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Updated: 5 hours 36 min ago

Re: Snarky safety notice anyone?

19 May 2015 - 1:22pm
I think sewer grates are an odd restriction, given that rabbit holes could easily be worse...

Re: Snarky safety notice anyone?

19 May 2015 - 1:04pm
Flinders wrote:On the face of it I wouldn't say that was snarky- in what way do you think it is?

Well I suppose the fact that it is very clearly a three/four-year-olds bike and they are putting out a warning for adults not to ride it, and not perform extreme stunts on it.

When you receive a 'important safety notice' you expect something like 'the fork will catastrophically fail after 1000 miles' or 'the brakes are lethal', not basic common sense advice about use of a child's bike

Re: Would you have said something?

19 May 2015 - 1:02pm
karlt wrote:AlaninWales wrote:Vantage wrote: It was so ridiculous, I could only shake my head in disbelief and laugh
Descending a steep hill and keeping the speed down to 30 as there was a 30 limit at the bottom. Woman driver dropping off her kid, pulls out of the schoolyard on my right, not even looking. No chance to brake, I swerved around and alongside and remained there for the 30 yards to join the T junction, where I asked her why she pulled out on me: "It's your fault you were riding two abreast".


I was cycling alone.

That reminds me of an old favourite joke from childhood - "What's the difference between a duck? One of its legs is both the same."

Or that standing stone(s) in one of Terry Pratchett's books that you can't count, 'however many there is of it'. That's become a family joke in this house.
Can also be applied to some politicians.

Re: Snarky safety notice anyone?

19 May 2015 - 12:59pm
On the face of it I wouldn't say that was snarky- in what way do you think it is?

Snarky safety notice anyone?

19 May 2015 - 12:50pm
Just received by email:

Important safety notice
Issued 19th May 2015

Applies to Cnoc 14 and Cnoc 16 bicycles purchased between March 2006 and 26th August 2014.


According to our records you have purchased an Islabikes Cnoc 14 or Cnoc 16. If the bike is no longer in your possession please pass this notice to the current owner.

We have been made aware of some instances of extreme usage which have resulted in frame failure. Unfortunately, for bikes purchased before 26th August 2014 we did not provide any explicit guidance on normal usage.

We apologise for this oversight and draw your attention to the user instructions for the Cnoc 14 and Cnoc 16:


Weight limit and usage instructions:

The Cnoc 14 and Cnoc 16 have been designed to be ridden by children on smooth paved, grassy or dirt surfaces with moderate gradients. It is not intended for any kind of jumping.

Parental supervision is required at all times. Avoid areas involving motorised vehicles, and obstacles or potential hazards including inclines, kerbs, stairs, sewer grates or areas near drop-offs or pools.

Your Cnoc has been designed for a maximum combined rider and luggage weight limit of:

Cnoc 14: 24kg (approximate rider age range 3 – 5 years)

Cnoc 16: 26kg (approximate rider age range 4 – 6 years)


What to do next:

Whilst the vast majority of riders will have used their bicycle in accordance with the usage instructions above, we recognise there may be a small minority of customers that have exceeded them.

• If your bike has been used in normal circumstances no action is required. We hope your child continues to enjoy their cycling.

• If you suspect that the bike has been used for jumping (i.e. both wheels leaving the ground) there is a potential for frame failure because the bike has not been designed to withstand these stresses. Please cease riding and contact us for further information and advice (see contact details below).

• If you suspect the bike has been ridden outside of the user weight instructions (e.g. an adult or older child for a prolonged distance) please cease riding and contact us for further information and advice (see contact details below).

We appreciate your understanding in this matter and would like to reassure you that the small number of incidents reported have all been due to jumping and usage outside of the above instructions.

Re: Share the space drop your pace

19 May 2015 - 11:00am
Guilty as charged, apart from what I have seen them do, I am indeed completely ignorant of the ways of fisherman. As an occasional user of both the canals and the canal towpaths I simply find their attitude of superiority infuriating. The canals were put there for boating traffic, not for fisherfolk, and they should not forget that

Re: Would you have said something?

