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Updated: 1 hour 32 min ago

Re: Shame more don't take this stance with traffic offences.

24 August 2015 - 11:57pm
He should be ok cycling to his job at Sainsbury's although i don't think anyone makes a 'Kitchen knife bike mount' as of yet!? hopefuly next time he is drunk he will just curl up under a bush for the night.

I can see the brother making a big insurance claim for his injuries and the idiots insurance going sky high not that anything will actually stop him driving a vehicle while he is banned

Re: Shame more don't take this stance with traffic offences.

24 August 2015 - 11:31pm
"...and a requirement to attend a thinking skills programme."
Don't know why I find that so funny.

Re: Shoreham air crash

24 August 2015 - 11:12pm
maxglide wrote:I dont recall any facility to do this, my memory is that the tow "rope" was just attached to the back of the tug and nothing can be done to it until it lands. The most I can conceive of is an emergency release handle like the glider has but that would just drop the rope to the ground.

The tow rope remains attached to the tug. There's no release facility. Only the glider can release the rope from the hook up. On an aerotow, when the glider releases, he turns left, the tug turns right. When the tug lands the rope is more or less trailing horizontally behind so, no chance of hooking something on the approach.

I looked it up, and of course you are all correct- the tow line stays o the plane. However, the book I checked out says this (It seems to be American so the rules may be different, but the physics would be the same:
Approach and Landing
A 200-foot tow line hangs down behind the tow plane at a 30 to 40 degree angle. The altitude of the tow plane must be adjusted to ensure the tow line does not become entangled in obstructions at close proximity to the ground.Ensure you are thoroughly briefed and familiar with the obstructions around the airport, especially obstructions on the approach end of the runway to be used. Briefings should include a minimum above ground level (AGL) obstruction crossing height and any factors that may influence altitude udgment, such as visual illusions or other airport distractions.
Landing with the tow line attached is not prohibited by
regulation; however, the following points should be considered:
1.
Obstructions are cleared by more than the tow line length (altimeter lag considered).
2.
The field is well turfed. It is simply inviting early tow line failure from abrasion to land with the tow line on hard ground or paved runways. Landing with the tow line should never be attempted unless the field has clear approaches and is at least 2,500 feet in length.

Other situations require the tow line to be dropped.........
(ctd.)

Re: Shoreham air crash

24 August 2015 - 11:11pm
Flinders wrote:TonyR wrote:Psamathe wrote:Re: Shoreham Tragedy
Radio 4 Today program had some official from CAA this morning and he didn't handle the interview well. He did comment about their safety record (which he said was good) but fell down badly when asked why the CAA would wait for the AAIB report (which can often take ages and ages) before reviewing the airshow regulations. The interviewer's point was that whatever the cause, accidents clearly do happen so, irrespective of the cause he maintained the CAA should be reviewing procedures to remove/lower than risk now rather than wait ages (by e.g. moving such displays over where there are no people. CAA guy's response was that they rather wanted to stop such accidents (hence waiting for AAIB) whereas interviewer was arguing to act now to reduce risk for public (and there will always be a risk of accidents in these types of display). Interviewer came across better as he was arguing that the particular display should have been carried out over the sea (something I guess cannot be done for all airshows e.g. inland ones).

Ian

The usual something must be done knee jerk response. Tragic as they are these are the first spectator/public deaths in an air display in the UK in over 60 years. How about instead doing something about the quarter of a million plus violent deaths of members of the public over that time from road accidents. They've had plenty of time to think about an answer to that one.

It seems to me that the CAA have simply done exactly what they should do- ground the aircraft type until it is known if there was a fault on the aircraft, and limit flying activities in case there was an issue with the display itself. Until they have more information about what happened, what else could they have done?
Taken a while to develop, I'd say - introduced in 1954, last in active service last year!

