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Updated: 20 min 10 sec ago

Re: Allow slowing down signal with either arm?

20 January 2015 - 8:09pm
don1 wrote:I used a hand signal to slow down the other day and a driver behind me hurled abuse at me and repeatedly honked their horn because they didn't recognise it.Exactly my point.

No-one knows or understands hand signals any more.
........... or if they do, there are precious few of them out there.

Re: Fog lights

20 January 2015 - 8:02pm
light infringements, like the kid i saw on the bike tonight weaving amongst traffic, no lights in the dark

Re: Female Cyclist Death In North London

20 January 2015 - 6:24pm
What is so disappointing is that technology to avoid many of these tragedies is cheap and commonplace. We have the technology i.e. we don't need to wait for some magic futuristic invention; it is cheap to fit and easy to use. So why don't we ? Even if just for UK registered lorries ?

Answer: our politicians are too busy trying to score points off each other e.g at that national embarrassment call Prime Ministers Question Time that they can't pull their fingers out to create some new legislation requiring such devices to be fitted to lorries, etc.

So apart from the specifics of each incident, I place a lot of blame of the politicians who really need to pull their fingers out. And depressingly I am 100% sure they will continue playing their silly PM Question Time games, etc.

Ian

Re: Getting home after a puncture

20 January 2015 - 6:20pm
eileithyia wrote:Plastic, but i did also bend a key that i tried to use as a substitute.....
Ha! Never, ever, use a key as a tyre lever! Especially not your front door key. Locksmith call-outs are expensive!

Re: Getting home after a puncture

20 January 2015 - 6:18pm
hondated wrote:Pete I have also had to do that and was disappointed on how many vehicles passed me driven by people that must have clearly seen the problem I had.I can guarantee that there is no way I wouldn't spot a cyclist with such a problem even if I was on my motorbike.
As I recall (remember this was years and years ago) I was passed by a couple of roadies who stopped and offered every sympathy, but there was nothing they could do. I wasn't about to ask "You don't happen to have a spare hub about you, by any chance? And can you do me a quick wheel re-build?"

This was long before the days of mobile phones, and anyway my finances in those days (i.e. impoverished student) wouldn't have run to a taxi. As I scooted along the pavement, I wouldn't have given any passing motorists a hint of my predicament. So no blame to them. I got home, at any rate.

Re: Female Cyclist Death In North London

20 January 2015 - 6:08pm
There is no justification for either assumption. Read the Evening Standard article carefully: there was a key witness (the scaffolder, also driving a lorry) but he was either being careful not to disclose too much information to the Press, or genuinely uncertain. Whichever, he does not settle the matter. Nor should we.

Re: Female Cyclist Death In North London

20 January 2015 - 5:44pm
hondated wrote:....................This message has been written in a fit of pique because..........................

.................I'm assuming that the cyclist undertook the lorry not that the lorry overtook the cyclist.

Re: Female Cyclist Death In North London

20 January 2015 - 5:43pm
eileithyia wrote:So so so tragic yet again. But given that we do not know the full facts perhaps too soon apportion blame. Surprising part is the fact the driver was not arrested, as it is usual in a fatality to arrest the driver, initially.
I don't know whether it is 'usual'. Possible if the police were satisfied that there was no risk of the driver absconding, and his/her name/address details checked out, and there was no accusation at the time of an arrestable offence, they wouldn't have detained him/her.

What's more important is the outcome of the inquest and any Court proceedings.

Re: Female Cyclist Death In North London

20 January 2015 - 5:35pm
Flinders wrote:kwackers wrote:hondated wrote:I should add here that by saying this I am in no way assuming that this is what this young lady did
I'd say your entire rant is based around cyclists being at fault and the only reason your disclaimer exists is because it'd be bad form to blame this particular cyclist at this time.

