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Updated: 1 hour 48 min ago

Re: Boris' backie

28 July 2015 - 11:46am
I believe that it applies to bicycles which are not mechanically propelled; that is most pedal cycles.

Re: Boris' backie

28 July 2015 - 11:37am
"Not more than one person may be carried on a road on a bicycle not propelled by mechanical power unless it is constructed or adapted for the carriage of more than one person."

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1988/52/section/24

Been wondering this since the story broke but the press are just unquestioningly parroting the story so no hope there. The bit I've bolded would suggest this law only applies to electric bikes etc? I know the law can be a little obtuse at times but it's rarely so daft it acually means the opposite of what it is written.

The alternative would mean that this does not apply to electric bikes???

Re: Hi Viz plod gets space

28 July 2015 - 11:17am
ferdinand wrote:I quite like it, though it does look a little distinctive.

It seems to be single sided (may be wrong on that) from the piccie on the website, so do you wear the panel facing forwards or backwards?

(Edit: perhaps that is the zip pocket).

Ferdinand

Yes, the zip pocket is at the front.

Re: Boris' backie

28 July 2015 - 10:56am
What is dangerous is relative and depends upon conditions. I have seen people sharing Boris-bikes on a few occasions, but on observing them doing it while going the wrong way up a busy one-way street, it is the latter that worries me more for the riders' safety. But again, these things are relative. I am, at the moment, routinely using a 10yd stretch of temporary 1-way street (due to construction works) in the wrong direction, as do many other cyclist passing there, as we have tried the alternatives and they are worse. You can just wait until there's nothing coming and it's Not A Problem.

About 12 years ago I saw BoJo cycling up the Strand while talking into a hand-held mobile phone. At the time, the road, in his direction of travel, was entirely full of standing traffic. Such is the narrow width of the lanes on the Strand, it is very challenging to cycle at all on the Strand when it is so full of standing traffic - you usually can't get past a bus in such conditions without leaving the carriageway. Indeed, even though I worked on the Strand, I used to avoid cycling on the Strand if it could at all be avoided - my usual routes avoided it entirely. But to be attempting it while talking on a hand-held mobile was a challenge indeed.

Re: Boris' backie

27 July 2015 - 11:27pm
thirdcrank wrote:If I've read the linked BBC article correctly, the suitability or otherwise of the rack isn't an issue

It shows Ms Wheeler sitting on the saddle, without a helmet, holding her handbag as her husband stands on the pedals.


Have we got to the state now where saddles are expected to wear helmets too?

Re: Boris' backie

27 July 2015 - 10:24pm
If I've read the linked BBC article correctly, the suitability or otherwise of the rack isn't an issue

It shows Ms Wheeler sitting on the saddle, without a helmet, holding her handbag as her husband stands on the pedals.

You couldn't make it up. He's claiming ignorance of the law about cycling while giving a saddle to a barrister called "Wheeler."

It's the silly season.

Re: Pedestrians' view of bells ?

27 July 2015 - 9:53pm
Haven't found a place to put one on my new bike, but for the last 1000k no-one I've met on cycle paths has taken a friendly hello badly.

For the sake of passing the PBP bike check I'll maybe mount one under the saddle.

Re: Boris' backie

27 July 2015 - 9:09pm
I'd have thought the manufacturer's claim of suitability should be good enough. Maybe you should go the whole hog and get a seat http://www.cyclechicrepublic.com/27-bac ... t-cushions

The RTA says "constructed or adapted". I'd say that's adapted

Re: Boris' backie

27 July 2015 - 8:55pm
My Dutch bike's rack is rated to carry the weight of a person as long as they're not too heavy and doing so is mentioned in the maker's advertising ("Perfect for pannier bags, shopping and most importantly: the Dutch way of giving your mates a lift!"). Anyone know if that would count as constructed to carry two people in the sense of the RTA?

London hire bikes are even heavier than my Dutchie, so it seems like they could easily double the system's user capacity if they put a sturdy rear rack on them!

Re: Boris' backie

27 July 2015 - 8:01pm
I really have gone off the BBC. I'm no politician or conservative supporter but I've always liked Boris. He knows how to have fun and I guess so does his wife! Good on him for being so restrained with all those interfering, controlling numpties...b

Re: Boris' backie

27 July 2015 - 7:35pm
P-poor journalism as per usual. Still searching for the "1998 Road and Traffic Act"

But, yeah, I totally agree it's another of those things which is not dangerous https://aseasyasridingabike.wordpress.c ... dangerous/

Boris' backie

27 July 2015 - 7:25pm
Illegal here but is it that heinous a crime? Its very common to see them in the Netherlands but I don't recall an excess of backie induced deaths and injuries

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-33681509

Re: Horses: modern ones selected from what stock?