Re: Shoreham air crash

24 August 2015 - 11:00pm
TonyR wrote:Psamathe wrote:Re: Shoreham Tragedy
Radio 4 Today program had some official from CAA this morning and he didn't handle the interview well. He did comment about their safety record (which he said was good) but fell down badly when asked why the CAA would wait for the AAIB report (which can often take ages and ages) before reviewing the airshow regulations. The interviewer's point was that whatever the cause, accidents clearly do happen so, irrespective of the cause he maintained the CAA should be reviewing procedures to remove/lower than risk now rather than wait ages (by e.g. moving such displays over where there are no people. CAA guy's response was that they rather wanted to stop such accidents (hence waiting for AAIB) whereas interviewer was arguing to act now to reduce risk for public (and there will always be a risk of accidents in these types of display). Interviewer came across better as he was arguing that the particular display should have been carried out over the sea (something I guess cannot be done for all airshows e.g. inland ones).

Ian

The usual something must be done knee jerk response. Tragic as they are these are the first spectator/public deaths in an air display in the UK in over 60 years. How about instead doing something about the quarter of a million plus violent deaths of members of the public over that time from road accidents. They've had plenty of time to think about an answer to that one.

It seems to me that the CAA have simply done exactly what they should do- ground the aircraft type until it is known if there was a fault on the aircraft, and limit flying activities in case there was an issue with the display itself. Until they have more information about what happened, what else could they have done?

Re: Shame more don't take this stance with traffic offences.

24 August 2015 - 10:56pm
I commuted by bike for a year between Torquay and Brixham and it is indeed a very lovely ride. IIRC it is not as flat as the judge seems to think and there is a very substantial hill between Paignton and Brixham, so he will be able to thank the judge in a year's time for the improvement in his fitness

Re: How much does luggage slow you down?

24 August 2015 - 9:49pm
Does the weight of the rider make a difference? For example an extra 5k of luggage is proprtinally a much larger increase for a rider weighing 60k than one riding 80k, and therefore conceivably could have a different effect on performance

Re: Shoreham air crash

24 August 2015 - 9:31pm
NATURAL ANKLING wrote:Hi,
Brucey wrote:the CAA has banned 'high energy aerobatics' in vintage jets at airshows, over land.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-34044383

cheers

Not to do something like or similar would be bad.

I remember when we had something similar and the plane crashed into a crowd of spectators.
Then they banned aerobatics / flying over a crowd, makes sense to do all flying adjacent not over people at all, roads included.

Heard from an authority man on BBC that Private owned non forces aren't allowed ejectors as the contain explosives........so do air bags and seat belt retarders

Today a BBC reporter / yesterday even that there were explosives in the ejector seat so police will take some time clearing up:?
AIUI they are allowed in non-military planes, but because they have to go thro' an inspection and certification regime are usually disarmed.

Re: Shoreham air crash

24 August 2015 - 9:25pm
Hi,
Brucey wrote:the CAA has banned 'high energy aerobatics' in vintage jets at airshows, over land.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-34044383

cheers

Not to do something like or similar would be bad.

I remember when we had something similar and the plane crashed into a crowd of spectators.
Then they banned aerobatics / flying over a crowd, makes sense to do all flying adjacent not over people at all, roads included.

Heard from an authority man on BBC that Private owned non forces aren't allowed ejectors as the contain explosives........so do air bags and seat belt retarders

Today a BBC reporter / yesterday even that there were explosives in the ejector seat so police will take some time clearing up:?

Re: Shoreham air crash

24 August 2015 - 8:55pm
It was only a week ago that we had Airbourne down here in Eastbourne, which is a free for all event, and given that Shoreham airport is quite close to us I hope that after this tragedy the organisers of both events can get together to arrange a combined event down here.

It really would make sense as planes could do their displays and tricks more safely here as they would be doing them over the sea and away from busy roads.

I join everyone else in expressing my deepest sympathies to all those affected by this horrendous incident.

Re: Road Rage as Performance Art

24 August 2015 - 8:52pm
Forgive me Oh though great Jehovah,but I can't help myself!

The article itself is ART and the following is High(comedic) art....
Man on pavement 2015
and
The YouTube comments on this—and much of the discussion in general, really, since it went viral—are focused on deciding who is right and who is wrong, breaking this road rage incident down into a simple good vs. evil, bikes vs. cars campaign.

