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Re: Cycle paths - Lesson learned

18 July 2015 - 5:12pm
Mark1978 wrote:Attaching a speed limit isn't helpful IMO. You should be able to stop in the distance you can see to be clear. But also moderate your speed when going past property entrances and parked cars etc

I agree. Being on my bike is one of the few places I can be these days where I feel a vague sense of being free of our nanny state. Erm...well to a degree....

Re: Collision with another bicycle

18 July 2015 - 4:38pm
DZONIS5 wrote:He was riding Carrera Intercity and mine was Carrera Vulcan. I think Home Insurance is not an option for me either unfortunately because I only rent a room and I bet my landlord wouldn't like his insurance going up later on. He did ask me if I agree it was my fault and I said not really because road is not marked and there is no wrong/right side. There were no witnesses except for couple passer by's sometime after collision. No cctv. I'm more worried about that bump rather than the buckled wheel. I did try to avoid collision didn't have enough time. I got a text from him yesterday saying that I didn't replied to his earlier message (which I never got) and he will pursue the matter.

Here's a photo. I was going at yellow path and he was going on blue one, collision happened at red dot.


The yellow route doesn't look the most sensible one to me. Keep left is a general rule even if not the law and also at this point it looks as though you would have had much better visibility if you had done so. That's not to say it's your fault. Blind corners can be hazardous on these sort of paths and need to approached with caution.

Re: Cycle paths - Lesson learned

18 July 2015 - 4:24pm
Attaching a speed limit isn't helpful IMO. You should be able to stop in the distance you can see to be clear. But also moderate your speed when going past property entrances and parked cars etc

Re: Cycle paths - Lesson learned

18 July 2015 - 4:13pm
pwa, yup, of course I was joking. Agree with your comments, just not impressed by attitude towards more vulnerable parties in this particular situation. Whatever mode of transport I use, it always has to be the case of deferring to the most vulnerable in any potential conflict situation (hence the logic of presumed liability)

Re: Cycle paths - Lesson learned

18 July 2015 - 4:13pm
Stradageek wrote:The cycle paths in Northampton are all dual use but useful for avoiding some dangerous roads/junctions.

But bowling along at 20mph risks problems with 'pod'-estrians, 'meander'-tals, dog walkers etc. Ring a bell or shout a warning and you are as likely to get someone turn and get in the way as move out of the way.

Sadly it has taken me this long to realise that the solution is to approach these obstacles as I would like motorists to approach meeting me on a bicycle.

It's a shared use path and I just need to accept that even if I'm in a hurry I have to go slower and be prepared to courteously share the available space. If I want to travel at speed, I need to stick to the roads!

Yes. And it's worth remembering many of those may be motorists as well and may include HGV/tipper drivers etc!
Respect should be given to all users however they are travelling.

I think that Sustrans recommend if you want cycle faster than 18mph you should be on a road. However passing pedestrians/equestrians at that speed is way too fast and even more so if they were unaware of you.

Re: Indicators, the lost art?

18 July 2015 - 3:06pm
bigjim wrote: But who knows, with the current resurgence of cycling, driving standards towards cyclist might improve
Bless. Aren't you nice.
Not typically, but I do find it quite difficult to enunciate with my tongue so firmly wedded to my cheek.

Re: Indicators, the lost art?

18 July 2015 - 2:57pm
But who knows, with the current resurgence of cycling, driving standards towards cyclist might improve
Bless. Aren't you nice.

Re: Cycle paths - Lesson learned

18 July 2015 - 2:29pm
beardy wrote:Pod-estrian, moton, meanderthal and mamil.

They are all good descriptive terms that ring a bell.

I believe I would come under "Sandalista" or "BOF".

I welcome some imaginative use of language rather than try and censor it in an escalation of moral outrage. You could even call it poetry!

Yes, we can be too quick to take offence at loose comments. I would not have chosen the OP's names for people who drift from left to right across a track, making things more tricky for passing cyclists, but I do find that meandering a problem. As the OP recognises, we have to slow down and pass wayward pedestrians safely and, I suggest, with good humour. It's not worth getting stressed over.

Re: Cycle paths - Lesson learned

18 July 2015 - 2:01pm
Pod-estrian, moton, meanderthal and mamil.

They are all good descriptive terms that ring a bell.

I believe I would come under "Sandalista" or "BOF".

I welcome some imaginative use of language rather than try and censor it in an escalation of moral outrage. You could even call it poetry!

Re: Cycle paths - Lesson learned

18 July 2015 - 1:53pm
pwa wrote:661-Pete, I think you have misunderstood what the OP is saying. It is a story of someone learning that 20mph is inappropriate around pedestrians and that you have to take care around other path users. To pick up on a small point, there are tracks where because of long sight lines it can be okay to let speed build up to 20mph, but not with pedestrians around.
Oh, I think I understood well enough. The OP refers to 'bowling along at 20mph' and taking a long while to realise that this doesn't work. I appreciate that they now seem to have got the message. Contrition is fine, but doesn't excuse the earlier behaviour.

And as I said, expressions like 'pod-estrian' and 'meander-thal' aren't exactly going to show this forum in a good light. I believe there was quite a row not so long ago, about use of words like 'moton'.

Re: Indicators, the lost art?

18 July 2015 - 12:40pm
bigjim wrote:I'm getting used to non indicators and don't get too adgitated about them. They are just part of our ever more selfish society. What does bug me is this new thing of actually deciding to indicate as they are turning. What's that all about? Too late mate. No good to me now!
I agree - with the caveat that I remember as a child reading them described as "BOIL"* many many years ago, a phrase that stuck in my mind ever since!

*Brake operated indicator lights

Thinking about it, I suspect, but don't know, that successive generations have railed against the driving standards of the next generation. But who knows, with the current resurgence of cycling, driving standards towards cyclist might improve

Re: Indicators, the lost art?

