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Updated: 1 hour 31 min ago

Re: The Calm Before The Storm

16 November 2014 - 7:07pm
mike_dowler wrote:I am interested in the assertion that motorcyclists have the right to filter. Does this have any basis in eg the HC? I appreciate the argument that it makes a (small) reduction in the length of the queue, but cannot see why it should be necessary. After all motorbikes are perfectly able to keep up with the traffic flow when it is moving; why should they not also wait there turn when the traffic is stopped?
Why should other road users block anyone filtering if it's safe to do so,especially if the vehicle needn't be held up other than the fact that they chose the right mode of transport when others didn't?


The situation is rather different for cyclists since (a) most of us cannot keep up with freely flowing traffic, (b) the HC encourages cats to overtake (or at least assumes that they will), and (c) facilities are usually directed at providing a specific route for filtering. I starting thinking about this in the recent discussion about ASLs, which I am often forced to share with motorbikes.
It's all about safe movement of traffic,if it's safe to filter then what's the problem,whatever the vehicle?
Motorcycles and can filter safely through standing and slow moving traffic,so why should they needlessly wait in a line of traffic
The whole problem in the video in question is the car driver who can't get anywhere but decides to impede the motorcyclist's progress unnecessarily out of nothing other than stupid and deliberate nastiness.
The motorcyclist's response is arguably OTT but there is no need for him to be held up if there's room to filter safely.
I really don't understand attitude of,I'm stopped so everyone else should be too!

Edited to clarify

Re: The Calm Before The Storm

16 November 2014 - 6:59pm
mike_dowler wrote:I am interested in the assertion that motorcyclists have the right to filter.
Any road user has the general right to overtake any other road user. The HC and the inderlying Acts don't normally give rights, but prohibitions.

mike_dowler wrote:... the HC encourages cats to overtake ...
I often have problems with dogs overtaking me then trying to bite my wheels. Never any problem with cats.

Re: The Calm Before The Storm

16 November 2014 - 6:51pm
661-Pete wrote:Bonefishblues wrote:I agree, but would comment that hindsight must surely have had time to take effect before one posts (consistently, having viewed a number of his clips) on a Youtube Channel?
That's my point. I may lapse into bad language, but I'm not proud of the fact...

My point was that we aren't all alike and that some people view a bad deed worse than 'bad' language.
Though I do agree that using bad language in response to a bad deed can be counter productive,sometimes the red mist descends.

Re: The Calm Before The Storm

16 November 2014 - 6:46pm
I am interested in the assertion that motorcyclists have the right to filter. Does this have any basis in eg the HC? I appreciate the argument that it makes a (small) reduction in the length of the queue, but cannot see why it should be necessary. After all motorbikes are perfectly able to keep up with the traffic flow when it is moving; why should they not also wait there turn when the traffic is stopped?

The situation is rather different for cyclists since (a) most of us cannot keep up with freely flowing traffic, (b) the HC encourages cats to overtake (or at least assumes that they will), and (c) facilities are usually directed at providing a specific route for filtering. I starting thinking about this in the recent discussion about ASLs, which I am often forced to share with motorbikes.

Re: 11 degree or 11%?

16 November 2014 - 6:37pm
thirdcrank wrote:OS chevrons don't seem to provide much consistency either: I've noted the number of chevrons on a hill increasing between editions

It's most unkind of you to point that out just when I was taking solace in the thought I was successfully keeping the years at bay

Since I am not driving a heavily-laden lorry on a tight schedule I find the question of grades to be largely academic. In practical terms when I (or we on the tandem) are in the lowest gear and can no longer maintain a speed faster than walking pace (about 3.5 mph for Mrs. M-k and me) it's time to get off and push.

Heading downhill, when my eyes begin to water so heavily from the wind that my vision blurs … then it's time to apply the brakes

Re: The Calm Before The Storm

16 November 2014 - 6:22pm
Bonefishblues wrote:I agree, but would comment that hindsight must surely have had time to take effect before one posts (consistently, having viewed a number of his clips) on a Youtube Channel?
That's my point. I may lapse into bad language, but I'm not proud of the fact...

Re: M324 Pedals - You couldn't make it up

16 November 2014 - 5:41pm
Before you buy 'em, bear in mind that they are a pain to maintain as they need a special tool (which costs about £40 or something) to adjust the bearings, or a great deal of faffing with improvised tools. I have a pair of which the axle in one pedal worked loose within a year - so I changed them for some other pedals which have more accessible lock nuts. You can probably find more details by a search on the forum.........

Re: The Calm Before The Storm

16 November 2014 - 5:40pm
reohn2 wrote:Pete
If my life was on camera I'd be extremely embarrassed by some of my behaviour,and so would the vast majority of other people IMHO.
Anyone who puts their lives on Youtube stands naked for all to see,sometimes they're right sometimes wrong.
In this particular case(the OP video) SeikenBiker is guilty of venting(wrongly IMO) but 20/20 hindsight's an incredible view!
I hope we can all learn something .
I agree, but would comment that hindsight must surely have had time to take effect before one posts (consistently, having viewed a number of his clips) on a Youtube Channel?

