
mrjemm wrote:Bicycler wrote:I've heard very occasional comments whilst using towpaths and bridleways from walkers convinced that bicycles weren't allowed. Even then it's been an overheard comment rather than anybody directly challenging me.

I've noticed these are often commented in a rather loud way, kinda passive-aggressive, not wanting to challenge, but wanting you to hear way. In a very similar way to "Ooh, they don't ever have bells any more, do they Deirdre?". Very popular style of comment on the Lune path and canalside between Lanc and Hest Bank... I fitted a bell some time ago purely to counter this effect even though I prefer to use my voice and so now use both, even though I actually think the bell less polite/pleasant.
Yes, I nearly described it as a stage whisper.

I suspect walkers who don't cycle or ride horses pay very little attention to access for these users. Every path is to their mind a footpath.

You can't win with bells. Half the grumps in the population object to cyclists calling out to them, they expect cyclists to have bells and use them, the remainder of the grumps consider use of bells to be a rude "get outta my way" even when rung in good time by a slowing cyclist, they would prefer cyclists to speak to them. I've given up worrying.

Re: Burly blokes on the pavement - why?

10 March 2015 - 11:00am
Bicycler wrote:I've heard very occasional comments whilst using towpaths and bridleways from walkers convinced that bicycles weren't allowed. Even then it's been an overheard comment rather than anybody directly challenging me.

I've noticed these are often commented in a rather loud way, kinda passive-aggressive, not wanting to challenge, but wanting you to hear way. In a very similar way to "Ooh, they don't ever have bells any more, do they Deirdre?". Very popular style of comment on the Lune path and canalside between Lanc and Hest Bank... I fitted a bell some time ago purely to counter this effect even though I prefer to use my voice and so now use both, even though I actually think the bell less polite/pleasant.

...BTW, cycling is permitted in many "pedestrian" areas. If cycling is prohibited there should be a no cycling sign or no vehicle sign (red circle with nothing inside). Cycling is perfectly legal in pedestrian zones where there is only a "no motor vehicles" sign (motorbike above a car inside a red circle)

Interestingly, this was on my mind yesterday in Lancaster. The section of Penny Street between the Penny Bank and Radio Shack, has long been OK to cycle on, and has the blue signs- https://goo.gl/maps/217f7 whilst onwards into town was until recently bearing no cycling signs. Now it's time limited at 10am to 5pm IIRC, which interested me, though I am pretty sure it used to be OK to cycle through town. Guess it changes with the mood of the people and by extension, the council.

reohn2 wrote:...FWIW last summer Mrs R2 and I were on the tandem on Morecambe prom(wide shared use)we'd ridden up from Glasson Dock,unbeknown to us there was some kind of 'do' on and it was packed with people dressed up in various forties and fifties clothes.
We rode slowly and considerately through the crowds,and stopped at a vacant bench to take in the spectacle,we were amazed at the number of cyclists of all ages carving their way through the crowds in what I would consider a dangerous fashion.
So I can see a little old lady's point,it's the few idiots(once again)who spoil it for the rest.

Normal on Morecambe Prom. As you know, I use it regularly, and am very wary of other users, but often observe many other riders using pedestrians as if cones on a slalom course, or just swooshing on by them. Yes, some are of the squeaky sprung thing with a scowl on board, but just as many are lyclad roadoids. It's all about not having any consideration for others. Tis though the same on the roads there; indicators, lane discipline and patience at junctions do not exist in the few square miles, centered about the nexus of this- Torrisholme carvery roundabout.

Re: wessex ridgeway

9 March 2015 - 9:17pm
Yes, thanks. I rode it from Lyme a few years back and this section to Champernhayes is walkers only. Tough going by bike walked a lot of it. Such a shame they've not upgraded this bit.
I just thought maybe someone has uploaded the route to some site?
Setting off from Tollard Royal Mar 28.

Re: Burly blokes on the pavement - why?

9 March 2015 - 8:03pm
Bicycler wrote:I don't disagree about the poor behaviour of many cyclists around pedestrians, though I will point out that the other major difference is the way in which cyclists in this country are generally expected to share busy, narrow and most importantly, unsegregated routes with pedestrians in a way which wouldn't be normal in other countries. To an extent we expect our urban cyclists to show common sense and restraint to avoid conflict where other countries would design out the conflict to begin with.
I don't know about that,in towns and city centres in France,Italy,NL and Spain cyclists and pedestrians do quite well mixing together especially in Italy(Tuscany) where streets are quite narrow.
Equally so drivers treat cyclists with greater respect in those countries.

......... The young are assumed to be up to no good and are tarred with the same brush regardless of what they do.

Not by me,I try to have respect for anyone I meet from the very young to the very old,it's only when they don't respect me or their environment I have something to say.