18 July 2015 - 12:11pm
I'm getting used to non indicators and don't get too adgitated about them. They are just part of our ever more selfish society. What does bug me is this new thing of actually deciding to indicate as they are turning. What's that all about? Too late mate. No good to me now!

Re: Cycle paths - Lesson learned

18 July 2015 - 12:01pm
Phil Fouracre wrote:What comes around, goes around! Let's just treat everyone else like we criticise motorists for treating us!

If only what goes around did come around.

When I drive, I dont drive like that towards other cyclists or pedestrians. Cyclist to pedestrian encounters are much more balanced in the potential to do harm, I think that I am going to come off better than an 85 year old lady, weighing 50Kg, regardless of who is on the bike when we collide.

Re: my altercation

18 July 2015 - 11:58am
Ah! That was your mistake. You ascribed thought to the process. No, no, no, there was none involved have you learnt nothing?
Just out of interest, as we both cycle this area, have you ever cycled around langport? Travelling to and from Fivehead on the main road I have decided that there must be an invisible barrier about half a mile from the edge of town. Within this the knuckle draggers rule; I have been overtaken on complete blind bends, hooted and sworn at, so many times that I think there must be something in the water!

Re: Cycle paths - Lesson learned

18 July 2015 - 11:54am
Phil Fouracre wrote:What comes around, goes around! Let's just treat everyone else like we criticise motorists for treating us!

I'm sure you are joking. I try to pass other users of shared use paths like I would want them to pass me if our roles were reversed. I try to pass other people's children as if they were my own. And when I'm cycling I expect others to make silly mistakes, because I sometimes make silly mistakes too.

On the shared use paths I have experience of, the majority of cyclists are friendly and slow down, often saying "hello" as they pass pedestrians. But there are the other sort too.

Re: Cycle paths - Lesson learned

18 July 2015 - 11:45am
What comes around, goes around! Let's just treat everyone else like we criticise motorists for treating us!

Re: Indicators, the lost art?

18 July 2015 - 11:41am
I think in the case of driver indicating to turn into junction but doesn't it sticks in my mind from my driving lessons. On waiting to pull out I was about to go due to a car indicating as discussed, my driving instructor held the brake on and said "whoa where are you going".. "I'm pulling out its clear, he's turning into junction", so my instructor said "How do you know that he could be pulling up past the junction, you can't assume".... so I guess it sticks in my mind. I'm sure everyone has something instructional from their driving lesson days that they don't forget... I really enjoyed the hour a week of driving a mini.

Similarly a traffic policeman on TV pulled a man for overtaking on those pinky red dividing areas in the middle of the road covered in white diagonal lines.... I don't think it was an offence as such but he explained why it was there and the common cause of accidents. It was good sense in that he said when most people turn left onto a major road they look right see its clear and pull out never thinking to look left for an overtaking car, rightly or wrongly. He said the demarcation was there at the junction to help prevent this by dissuading drivers on the main road from overtaking at that point due to high accident rate previously.

Re: Route from Oxford Road to Media City?

18 July 2015 - 10:53am
As an update.
I've bought another bike
Oxford station has a 'cycle hub' which is basically a secure cage which is the bargain price of a tenner a year. (There's also one at media city which is included in the price).

So I cycle to Warrington as before and leave my bike there, get the train to Oxford Rd, get my new bike out of the cage, cycle out of the station and on to Oxford Street and almost immediately hop down the steps onto the Rochdale canal tow path.
Follow that a short distance to Castlefield, over a footbridge and onto the Bridgewater canal tow path which takes me all the way down to Media City, car free and very pleasant.

Re: Cycle paths - Lesson learned

18 July 2015 - 10:49am
Stradageek wrote:The cycle paths in Northampton are all dual use but useful for avoiding some dangerous roads/junctions.

But bowling along at 20mph risks problems with 'pod'-estrians, 'meander'-tals, dog walkers etc. Ring a bell or shout a warning and you are as likely to get someone turn and get in the way as move out of the way.

Sadly it has taken me this long to realise that the solution is to approach these obstacles as I would like motorists to approach meeting me on a bicycle.

It's a shared use path and I just need to accept that even if I'm in a hurry I have to go slower and be prepared to courteously share the available space. If I want to travel at speed, I need to stick to the roads!

I agree with every word. And a ping bell is useful on those paths. I used to work for a charity that converted former rail lines into shared use "Community Routes", and we saw them as paths for everyone who didn't have a motor (and mobility scooters). On some we were able to include horses. But of course having a variety of user groups does mean taking care. And for pleasant cycling I much prefer country lanes, even if it does mean meeting the occasional car.

661-Pete, I think you have misunderstood what the OP is saying. It is a story of someone learning that 20mph is inappropriate around pedestrians and that you have to take care around other path users. To pick up on a small point, there are tracks where because of long sight lines it can be okay to let speed build up to 20mph, but not with pedestrians around.

Re: Cycle paths - Lesson learned

18 July 2015 - 10:38am
maxcherry wrote:20mph on a shared path is way to much. If you want to go fast take the road, but a shared path is not safe for either party

+1
Even half that speed can be too fast on busy sections,IMO some cyclists have the same attitude that motorists have,that nothing should slow them down,they have right of way and the path should clear instantly at their appearance

On Friday I witnessed an MTB rider whizz past three walkers on a Bridleway at 20+mph from behind missing them by a about 400mm without a word of warning.
All three were shocked and shaken when I got to them.
I stopped and offered an apology for and had a conversation about the complete and utter moron who'd just scared the living daylights out of them.
With that kind of behaviour it's no wonder cyclists get such a bad press,and it's not the first time I've witnessed it either on shared use paths

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