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Updated: 55 min 29 sec ago

Re: Side saddle cycling

27 August 2014 - 3:42pm
pyruse wrote:One has to ask. Why? What advantage does this offer?

Sociability. If your cycling companion rides a similar-but-opposite machine you can ride two-abreast facing each other and have a good old chinwag. Much easier than that tedious head-turning needed on conventional machines when trying to converse.
I like the crude but ingenious method of getting the plane of the chain turned from semi-across the bike to align with the wheelbase; long chains can cope with considerable contortions.

Re: Solo night ride

27 August 2014 - 3:36pm
A few years ago, I left home at 4.30am to cycle to Bridestowe to meet up with a chap cycling JOGLE. I met him outside his B+B about 6.30am.

I left in the dark and arrived at Bridestowe just before dawn was breaking. It was the first time in my life that I had ridden in total darkness along pitch dark roads for 20miles. I thought I had good lights, but I reckon my front one wasn't good enough! It's very important to have a very bright one with a good lens because I found that anything over 15mph I couldn't see far enough ahead.

Also, in pitch dark, you can't keep an eye on which gear you are in!
Small point, but it really got to me.
Saying all that, I really enjoyed the ride there. Silent empty roads.

Highly recommended.
I've even considered doing a "nocturnal" LEJOG.

Re: Side saddle cycling

27 August 2014 - 3:28pm
Reminds me of one of the aircraft in "Those Magnificent Men In Their Flying Machines" film where there was one aircraft where the pilot was facing backwards. "The idea came to me one day whilst sitting in the bath" (or similar if I remember correctly. and he ended up flying to Scotland.

Ian

Re: Garmin Edge GPS

27 August 2014 - 3:25pm
Good advice Si.
I use GPX tracks and hardly ever let my Garmin do any navigation by itself.

Create a track on BikeHike.co.uk and transfer it to your unit. That way, you get a pink line to follow, all the route info and distances and elevations, but no turn-by-turn directions. TBH, the constant navigation messages about turns drives me bonkers, and it's not that good either, so the pink line is perfect for me.

Someone once said, "Never trust anything that can think for itself."

Re: Side saddle cycling

27 August 2014 - 3:20pm
I too thought "Why?" and "What for?".
As for riding it End2End, somehow I doubt it.

Saying that, I saw a threewheeler shopping bike the other day. It was wide across the back axle, enough to take my alu box, plus it had gears and a rear hub brake. I must admit I was daydreaming about JOGLE on a trike ...........

Re: Four 4x4's on a forty mile ride

27 August 2014 - 1:16pm
Living in the north east of Scotland we have a lot of 4x4 vehicles. I have not noticed any particular discourtesy shown by them than other vehicles. Unlike other posters, I do not claim this as a fact, only my observation but it seems to me that, generally speaking, drivers are a bit more considerate up here than they reportedly are in Englandshire.

Re: Four 4x4's on a forty mile ride

27 August 2014 - 1:06pm
reohn2 wrote:Flinders wrote:What worries me more about SUVs is their dire pedestrian (and presumably also cyclist) safety ratings. Being flat-fronted, and in some cases very badly designed in other ways for pedestrian safety, you're far more likely to be killed by one than by an ordinary saloon if hit at the same speed. As indeed one of my own family was.

They ought not to be being driven without an additional test, and shouldn't be being used for commuting on ordinary roads.

Or should have 'roo bars fitted with sharp edges to them,I'm puzzled as to how they get though an MOT with such thing bolted to the front.
On the point about additional tests etc,there should be a tax load put on them as unnecessary polluters,along with trailers with a gross weight over a tonne*,or wide vehicles ie; caravans,motorhomes,etc,the law is way too lax IMHO.

*which should also have a form of MOT,and before anyone begins to accuse me of anything,I own and use a caravan and trailer both with over one tonne capacity.
Edit:- it may come as a surprise that a trailer can be used with way out of date tyres so long as there's legal tread on them,such tyres are an incident waiting to happen,no legal checks,no road worthiness ceritficate,nothing,all left to the owners discretion

The bars may just get removed for the MOT and put back afterwards. Or they may be perfectly legal (though they ought not to be).

Re: Solo night ride

27 August 2014 - 12:30pm
Ayesha wrote:Take a spare small front lamp that operates off AA Batteries. Take some hefty rubber bands and a lump of sponge.

Thanks for the advice I wasn't intending to take anything other than the Exposure lights but I have some other button cell ones I will now take. Have used AA battery lights in the past but find they can die for no apparent reason and so need multiple extra batteries and not from the same pack.

Will be taking 2 spare tubes so roadside repair won't be an issue. Good point about the reflectives will see what I can get a hold of.

What's the sponge for?

Re: Four 4x4's on a forty mile ride

27 August 2014 - 12:27pm
NATURAL ANKLING wrote:Hi,
Possible that proportionately suv's / 4x4's are bad drivers, but is their bad driving more worse to show up that musch more on being discourtious / dangerous to cyclist that other models of cars , or as suggested is your own personal experience marring across the board cyclists experiences
We all will at times shoot off if another same model of car or type of car gives us a bad maneuver again.
That's what the thread is all about,to find if others have the same experiences as I do.So far the only real defenders(sorry)of 4x4/suv'S has been their owners,which are also cyclists so they're bound to be biased,perhaps because they're careful drivers around vulnerable road users,which again shouldn't be any surprise.
My point is one of proportion of bad drivers, which as I posted up thread I find higher with 4x4?SUV drivers.If you don't see it that way that OK, we differ in opinion.But there are far more medium sized MPV's and small HB's on the road than 4x4/SUV's and proportionally I don't get the same problems proportionally,that's not to say drivers of those types of vehicles don't give me any problems at all,they do just less so.