Re: The Calm Before The Storm

16 November 2014 - 5:23pm
I occasionally have to deliver new vehicles to London, I sit in traffic with scooters, motorcycle and cyclists passing on either side of the vehicle. Most of the scooters and motorcyclists are passing very close and at speeds which are excessive for the traffic conditions. I am quite convinced that should they impact my vehicle, most likely the wing mirror, they would not stop and I would be unlikely to be able to get their registration details.

This must be a common occurrence.

Re: police ask for help identifying cyclist, Denbigh/Trefnan

16 November 2014 - 2:26pm
Condolences to all her friends and relatives.

Re: Using a toucan to turn right: banned?

16 November 2014 - 1:53pm
I frequently used the crossing as "cover" while turning right as it holds the motors back long enough for me to angle across the road and onto the pavement without entering the crossing before they are released.

Or possibly entering the crossing near to the other side just to use its dropped kerb.

Re: Using a toucan to turn right: banned?

16 November 2014 - 1:04pm
I'm not sure which bit of the thread is being described as daft. The most obvious thing - to me at least - about trying to use a toucan to turn right without first going up onto the pavement is that unless you are Mr Tickle there's no way of pressing the button to stop the traffic.

Re: Using a toucan to turn right: banned?

16 November 2014 - 12:55pm
thirdcrank wrote:.... unless I've misunderstood your post......
You understand my post correctly: so it sounds like I have perhaps misunderstood the direction of the forbidden right turn as you suggest.

thirdcrank wrote:... However, a cyclist on the carriageway may not legally do the reverse of that, ie join a toucan to cross the roadwhile the signals are at a STOP phase, because they would be contravening the STOP requirement. ie When traffic is stopped by the signal, a cyclist can only join a standard toucan from the footway. Around here, they have installed mini sliproads (which they call "jughandles" IIRC) to farcilitate this and, perhaps more to the point, they have installed signs along the lines CYCLISTS USE TOUCAN FOR RIGHT TURN. I presume these are only advisory, but I doubt it would help a compo claim if it were shown that the signs had been ignored.
There are no jughandles on my local toucans but I sometimes similarly turn right off the road to path by turning left,stopping, then crossing toucan crossing.

Re: Using a toucan to turn right: banned?

16 November 2014 - 11:58am
this sounds almost as daft as the rule that says you can only use an advance stop line if you have used the gutterside feeder lane - no logic!

Re: Using a toucan to turn right: banned?

16 November 2014 - 11:56am
Seems a perfectly legitimate use of the toucan to me.

Re: 11 degree or 11%?

16 November 2014 - 10:48am
For some reason, I never noticed this thread till it was linked to another.

In the rather academic analysis of the different ways that the steepness road climbs might be expressed, the practical needs of cyclists seem to have been missed. It seems to me that a cyclist would benefit from two bits of info about a hill: "in no particular order" how bad is the steepest bit? How much height is gained for distance travelled? All I could say with any certainty is that the current hotch-potch of signs, whether expressed in %ages, ratios or even £-s-d., doesn't provide either. Nor is there any obvious consistency, so something signed 1:10 in one area may go unnoticed elsewhere, or be signed 1:7. Furthermore, and as I've posted before, OS chevrons don't seem to provide much consistency either: I've noted the number of chevrons on a hill increasing between editions - which seems to confirm the reports coming up from my legs but not the reality - and one case of the chevrons being reversed on the same hill.

Remember, the son of the squaw on the hippopotamus, is equal to .....

Re: Using a toucan to turn right: banned?

16 November 2014 - 8:58am
SA_SA_SA wrote:I have a vague memory of somewhere stating that using the "green pedal cycle" phase of a toucan to turn right onto the main road itself was somehow forbidden but can find no reference in law?

Am I mistaken?

Perhaps you have misunderstood what you read, unless I've misunderstood your post.

As I see it, there's nothing to stop a cyclist who is crossing a road on a toucan crossing, leaving the crossing and joining the main carriageway before they get to the other side. However, a cyclist on the carriageway may not legally do the reverse of that, ie join a toucan to cross the roadwhile the signals are at a STOP phase, because they would be contravening the STOP requirement. ie When traffic is stopped by the signal, a cyclist can only join a standard toucan from the footway. Around here, they have installed mini sliproads (which they call "jughandles" IIRC) to farcilitate this and, perhaps more to the point, they have installed signs along the lines CYCLISTS USE TOUCAN FOR RIGHT TURN. I presume these are only advisory, but I doubt it would help a compo claim if it were shown that the signs had been ignored.

Re: Using a toucan to turn right: banned?

16 November 2014 - 7:38am
I have often walked my bike across a pelican crossing in order to get to the other side of a busy road in order to then cycle on in that direction.

Re: Using a toucan to turn right: banned?

15 November 2014 - 11:10pm
If you can find no reference in law I'm sure I wouldn't be able to either.

I'd imagine that if an accident (or significant near miss) occurred then it might be prosecuted under RTA 1988 Section 28/29 for dangerous /careless cycling.

Using a toucan to turn right: banned?

15 November 2014 - 10:12pm
I have a vague memory of somewhere stating that using the "green pedal cycle" phase of a toucan to turn right onto the main road itself was somehow forbidden but can find no reference in law?

Am I mistaken?

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