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Updated: 2 hours 11 min ago

Re: Pride comes before a fall

31 July 2015 - 10:07am
Hi,
I think that some miss the fact that a verbal confrontation ends with one individual getting out of car and assaulting another.
Blaming the cyclist because they feel SO vunerable and constantly intimidated by many car drivers is not right I.M.O.

I have had it many times for just raising my arm or not even moving my body apart from my eyes

When it happens to you good luck with any sympathy..........................................

I should be able to get verbal without profanity and getting physical but not expect any in return.

Best bet is to drive on and NEVER get out of your car to confront / assault..................the cyclist just might protect themselves from their violence...................

I do not blame the cyclist who like me dreads the close pass AT SPEED IN NARROW lanes and roads and the driver always retorts "Whats your problem mate".......................drivers defence - "cyclist confronted me"

Report the driver for assault you have the video.

If anyone thinks that the assault is OK then shame on you.

Re: Pride comes before a fall

31 July 2015 - 9:41am
From that video I can't see whether it's a close pass or not.

I did think that the cyclist was a bit of a looney though. You can tell that it's going to get violent. Whilst having a word may have been in order (if it was a close pass), as soon as you can see that the motorist thinks that they're in the right despite being in the wrong, best thing to do is to just cycle away.

Some cyclists need to be more grown up. The red mist can descend sometimes - rise above it. Once the shouting starts then it's just 'another nutter on a bike'. That motorist is now going to go all out for the next cyclist that he sees that he deems isn't cycling properly.

I do think that the cyclist should go to the police with the video - but in my opinion he was looking for trouble by pursuing the motorist and the police may see it that way too.

Re: Proper use of an A Gate

31 July 2015 - 9:39am
Happy to have this merged or moved.

Ferdinand

Re: Is the entire field of view blocked for an HGV?

31 July 2015 - 9:15am

If he did everything right, if this is 'occasionally unavoidable', then trucks like that are simply not safe on public roads. AIUI they require a Banksman in order to manoevre on site due to HASWA regulations. If they are unsafe manoevring under the sole control of the driver (as the Banksman requirement and the responses to this incident of "let's not be hard on the driver" confirm) then there should always be a driver's assistant to ensure that manoevres like this can be made safely in public areas where you cannot expect those around the truck to be trained in the niceties (sic!) of "blind spots".

I have 'blind spots' driving my Skoda estate, some of them I can't see into simply be moving my head (typically when driving into or out of tight junctions); instead I move my body so that I can see into them. You do not need to be relaxed back into the seat the whole time.

Re: Pride comes before a fall

31 July 2015 - 8:41am
IMHO, it wasn't a close pass anyway!

Re: Pride comes before a fall

31 July 2015 - 7:10am
This is why Car drivers should wear Helmets. Lol !

I hope he got prosecuted for his driving and the assault.

Having said that I don't agree with cyclists going around looking for trouble. I don't think this cyclist was but he didn't control himself enough. Then again in that sort of situation where you've been shaved past within cms of your life and facing a raging lunatic it's hard to keep it together.

Pride comes before a fall

31 July 2015 - 6:49am
As the OP didn't highlight a warning, I will:

This video clip is violent and contains several very strong profanities. Are we a family forum?

Sad indictment of the culture on our roads. Both motorist and cyclist should be brought to book.

The motorist's wrongdoings are a given but the cyclist doesn't even really suffer a close pass. If he was having a bad day and that pass caused him to loose the plot and give chase, maybe he should have stayed in bed. What's he doing cycling? Certainly not enjoying himself. In the process of the chase it looks like he nearly has a couple of collisions with pedestrians.

In the heat of one exchange he admits he's out to wind people up. That he did for sure and he's lucky the motorist didn't catch him the second time as he had lost control by then. I don't blame the cyclist for cycling off down the pavement to escape. Lucky he did but lucky he didn't hit anyone walking along. The poor kid perched in the car. I shake my head for him.

