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Updated: 2 hours 17 min ago

Re: Nightmare drive

2 July 2014 - 3:07pm
Mark1978 wrote:It's an extra 20 miles around, again mostly on single track, might be reasonable if the diversion route was of significantly better quality, but then Applecross isn't exactly a major population centre.

http://goo.gl/maps/Ib3Bx it's a pretty amazing road to drive, and not too difficult due it being very open so you can see oncoming traffic a long way off.

I suspect if the road was closed to motor traffic maintenance would drop to zero and we'd get up with a dirt track unridable by road bikes.

So there are two single track routes?

Why not have them both "one way" for motor vehicles?
With big signs saying " oncoming cyclists"

Re: collecting my new bike

2 July 2014 - 2:43pm
easyroller wrote:Flinders wrote:I assume you're joking?

Only half joking actually. The point was he has never ridden a road bike - ever - no idea how to work the brakes or gears, has no cycle maintenance knowledge and has to ride home burdened with a load of accessories either down a 70mph dual carriageway or through a hilly estate with heavy traffic. Probably best put it in the car and then practice somewhere quietly.


Flinders wrote:I've been cycling for over 30 years, commuted every day in Central London for 6 of them, and I've never once had to take wheel off when out. Not once.
Twice I have had to push the bike home- one was an unmendable puncture that wrote of the tyre as well, and the other was a catastrophic derailleur failure that bent the back forks and wrecked the back wheel.

So in 30 years of riding you've never had to replace an inner tube by the roadside?

Not once. Even when I commuted in the Smoke I never got a puncture I couldn't get home on by pumping the tyre up hard once or twice. But I am a lightweight.
I've changed tubes at home, of course, on previous bikes, but with my current HP tyres, I suspect my paws aren't strong enough to get the tyre back on. The OP might have the same problem. I carry the necessary, of course.

I did comment that I thought if the rider had clips on their shoes and wasn't used to them that I thought he should practice on a trainer first. I think that's a necessity. But when it comes to gears, I rode my current bike home with in-brake gears for the fist time with absolutely no problems at all. It's easier than it would be going the other way from in-brake gears to stem levers, I should think.

On the whole, I agree that if it is possible, I'd get the bike home through other means, like a mate's car or van, and play with the bike somewhere safe off the road. But we don;t know how much experience the OP has on other bikes. If the only difference is that they're used to a MTB they may be fine with it. Personally, I'd struggle with a MTB, having only ever had drop bar road bikes!

Re: Nightmare drive

2 July 2014 - 2:18pm
Thanks Pete: "hideous mini": that is just what we need today, make driving less attractive.

Re: 2 LeJog deaths: Death by dangerous driving charge

2 July 2014 - 2:14pm
A year to get to court, but ninth months of that year consumed before the CPS even brought a charge, during which the second offence was committed. Given the guilty pleas, one has to assume that the evidence was pretty conclusive, so it seems unlikely that the CPS was occupied throughout that time in weighing up the pros and cons of a prosecution. Bureaucratic inertia seems the only plausible explanation.

Re: Nightmare drive

2 July 2014 - 1:50pm
brynpoeth wrote:And there is now a car called "mini", the new versions are bigger and bigger, surely the name is wrong. Back then there was a super spacious car called the MAXI with front wheel-drive (pulls you out of trouble instead of pushing you into it). Or the Ro80.
There's only ever been one 'mini' as far as I'm concerned:

I learned to drive in one of those (initially - until I took lessons and switched to a Hillman Avenger) - and have to admit I thought it was hideous. Seats so uncomfortable that a long ride would guarantee you a lifetime of sciatica - starter button on the floor - windows which would barely open - no synchromesh on first gear (I wonder how many of today's motorists know how to double-declutch?) Hideous - but a lovable beast all the same. The modern re-makes are a travesty. They're not 'minis', just look-alikes.

Note: this thread is largely about cars, so not an off-topic digression!

Re: Nightmare drive

2 July 2014 - 1:35pm
I heard the one about vehicles having to reverse up a steep hill (Arthog hill) because the reverse gear is the lowest. Is it true, does anyone from back then know?