Exactly.
If we're talking about what generally happens, it might be a better idea to tell truck drivers not to overtake cyclists near junctions.
As a driver, even though I only drive a car, I don't overtake cyclists close to junctions. As a cyclist I would not undertake a truck near a junction. Trucks have overtaken me near junctions when I've been cycling.
Given you admit to never having driven an HGV you have no understanding of getting such a vehicle around a corner. Anyone that has would know for instance its in most cases easier to get an artic around a corner than it is a 6 or 8 wheeler. Your probably need to Goggle " 6 or 8 wheeler as you wouldn't know what they are.

Re: Getting home after a puncture

20 January 2015 - 5:34pm
661-Pete wrote:eileithyia wrote:... when tyre lever broke....Plastic tyre levers are an abomination. Straight in the bin is the only place.

On the other hand, if you succeeded in breaking a metal lever, you have my respect...

Plastic, but i did also bend a key that i tried to use as a substitute.....

Re: Female Cyclist Death In North London

20 January 2015 - 5:32pm
So so so tragic yet again. But given that we do not know the full facts perhaps too soon apportion blame. Surprising part is the fact the driver was not arrested, as it is usual in a fatality to arrest the driver, initially.

Re: Female Cyclist Death In North London

20 January 2015 - 5:27pm
kwackers wrote:hondated wrote:I should add here that by saying this I am in no way assuming that this is what this young lady did
I'd say your entire rant is based around cyclists being at fault and the only reason your disclaimer exists is because it'd be bad form to blame this particular cyclist at this time. [/quote
Kwackers you can assume what you want as far as I am concerned. But without looking at all the evidence none of us are able to place the blame on anyone's shoulders.
However what I do know is there are two families tonight that are experiencing great distress. And I can tell you from personal experience that when you lose a loved one at a young age through a road traffic accident or even been involved in that lose it stays with you all of your life.

Re: Female Cyclist Death In North London

20 January 2015 - 3:51pm
It saddens me to say this, but I personally can't see anything changing until things get much, much worse.

Re: Cyclist Assaulted By Taylor Landscaping Worker

20 January 2015 - 3:51pm
Psamathe wrote:I would agree, except a lot must depend on the detail. For example, did the cyclist present the Police with the video when he reported the incident ? (Maybe he called in at the station on his way home and only downloaded the video later). Many possible reasons and I would not be expecting the Police to be trawling Video Sharing social web sites.

I can appreciate how the Police would need somebody to "complain". After all, with just a viral video, who is to say it is not a drama student project to illustrate what is maybe too common in the UK. I assume they need somebody to submit the evidence and to declare its validity. (Remember "War of the Worlds" in the US, 1938?).

Ian

I'd agree that if the police weren't shown the video when the cyclist first reported it in December then yes.
But I'd think it's highly likely he did,and that was my assumption though I could be wrong.

I wouldn't think the police trawl Youtube etc looking for offenders,as they only need to trawl the streets for a 'war of the worlds' opportunity .

Re: Female Cyclist Death In North London

20 January 2015 - 3:48pm
No - we need to actually penalise drivers who kill, and more importantly those who fail to overtake safely.

Many of these incidents are people who were cycling along happily, not filtering, and then get left hooked anyway.

Average speeds in London are so slow that a cycle is generally the fastest thing on the road anyway.

Cycle training should be brought back in at a schools level, with opportunities for adults to attend courses as well, but the onus shouldn't be on the person being shot - it should be on the person doing the shooting.

Re: Female Cyclist Death In North London

20 January 2015 - 3:47pm
hondated wrote:I should add here that by saying this I am in no way assuming that this is what this young lady did
I'd say your entire rant is based around cyclists being at fault and the only reason your disclaimer exists is because it'd be bad form to blame this particular cyclist at this time.

Re: Female Cyclist Death In North London

20 January 2015 - 3:43pm
hondated wrote:I say that because the first thing I learnt was to not cycle up the inside of motorised vehicles

Yet 99% of the current cycling infrastructure encourages us to do just that by placing cycle lanes on the left of the road and the highway code itself makes provision for bicycles to filter past traffic.