In my opinion, just another wannabe cop with a camera, without the skills or training to record a rational case that would help towards any improvement of the road safety problems we have. Maybe it's me but I think these cameras have made things more dangerous on our roads.

There's also something a bit sick about the editing of this movie. Totally unnecessary to show the motorist falling heavily and at speed a second time and IN SLOW MOTION!

Pride comes before a fall

31 July 2015 - 1:37am
Shame the driver didn't have any. The cyclist is perhaps unwise to chase and confront the driver but the end would have been a whole lot different if he didn't. Yes, there were injuries but only minor I'm guessing.

This video clip is violent and contains several very strong profanities.

Re: Proper use of an A Gate

30 July 2015 - 11:21pm
Pete Owens wrote:ferdinand wrote:The only way they will get taken out is if someone takes the time to request the removal of each one or upgrading in line with current standards.

How much does a heavy duty angle grinder cost?
I don't know but apparently the £80 battery power ones are sufficient to cut barriers now, so I'm told

Re: Proper use of an A Gate

30 July 2015 - 10:33pm
Moderators!!! This is a repeat of a previous thread
.

Had your bike nicked in Bristol?

30 July 2015 - 9:34pm
Avon and Somerset Police have recovered a load of stolen bikes, here are pictures of some of them:-

https://www.flickr.com/photos/aspolice/ ... 6395071206

Re: Proper use of an A Gate

30 July 2015 - 9:14pm
ferdinand wrote:The only way they will get taken out is if someone takes the time to request the removal of each one or upgrading in line with current standards.

How much does a heavy duty angle grinder cost?

Re: Is the entire field of view blocked for an HGV?

30 July 2015 - 9:12pm
Noticed the BBC article at the time, but have only just now found this thread and watched the video.
I'm surprised that incidents like this haven't been more common. Some of the changes made to truck mirrors in recent years, with the intention of improving visibility of the space close to the front rear and sides of the vehicle have had a "side effect" in the form of blind spots in direct vision. I had the misfortune to have to drive an Iveco last week (a smaller one as it happens) and it had a massive blind spot behind the nearside windscreen pillar and mirror. It was too far away from me for head movements to allow me to cover the area. I think its worth pointing out that these vehicles are designed to comply with ever tighter EU regulations and their compliance has been established before the vehicles go on the roads. Officially at least, there's no problem with the vehicle...
Having watched the video I'd probably have set about this turn in a very similar fashion.
There's no knowing how long the bus is going to be there - could be quite a while if he's ahead of schedule - so you probably cant get the 2/3rds or so of the main road that you would need to avoid going on the wrong side of the side street, but the side street isn't too narrow, no one is parked right on the corner, it's reasonably open, visibility should be ok. There is a woman with a push chair walking towards the corner - not too close yet - but makes it very important not to mount the kerb, something he manages, but the look into the mirror to verify pedestrian safety probably denied him his only real chance to spot the motor cycle. As he looked forwards again the bike would already have been in the blind spot and their relative motion would probably have kept it there until the impact occurred.
That's the thing with blind spots. You might know there is one, and try to keep a mental map of what is concealed, but if something else gets in there while your attention is elsewhere - you'll never know until its too late.
As for speed - I don't actually think it was a factor in this instance. He could have gone a bit slower I suppose, but he wasn't going particularly fast. Those steering rear axles only operate at manoeuvring speeds.
I imagine the truck insurers will end up with the bills, but I don't think we should be too hard on the driver.
I'm just glad no one was injured.

Re: Proper use of an A Gate

30 July 2015 - 6:41pm
mjr wrote:So what's the old English for the thing blocking a gate then?

A 'bar', I believe.

Re: Horses: modern ones selected from what stock?

30 July 2015 - 5:11pm
When I started driving a horse box it quickly became apparent to me how bad the general standard of driving was. Horses are very quick with feedback if they can't cope with your driving.