But to focus on that is to take away from the true heart of this video, and that is that it is the most beautiful thing any recent generation has ever produced

Are priceless!

Road Rage as Performance Art

24 August 2015 - 8:08pm
I'm amazed I haven't noticed this video posted here, since it went up on Youtube July 31, but Mrs. M-k found it posted on an arts blog:

http://www.vice.com/read/a-brief-overanalysis-of-that-road-rage-video-where-that-guy-smashes-his-face-on-a-pavement-606?utm_source=vicefbus

and indeed the artistic analysis is a lovely bit of writing and should not be missed. (Strong language warning for both the article and the video … but trust me — it's worth it.)

I don't usually immerse myself in videos of people behaving badly — they just make me gloomy. This one, however, is in a class by itself. Although there is a deep underlying sadness to all incidents of road rage, there is something life-affirming and joyous to this video. Mrs. M-k and I sat side by side watching it, cheering at the end — glad we ride bicycles, firmly convinced that justice can prevail and that there is a God after all

Re: Shoreham air crash

24 August 2015 - 7:55pm
Psamathe wrote:Re: Shoreham Tragedy
Radio 4 Today program had some official from CAA this morning and he didn't handle the interview well. He did comment about their safety record (which he said was good) but fell down badly when asked why the CAA would wait for the AAIB report (which can often take ages and ages) before reviewing the airshow regulations. The interviewer's point was that whatever the cause, accidents clearly do happen so, irrespective of the cause he maintained the CAA should be reviewing procedures to remove/lower than risk now rather than wait ages (by e.g. moving such displays over where there are no people. CAA guy's response was that they rather wanted to stop such accidents (hence waiting for AAIB) whereas interviewer was arguing to act now to reduce risk for public (and there will always be a risk of accidents in these types of display). Interviewer came across better as he was arguing that the particular display should have been carried out over the sea (something I guess cannot be done for all airshows e.g. inland ones).

Ian

The usual something must be done knee jerk response. Tragic as they are these are the first spectator/public deaths in an air display in the UK in over 60 years. How about instead doing something about the quarter of a million plus violent deaths of members of the public over that time from road accidents. They've had plenty of time to think about an answer to that one.

Re: Shoreham air crash

24 August 2015 - 7:04pm
Ben@Forest wrote: To some extent I agree (though of course I presume he was not directly involved with the running of the Shoreham show). However I would like to consider myself as pretty experienced and knowledgeable in my field, but if faced with a barrage of questions from an attack dog like Humphreys (and to a lesser extent Naughtie) I might not perform well - especially if what I said might impact upon others in my line of business. I like the Today programme but Humphreys in particular is a sanctimonious git.

+1 Well said.

Re: Has anyone got the link?

24 August 2015 - 6:34pm
That' the one - cheers.
I have a friend recovering from broken back/neck after cycling accident - he might find it interesting.

Re: Shoreham air crash

24 August 2015 - 6:32pm
the CAA has banned 'high energy aerobatics' in vintage jets at airshows, over land.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-34044383

cheers

Re: Has anyone got the link?

24 August 2015 - 6:11pm

Has anyone got the link?

24 August 2015 - 6:05pm
Looking for the programme about the guy who climbed Ventoux three times in a day after major surgery - spine operation. Scottish chap who used to karate, then Bobsleigh and run. Sure I picked it up on here somewhere and watched it.

Re: How much does luggage slow you down?

24 August 2015 - 5:46pm
My average, as calculated by my Garmin, is generally 2 - 3 mph slower when touring (camping, up to 17 Kgs) than when riding without luggage. Of course that accounts for other factors than additional weight alone, but it allows me to understand and plan my routes better!

Re: Shame more don't take this stance with traffic offences.

24 August 2015 - 5:12pm
FWIW,IMHO the sentence is too lenient.

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