Personally, I don't know the answer. I've filtered on both the left and right of traffic with both of them having issues

Filtering on the left leaves you vulnerable to the dreaded left hook because of the simple fact very few drivers check to their left when turning. Filtering on the right leaves you exposed to being undertaken if the traffic moves and getting plenty of abusive shouts informing you to 'use the cycle lane' or 'get on the right side of the road'

My personal approach to filtering at junctions is simple. I will filter on the approach to a junction but only to the third car queing from the junction. That means I have plenty of time on the signal change to get across the junction without being caught coming up the left hand side of a car just as the lights change.

Essentially, I make sure that I am always in front or behind a vehicle when the traffic moves and not alongside them which is where the issues come.

The big failing though is that on several occasions I have been stationary sat behind a vehicle only for another one to come up alongside me and this is where taking primary at junctions is SO important. I never want a vehicle alongside me at a junction.

Of course, taking primary then provokes the driver stuck behind you to angrily beep their horn(especially at busy junctions with short light sequences where drivers frequently jump red lights or accelerate through ambers), shout abuse or attempt a dangerous maneuver, to claw back the 5 second delay you're causing him, safe in the knowledge that even if something fatal happens he can use the SMIDSY excuse to avoid all responsibility or legal punishment.

There is no solution any changes to law or highway code can achieve in my opinion because of the simple fact that there are no police around to enforce them and catch people breaking them so it becomes a 'your word against theirs' case which is impossible to convict on.

When I first started driving many moons ago police were on the roads pulling people over for unsafe driving, red light jumping, cutting up, not indicating, etc so you drove well because you never knew when one would be around.

Nowadays drivers only have to worry about speed/bus lane/red light camera's so all the other dangerous habits are now common place as they can't be enforced by cameras and there's no police on the road.

Another problem, and i'm not trying to be right wing here, is the amount of people on the roads nowadays who have never passed a UK driving test and got their licences in countries with almost non existent road laws and driving tests.

IMO, anyone without a UK licence driving in this country should be given a time limited 'visa' to allow them to drive. This will allow holidaymakers to drive but once the visa expires(i.e you are not a holiday maker) you should then be required to pass some form of UK test to esnure you know how to drive in the UK

... bit of a rant there!

Re: Getting home after a puncture

20 January 2015 - 3:18pm
661-Pete wrote:Some roadside mechanicals - such as broken cranks: something which my son seems to specialise in - are usually utterly beyond repair at the roadside. How many people are going to carry a spare crankset?

My worst - many years ago in the days of screw-on freewheels, pre-cassettes - was when I stripped the thread on the hub which took the freewheel, piling up a 1-in-5* with maximum effort. Absolutely nothing I could do about that. It was on a sunday, and in those days everything closed on a sunday. I got home - several miles - by a combination of freewheeling down any hills and 'scooting' the bike along the level. Eventually.

*Yes! That was in the distant past when I could still do 1-in-5's!
Pete I have also had to do that and was disappointed on how many vehicles passed me driven by people that must have clearly seen the problem I had.I can guarantee that there is no way I wouldn't spot a cyclist with such a problem even if I was on my motorbike.

Re: Getting home after a puncture

20 January 2015 - 3:16pm
To hijack this thread from the other one, in future you could just dial up an autonomous vehicle to come and pick you up, or deliver a pump. Or one of those Amazon droids.

Re: Getting home after a puncture

20 January 2015 - 3:09pm
gaz wrote:hondated wrote:This might be the opportunity to put forward an idea I have had for some time. And it is couldn't we somehow compile a voluntary directory in our local areas of members who would be willing and able to be contacted for assistance if we encounter an unfortunate breakdown which cannot be fixed at the side of the road.
A national directory used to exist, the CTC Handbook included a list of members willing to assist a fellow member stranded by mechanical failure whilst touring in a different part of the country. It was never intended as a puncture repair service but I trust most would have accepted the catastrophic failure of a pump as a justified reason to be called out.
Thanks gaz I never realised that.

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