Re: Horses: modern ones selected from what stock?

30 July 2015 - 4:55pm
MartinC wrote:Tacascarow wrote:That has little to do with consideration & nearly everything to do with lack of experience.
I've nearly been taken out by caravans, boat trailers, general car trailers, car transporters & horse boxes.
A separate test to tow a trailer over a certain size & weight should be mandatory IMHO.

Yebbut, not bothering to learn how to do it safely is a lack of consideration in itself. Besides some of the conversations I've had indicate that some of them at least don't consider a too close pass as anything that they need to bother about.
I was merely pointing out that horse boxes aren't unique. But you are right not learning how a trailer of any sort behaves is inconsiderate.
In my part of the world caravans & boat trailers are more common than horse boxes & their owners probably don't take them on the road as often as many horse riders.

One advantage horse riders have over cyclists is their sheer presence & the fact many drivers are justly scared to go to close or fast.
More than one driver has been killed because a horse has reared & come down through the windscreen.
I can't remember any incident where a driver has been killed when involved with a cyclist.

Re: Horses: modern ones selected from what stock?

30 July 2015 - 3:46pm
661-Pete wrote:Flinders wrote:I think the risks riders and horses ace are depressingly similar to ours as cyclists, so maybe we need to show solidarity - if bad/thoughtless/agressive drivers could all be persuaded to drive as well as the vast majority, we'd all be better off.
+1

I always try to announce "Bike(s) coming" as I approach a horse. In a firm tone of voice, so that the horse can hear it as well as the rider, but not a shout. Horses react well to human voices, that's one thing they're accustomed to.

That's my preferred option, either when riding or cycling. And thank you for being so considerate!

Re: Horses: modern ones selected from what stock?

30 July 2015 - 3:43pm
Tacascarow wrote:That has little to do with consideration & nearly everything to do with lack of experience.
I've nearly been taken out by caravans, boat trailers, general car trailers, car transporters & horse boxes.
A separate test to tow a trailer over a certain size & weight should be mandatory IMHO.

I agree. My (very old) licence entitles me to drive things that a new driver now quite rightly wouldn't be allowed to without more testing. As I have never driven anything but a car, I'd be unhappy about driving a van or a trailer without finding someone to give me lessons first even if legally I could do so.
It's not so much the weight of the trailer in any case, it's the added length, so I think driving any trailer should require some training. (I know of a rider who was involved in an incident with a trailer - her horse got one of the tarp hooks driven right into a bone. It took some time for it to heal.)

Re: Horses: modern ones selected from what stock?

30 July 2015 - 1:04pm
Tacascarow wrote:That has little to do with consideration & nearly everything to do with lack of experience.
I've nearly been taken out by caravans, boat trailers, general car trailers, car transporters & horse boxes.
A separate test to tow a trailer over a certain size & weight should be mandatory IMHO.

Yebbut, not bothering to learn how to do it safely is a lack of consideration in itself. Besides some of the conversations I've had indicate that some of them at least don't consider a too close pass as anything that they need to bother about.

Re: Horses: modern ones selected from what stock?

30 July 2015 - 1:03pm
Tacascarow wrote:MartinC wrote:Flinders wrote:...........................I think the risks riders and horses ace are depressingly similar to ours as cyclists, so maybe we need to show solidarity......................................

Well, yes, but I've always been puzzled that my experience is that people towing horse boxes seem to show little consideration for cyclists when overtaking. Horse boxes are normally wider than the towing vehicle and the wheels wider than the box but the drivers seem reluctant to allow for this. That has little to do with consideration & nearly everything to do with lack of experience.
I've nearly been taken out by caravans, boat trailers, general car trailers, car transporters & horse boxes.
A separate test to tow a trailer over a certain size & weight should be mandatory IMHO.

I understood that drivers passing their tests now are not entitled to tow a trailer. Isn't a separate qualification already required?

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