19 May 2015 - 9:47am
AlaninWales wrote:Vantage wrote: It was so ridiculous, I could only shake my head in disbelief and laugh
Descending a steep hill and keeping the speed down to 30 as there was a 30 limit at the bottom. Woman driver dropping off her kid, pulls out of the schoolyard on my right, not even looking. No chance to brake, I swerved around and alongside and remained there for the 30 yards to join the T junction, where I asked her why she pulled out on me: "It's your fault you were riding two abreast".


I was cycling alone.

That reminds me of an old favourite joke from childhood - "What's the difference between a duck? One of its legs is both the same."

Re: Share the space drop your pace

18 May 2015 - 10:30pm
ian s wrote: .... runners are pedestrians, they just happen to be going faster than walkers. For example, runners have no more, or less, priority than walkers.
Agreed.
I agree with earlier comments that the biggest restriction on towpath usage is the danglers with rods right across the path, and frequently the canal also. Why if the fishing is better on the other side of the canal they don't go there and use a 2 foot long rod beats me
Which shows a complete ignorance of angling,in the same way some people(usually motorists) show a complete ignorance of cycling.
The idea of the long poles is so they can fish either side of the canal not just one side.
I occasionally come across someone obstructing the towpath with a pole but they are generally accommodating and apologetic,I wait until they've moved it,usually a few seconds,no big deal,a bit like if a driver has to wait behind me when for a few seconds when they can't overtake.
Very occassionally I may get a slow to react or obstructive angler but it's rare,though the same can be said for any class of towpath user,dog walkers can be absolutely stupid and obstructive and occassionally belligerent so and so's as can groups of ramblers,and likewise some cyclists.

The leaflet is silly
I don't think it is silly,other than horses,cyclists are capable of causing the most injury to other towpath users,so it's only reasonable where space is at a premium,that they should give way to other towpath users IMHO.
I seen some absolutely stupid behaviour by cyclists on the towpaths which I use regularly,their favourite trick is zooming past pedestrians from behind with inches to spare,frightening the life out of them .
These goons(usually commuters though not exclusively) are the type that cause the problems for us all,and if I see it happen I make a point of stopping showing concern and sympathising with the offended people as some sort of reparation.
I view this behaviour in exactly the same way I view the effect drivers have on me when they close overtake when I'm cycling on the road.
Boot and other foot,are words that spring immediately mind.

Re: Share the space drop your pace

18 May 2015 - 9:36pm
The leaflet is silly, because for a start, runners are pedestrians, they just happen to be going faster than walkers. For example, runners have no more, or less, priority than walkers. I agree with earlier comments that the biggest restriction on towpath usage is the danglers with rods right across the path, and frequently the canal also. Why if the fishing is better on the other side of the canal they don't go there and use a 2 foot long rod beats me

Re: Question about this video

18 May 2015 - 9:24pm
Tonyf33 wrote:so hang on, it sounds like most of you are blaming the cyclist here..WHAT THE HELL IS THE MATTER WITH YOU!!!
The HGV comes thundering past UNDERTAKING whilst driving over the chevrons with not enough space to get past at a ridiculous speed, basically couldn't be arsed to overtake or made a late decision not come off the off ramp.
The cyclist wants to move over into the inside lane which IF he had actually moved over he'd be dead

For those of you saying he probably shouldn't be there, how do you know what is acceptable in that country, do you say that a cyclist in this country on a d/c shouldn't be there because of fast moving motorvehicles?
I don't think anyone is blaming the cyclists. Maybe suggesting some things that could have been done to avoid the incident, but that's not blame. Frankly, the video is shocking, but we don't know the road, what happened before the incident, or anything else.

Re: Question about this video

18 May 2015 - 9:03pm
I'm not convinced he could have done -the truck would have been a LONG way back - it was not going slowly, and it would have been in a traffic lane that went elsewhere...

But to answer the original question - I think the truck blipped it's horn?

Re: Share the space drop your pace

18 May 2015 - 3:57pm
In Lancaster there is a nice cycle route that goes from east of Caton along the river Lune to Glasson Docks. It is a nice enough ride but gets a bit bad where the main roads cross the river lune in Lancaster. One of the bridges has a steep underpass with barriers. They are hard enough to negotiate with bikes but we had a trailer too. You needed to lift the trailer around them which took 2 people. If I was on my own I would have basically had to go to the road and cross over at road level at a major juntion in the roads where the one way system starts.