27 July 2015 - 6:07pm
ferdinand wrote:Prey items especially in France.... And in Tesco's

Re: Pedestrians' view of bells ?

27 July 2015 - 5:45pm
Several posts by David Hembrow on the deficiencies of shared use paths: http://www.aviewfromthecyclepath.com/se ... se%20paths

Re: Horses: modern ones selected from what stock?

27 July 2015 - 5:06pm
rualexander wrote:Horses are prey animals, its in their nature to be spooked by things they're not sure about, not everything can be bred out of animals.

Prey items especially in France, but I didn't see any panic in the TdF . Far more spooking from right-on students when I brought horse-meat back.

We are becoming quite horsey round here -w e even have a bridleway with a canter track, and I meet one or two most days. Generally no problems.

And most impressed seeing them shimmy across Pegasus crossings and the mazes each side.

Ferdinand

Re: Is the entire field of view blocked for an HGV?

27 July 2015 - 4:49pm
Bicycler wrote:I suspect that insufficient skill is rarely the problem. Unfortunately bad habits, inattention and complacency are hard to test for....
On the Today program this morning (Radio 4) they were doing a bit about the health aspects of night work (or not following a "normal" type sleep pattern) and they interviewed somebody who does office cleaning overnight, finishing at 7:00am and then they go and do their day job driving an HGV around the country (and typically they get 3 hours sleep each 24 hours )!!

So I wonder if inattentiveness might on occasions be through just being too tired or mentally drained to be focusing properly on what you (the driver) is doing.

Ian

Re: Horses: modern ones selected from what stock?

27 July 2015 - 4:42pm
SA_SA_SA wrote:In the (distant) past surely working horses shared busy city roads with wheeled things (carriages etc) pedestrians, bicycles etc. So surely these should have been bred to be less 'skittish'/nervous than some current 'pet' horses seen on roads:

so why have 'pet' horses not been bred from less skittish/nervous i.e. more calm stock? Surely it would be better for the horse itself?

NB I always think that horses being towed in horse boxes must be thinking 'I should be towing not towed: this is just wrong pffffft' There are horses on the road that shouldn't be there. I often meet young horses & riders who don't have full control.
Also a horse is a very sensitive creature that picks up on its riders mood very easily.
So if a rider is nervous & skittish more often his/her mount will be also.
But undoubtedly the biggest problem is drivers who pass to close & to fast. If it scares the s**t out of us cyclists imagine what it does to a rider sitting on top of half a tonne of muscle!
& like most live creatures once they have been scared (abused) by one ignorant driver their reaction to all is to be scared of all regardless.

Re: Horses: modern ones selected from what stock?

27 July 2015 - 4:04pm
Paulatic wrote:"was it anything you did which caused it"?
I often come across a couple of highly strung race horses out exercising Slow down, talk to the rider let them know you are there and usually all will be well.


No, most definitely not. I whistle or shout from a long way if approaching from behind and I can see that the horse hears me, but the rider doesn't. The problem is that the horse is more attentive than the rider.

Re: Horses: modern ones selected from what stock?

27 July 2015 - 4:02pm
There are horses for courses.
Very much like choosing a bike i suppose.
Temperament is taken into account whether breeding for racing, jumping, eventing or just a lead rein pony. I'm getting the impression a lot of you can't differentiate between types and suspect you might be calling ponies horses too.
Those you meet out on the road will be there because the rider is fairly confident they are a safe mount to be out on. If you are experiencing trouble on meeting horses/ponies then have a think "was it anything you did which caused it"?
I often come across a couple of highly strung race horses out exercising Slow down, talk to the rider let them know you are there and usually all will be well.

Re: Horses: modern ones selected from what stock?

27 July 2015 - 4:00pm
Around us, I worry more about the rider's behaviour than the horse's. I live on common land and horses can be ridden off road, yet the local riders insist on using the roads. There are a couple who get very agitated and vocal even if I am approaching from ahead. If from behind, I ride slowly in the gutter on other side of the road and still get abused. If they can't control their horse or the horse is too nervous, it shouldn't be on the road.

But most of all, it really winds me up that they don't pay road tax.

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