Re: Solo night ride

27 August 2014 - 12:21pm
This is the problem with cycling after the pubs close. You might get a full moon.

Re: Solo night ride

27 August 2014 - 12:19pm
661-Pete wrote:What route are you currently proposing to go on?

Anyway I can plot out various routes for you on Google, if you like.

I want to leave at around midnight from the Highgate area of north London and arrive in Brighton at a time when I can get a hot cup of tea and breakfast.

The obvious route would be to draw a line straight down but as you say there are some hills of note involved in that approach and also I'd expect to reach Brighton at a rather unsociable 05:30ish.
Was wondering how feasible a route more westward would be via say Kingston, Woking, Guildford and West Grinstead? Benefit would be that its flatter and gets me to Brighton at about 7am but on the minus side its around 20 miles longer. Have been looking at this option on Google maps but the huge elephant in the room is that its routed me on to gravel/farm tracks and other unsuitable surfaces in the past.

I'd be more than thankful for any route suggestions.

Re: Solo night ride

27 August 2014 - 12:19pm
One slight problem with this weekend is it's only a couple of days after the new moon. It won't affect the cycling, but the countryside can look amazing when lit up by a full moon. In the open I've even been known to turn my light off and just cycle by moonlight (with teh switch to hand should someone be inconsiderate enough to come the other way).

Of course you could wait a couple of weeks and then it'll be overcast anyway

Re: Side saddle cycling

27 August 2014 - 12:16pm
IIRC, they are called a 'Shay'.

Other versions were tandems with a bevel gear to a shaft driven rear.

Re: Four 4x4's on a forty mile ride

27 August 2014 - 12:13pm
Flinders wrote:What worries me more about SUVs is their dire pedestrian (and presumably also cyclist) safety ratings. Being flat-fronted, and in some cases very badly designed in other ways for pedestrian safety, you're far more likely to be killed by one than by an ordinary saloon if hit at the same speed. As indeed one of my own family was.

They ought not to be being driven without an additional test, and shouldn't be being used for commuting on ordinary roads.

Or should have 'roo bars fitted with sharp edges to them,I'm puzzled as to how they get though an MOT with such thing bolted to the front.
On the point about additional tests etc,there should be a tax load put on them as unnecessary polluters,along with trailers with a gross weight over a tonne*,or wide vehicles ie; caravans,motorhomes,etc,the law is way too lax IMHO.

*which should also have a form of MOT,and before anyone begins to accuse me of anything,I own and use a caravan and trailer both with over one tonne capacity.
Edit:- it may come as a surprise that a trailer can be used with way out of date tyres so long as there's legal tread on them,such tyres are an incident waiting to happen,no legal checks,no road worthiness ceritficate,nothing,all left to the owners discretion

Re: Side saddle cycling

27 August 2014 - 12:11pm
Another possible for a MickF End to End. Will it take a trailer?

Re: Four 4x4's on a forty mile ride

27 August 2014 - 10:57am
What worries me more about SUVs is their dire pedestrian (and presumably also cyclist) safety ratings. Being flat-fronted, and in some cases very badly designed in other ways for pedestrian safety, you're far more likely to be killed by one than by an ordinary saloon if hit at the same speed. As indeed one of my own family was.

They ought not to be being driven without an additional test, and shouldn't be being used for commuting on ordinary roads.

Re: Bike Security Locked At Supermarket Bike Rack

27 August 2014 - 10:22am
My Waitrose is terrible for places to lock bikes (hence my original post).

However, encouragingly, a new Morrisons has recently opened just down the road from it which has excellent bike lock facilities. Loads and loads of the bent tubes set in the ground across the front of the store, then a load more "overflow" ones down the side (not as good, but if the store is that busy then there will be plenty of people around. Encouraging that a new built store includes such facilities.

Ian

Re: Solo night ride

27 August 2014 - 10:11am
Take a spare small front lamp that operates off AA Batteries. Take some hefty rubber bands and a lump of sponge.
Not only does the spare lamp come in as a reserve for your main lamp, it can be used to floodlight a puncture repair.
With the rubber bands and sponge, you can fix it on your handlebars or on the side of your helmet.

Fit two rear lamps.
Have them NOT so bright that they dazzle drivers.

If your shoes do not have reflective panels, wear anklebands of amber or yellow. The vertical oscillation of your ankles will allow an approaching motorist to judge your distance and position, because most motorists have a pretty good idea of the crank throw of a bicycle. If your rear lamps are too bright, the motorist might be dazzled and unable to judge the movement of your ankles.

Re: Bike Security Locked At Supermarket Bike Rack

27 August 2014 - 10:10am
I'd never leave a bike locked up anywhere overnight.

Its just crazy, you come back next day and half the parts will be missing!

Re: Bike Security Locked At Supermarket Bike Rack

27 August 2014 - 10:08am
Lakeland Cambridge no longer allow folded folding bikes to be wheeled around the shop. They do have larger shopping trollies which are allowed. Maybe next time I'll put the bike in a trolley. The (council-provided) parking outside that shop is woefully overcrowded.

Around King's Lynn, Sainsburys, Morrisons and the Tesco furthest from any cycleway are OK. Asda, Spar and the other three(?) Tescos have a mix of wheelbenders, racks sited too close to walls and all the usual nonsense. Morrisons did park their advert on a cycleway near a dangerous junction, though. https://twitter.com/mjray/status/407904 ... 00/photo/1

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