Now Lancaster was one of the original 5 cycling demonstration towns which meant it got a shedload of extra spending to improve cycle use. It set up this Millenium cycleway and produces leaflets with on and off road cycle routes all through the area trying to promote cycling including this cycle route. Why on earth they didn't sort those barriers out. I am sure a small budget could have sorted them out. I mean you have the weight of the trailer on the back of the bike and halfway down a steep slope you have to use the full brakes to hold the trailer while negotiating the barriers. Lack of commonsense going on there.

Re: Share the space drop your pace

18 May 2015 - 3:17pm
The rumour I heard about the resurfaced path was that it had been done at the wrong time of year so the surface hasn't applied correctly( I cycled along it in mid-resurface oops, contractors were fine about it ). As with many jobs they can be done correctly with the right people.... but few and far between in reality it seems. A much worse stretch of the number one route is just beside there, out of warkworth at birling, one of the most bomb cratered sections of track I've ever encountered, shameful considering the number of foreign tourists who are used to much better and have to ride it when travelling up the coast... I reported it to the Duke of Northumberlands estates ( the owner ) and received no reply... well what did I expect from one of the wealthiest landowners.

The provision for cycle paths is very dis-joined, on here, off there, through a style, through a chicane, and not great signing. Hence I ride the road 95% of my time and the tourists in the image are doing that too, simply making good progress on a continuous bike path..... namely the road. Its very car oriented in these parts, people driving 1/2mile or less is very common, so quite hard to get them to understand we all have to share the amenities and that roads aren't just for cars. The negative views outlined in the article I encounter often. Yet on the sustrans path I get dog walkers etc not looking very happy that you're on their path even though I'm riding with due care and attention and saying hello as I pass. Share and share alike on road or bike path.

Re: Share the space drop your pace

18 May 2015 - 3:05pm
We just need the same on the roads...

Re: With double give ways who gives way?

18 May 2015 - 2:34pm
SA_SA_SA wrote:mjr wrote:Awww and we so nearly got to two pages before someone posted an out of touch comment about staying on the road. I'm sure that would help because it's not like any motorist ever pulls out of a side road across a give way line and into a bike
No one said it was impossible, just less likely compared to the pictured two way roadside cycle track (which seems fairly self-evident IMO).
Are you sure? Street view makes it look like a pretty nasty fast sweeping exit curve and I suspect any motorist approaching that junction is going to be looking so far down the dual-carriageway that many will look right through and fail to see a bike on the A56 carriageway too, plus such a rider will feel under more pressure not to slow or stop if the motorist looks like they're going to fail to give way.

EDIT: I just searched for collision reports: nine cycle-involved collisions very near that junction http://www.cyclestreets.net/collisions/ ... clists=Yes (all slight, happily) and AIUI 6 motorists primarily to blame, of which 6 cyclists that were on the carriageway. (3 cyclists with primary blame, of which 2 were on the carriageway.) Without knowing proportions of riders on carriageway and cycleway, it's hard to say much other than noting that collisions have happened on the carriageway there too.

In general, that area looks like a bit of an uncoordinated dog's dinner with no real plan for how traffic should flow, but maybe it's a work in progress... I've not ridden that particular bit of Manchester and I think I'm glad
Also, as a philosophical aside, why segregate cyclists off the public road network
Why indeed? I don't think anyone is doing that. The road network is not only the carriageways, but cycleways and footways too, plus the carriageway should remain available for cycling as needed.

Sorry for slight drift but I feel I should dissuade campaigners from invoking such things (and mocking dissenters).
I wasn't mocking, but rolling my eyes despairingly at yet another instance of someone apparently blaming a crash victim for using a marked cycleway instead of the carriageway.

I've addressed the other points on the new topic.

Re: mobile charger for iPhone

18 May 2015 - 1:52pm
you need min 10000mha - that makes 10 amps !!! are you trying to charge it up or weld it?
I used to have a Lithium Ion battery powering my lights and permanently fixed to the bike. I ran a cable through a 5v voltage regulator which then charged my phone and could keep the Satnav app running for over 8 hours.
incidentally, iphones will draw up to 1amp if plugged into the mains but only 500mA if connected to a d.c. supply.