Re: Chains n' stuff

9 March 2015 - 8:01pm
Doing the sums suggests saving on new chains is a false economy. You are allowing a cheap part to wear out expensive ones. Keep on top of cleaning and replace chains as they show signs of wear and you can get several chain-lives out of a cassette and several cassette-lives out of a chainring/set. The only exception is where you are confident about having to replace the whole shebang, you might as well do as you did and keep the old chain going.

Chain gauges are fine but a decent metal rule is more than adequate

Re: wessex ridgeway

9 March 2015 - 7:27pm
I don't think too much of it is open to bikes. I walked a bit of it from Lyme Regis and I am pretty sure it was mostly public footpath. IIRC correctly it was well signed though so navigation without GPS should be okay.

Re: Burly blokes on the pavement - why?

9 March 2015 - 7:18pm
reohn2 wrote:Sorry for the delay in replying I'd missed your post.
and I missed your reply. It's easy to miss posts on this section of the forum.

I don't disagree about the poor behaviour of many cyclists around pedestrians, though I will point out that the other major difference is the way in which cyclists in this country are generally expected to share busy, narrow and most importantly, unsegregated routes with pedestrians in a way which wouldn't be normal in other countries. To an extent we expect our urban cyclists to show common sense and restraint to avoid conflict where other countries would design out the conflict to begin with.

I don't get much grief either. I've had the occasional altercation with drivers who didn't understand that "no motor vehicles" and "except cycles" plates allowed me to use a route they couldn't. I've heard very occasional comments whilst using towpaths and bridleways from walkers convinced that bicycles weren't allowed. Even then it's been an overheard comment rather than anybody directly challenging me. On the other hand I am conscious that my experiences may not be typical. The treatment and perceptions of you and I may differ from that of many urban cyclists due to our age. The young are assumed to be up to no good and are tarred with the same brush regardless of what they do.

wessex ridgeway

9 March 2015 - 6:42pm
Are there any GPX files to upload to garmin for this route? anyone? Thanks

Re: Chains n' stuff

9 March 2015 - 12:34pm
The lengthening on a chain is definitely wear. In fact you can feel it if you you push two links of a worn chain together - there is a little play.

Having crashed painfully yesterday due to a broken chain when accelerating hard out of the saddle, do yourself a favour and replace it...and sadly all the drivetrain.

A chain checker is a sound investment. Occasionally you can get one of those muddy clayey rides which destroys a chain in 50 miles. Using the checker will save your chainrings and cogs.

Re: Chains n' stuff

9 March 2015 - 11:41am
I have a chain gauge but I get conflicting advice as to what they are actually measuring. Some say stretch some say what they are actually measuring is wear. Either way the chain is definitely longer and more flexible so I guess it is a bit of both. My dilemma with chains and wear is this. Change the chain regularly before it stretches too much and wears the cassette out or wear both together and then replace them at the same time?

I had this dilemma with my road bike last year when I tried to change the old chain for a new one. Trouble was when I put a new chain on the old and slightly worn cassette it started to slip . So I put the old chain back on and my intention was to continue to run the old chain on the old cassette until that started slipping then change the whole lot together. (New chain, new cassette and possibly new small chain ring on the front).

A year on and the old chain and cassette on the road bike are still working fine although the chain is now very worn (the larger of the chain gauges, 1.0, now fits comfortably between the teeth) and the indexing is a little sloppy. I am intending to do the first leg of LJOG this summer (Lands end - S Wales) and after the chain broke on my MTB the other day was wondering if I shouldn't just replace the transmission on the road bike now and have done with it. MTB chains take a lot more strain that road bike chains but there are some pretty steep hills on the N Cornish coast.

BTW I have changed the chain on the MTB for a new one. If it slips on the old cassette then that will get replaced as well.

Re: Chains n' stuff

9 March 2015 - 10:31am
Harnell wrote:That is what I was thinking. It is just that looking at the chain it doesn't look as though it is about to give out and it was a very steep bit I was trying to get up but I guess you can't tell just by looking at a chain which link is about to give. As a chain wears the links get thinner and thinner making failure more and more likely so time to bite the bullet and splash the cash me thinks.
Or you can just take a few powerlinks with every time you go out, and see how you get on? I guess there's a fair chance it will break again soon, but maybe you can put off replacing it all for a bit.

p.s. sod's law says that the chain will be fine until are in a hurry to get somewhere.

p.p.s. I would probably replace it. Or at least order the bits.

Re: Chains n' stuff

9 March 2015 - 10:02am
Stretch is the best measure. A £10 chain gauge is a great investment.

Re: Chains n' stuff

9 March 2015 - 9:15am
That is what I was thinking. It is just that looking at the chain it doesn't look as though it is about to give out and it was a very steep bit I was trying to get up but I guess you can't tell just by looking at a chain which link is about to give. As a chain wears the links get thinner and thinner making failure more and more likely so time to bite the bullet and splash the cash me thinks.

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