Re: Question about this video

18 May 2015 - 1:38pm
I'm not saying that the truck driver is in the right. I would say if the cyclist had looked behind and checked traffic before moving road position then he could have avoided it. I daresay the rules of the road there means that there is no way a vehicle should be coming from your right. One was though, and going very fast.

i.e. If in the UK you had been out in the centre of the road then want to turn left would you just half heartedly wave your arm and do it? I certainly wouldn't. Look behind to see what's going on, make eye contact if possible, make a signal like you mean it. Shoulder check again and move. Did we see any of that in the video?

Re: Share the space drop your pace

18 May 2015 - 1:37pm
old_windbag wrote:Hi

Just read the posts about motorist-cyclist and pedestrian-cyclist conflict. I've just had a week of arguing the cyclists side of things and trying to get over to drivers( of which I'm one too ) to be more tolerant and relaxed. We don't often see drivers complain about horse riders, often riding 2 abreast at 3-4mph, but they always find an issue with bikes. I like to see pedestrians, bikes and horses on country roads, they're there to be used and shared, all the aforementioned are out enjoying life and making the most of it. The article below was published in our community newspaper, it saddened me that we still haven't got over a predjudice that existed between coach drivers and bikes in the early days of the bicycle. Now that cycling is popular again the contempt seems to have been re-awoken. God help everyone when the tour of britain travels the road in the article.... or should they reroute them onto cycle paths .

http://www.theambler.co.uk/2015/05/06/w ... ycle-path/

That particular path used to be fairly decent, good quality tarmac. Then some genius decided to resurface it in some sort of gravelly surface. They may may as well have just removed it.

Besides along that stretch there are various bits of path etc, some of which are suitable some of which very much are not and you can't tell when you first join them. Those cycle tourists don't want to have to figure that out so stay with the road.

Re: Share the space drop your pace

18 May 2015 - 1:25pm
I practically live on a canal edge with the back of my house just a shared path away from backing onto the canal itself. My neighbour has a garden directly onto it. We use it all the time for walking and cycling. We have a young child who loves to run along it (just over 2 years old) and use his balance bike too. The surface is a mix of tarmac and tightly packed gravel. It is perfect for cycling with wide paths that are easy to share. I have never had conflict no matter what method I use it.

I have a few rules I follow to make it safe and enjoyable for us and others. Cycle slowly - anything faster than 15mph is not safe and can alienate other users. We cycle about 8 or 9mph. Also slow down if you can not see in a distance you can stop in (without frantic application of squealing brakes). Even if that means you are at walking pace. use a bell or if not got one (get one it makes sense) then in a loud and clear voice make your presence known. Be courteous - say hello if other say it to you, even stop and talk. If you get eye contact and acknowledgement of your presence then that is a good time to say hello or other pleasantries as you pass. If you are walking you must be aware of what is around you and keep an ear and eye out for other users approaching at a faster pace. Do step out of the way - it is still your responsibility to be courteous and considerate of others. If your hearing is bad then be prepared to use your sight more and look around behind you.

Basically there are many ways as a walker, jogger and cyclist I can list to make it a better route for all. I look on it as all users have to treat other users with the respect they demand. I do not hold with any user of a byway having a higher or lower duty of care than others. I may be going against the tide here but we have to control out own actions to make it safe for ourselves and others. That is the same no matter what transport method you use. It is why I get irate over signs putting all emphasis on the cyclist taking responsibity for pedestrians or drivers taking responsibility for the safety of motorbikers.

Re: Question about this video

18 May 2015 - 1:06pm
so hang on, it sounds like most of you are blaming the cyclist here..WHAT THE HELL IS THE MATTER WITH YOU!!!
The HGV comes thundering past UNDERTAKING whilst driving over the chevrons with not enough space to get past at a ridiculous speed, basically couldn't be arsed to overtake or made a late decision not come off the off ramp.
The cyclist wants to move over into the inside lane which IF he had actually moved over he'd be dead

For those of you saying he probably shouldn't be there, how do you know what is acceptable in that country, do you say that a cyclist in this country on a d/c shouldn't be there because of fast moving motorvehicles?

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