I think the old cars were much better than the new ones, I remember cyclng up Bwlch Oerddrws past a Morris Minor that had overheated. The driver could do nothing but wait half an hour and find a stream to top-up the radiator. I was enjoying my tea and sausages in Dolgellau when he got there much later.

And there is now a car called "mini", the new versions are bigger and bigger, surely the name is wrong. Back then there was a super spacious car called the MAXI with front wheel-drive (pulls you out of trouble instead of pushing you into it). Or the Ro80.

No need to develop any new or "better" cars after that.

Re: Nightmare drive

2 July 2014 - 1:00pm
In winter, for bigger vehicles, for those who would end up with £400 bills for clutches ( ) then yes it is a wise choice to go round. For the ordinary residents of Applecross it would mean even greater isolation and a huge blow to the tourist industry on which they depend. Also have we thought about whether it would just make the single-track coast road intolerable for cyclists?

Re: Nightmare drive

2 July 2014 - 12:48pm
Bicycler wrote:I know the pass is no longer the only road to Applecross but all vehicles having to use the coast road instead would involve many of them making a massive detour. Closing the pass to through motor traffic might seem a bit extreme.
I just took a look on Google at the eastern end of the Bealach na Ba road, and there's even a sign suggesting the alternative low-level route to road users! So it must be a viable alternative.

Notice the reference to 'learner drivers'. I reckon it's not the first time one of the motoring organisations has been called out for a burnt-out clutch, on this road!

Re: Nightmare drive

2 July 2014 - 12:34pm
It's an extra 20 miles around, again mostly on single track, might be reasonable if the diversion route was of significantly better quality, but then Applecross isn't exactly a major population centre.

http://goo.gl/maps/Ib3Bx it's a pretty amazing road to drive, and not too difficult due it being very open so you can see oncoming traffic a long way off.

I suspect if the road was closed to motor traffic maintenance would drop to zero and we'd get up with a dirt track unridable by road bikes.

Re: Nightmare drive

2 July 2014 - 12:28pm
Bicycler wrote:I know the pass is no longer the only road to Applecross but all vehicles having to use the coast road instead would involve many of them making a massive detour. Closing the pass to through motor traffic might seem a bit extreme.
It's only a bit extreme in a motor-vehicle-centric culture. It's common in Scandinavia.

Re: Nightmare drive

2 July 2014 - 12:18pm
I know the pass is no longer the only road to Applecross but all vehicles having to use the coast road instead would involve many of them making a massive detour. Closing the pass to through motor traffic might seem a bit extreme.

Re: Nightmare drive

2 July 2014 - 12:13pm
AlaninWales wrote:661-Pete wrote:What about hybrid or electric cars? Never driven one myself, but I thought that engine braking = regenerative braking was the norm here.
Engine braking != regenerative braking.Not! Both apply a retarding force to the vehicle, but the former just converts kinetic energy to heat, the latter will (mostly) convert kinetic energy to a stored form (eg battery potential) for later use. Unfortunately current electric vehicle batteries can not accept the power (energy per unit time) required for heavy retardation (or control on a steep hill) or usefully fast charging.

Re: Appropriate License Plate

2 July 2014 - 11:48am
Mick F wrote:D 81 TCH Landrover is insured.

askmid.com

Ah, that's how
Thanks Mick

Re: Appropriate License Plate

2 July 2014 - 11:45am
661-Pete wrote:I believe the DVLA censor certain letter and digit combinations which might be offensive, they simply refuse to issue them.
But they do make oversights. They don't have a lot of imagination, thus the imaginative can get some rather, er, different ones past them.

Re: Appropriate License Plate

2 July 2014 - 11:35am
D 81 TCH Landrover is insured.

askmid.com

Re: Appropriate License Plate

2 July 2014 - 11:21am
[XAP]Bob wrote:Vantage wrote:I'll leave it to someone else on the roads to report it. I can't be bothered. I thought it was mildly amusing
If you tell me where/when it was spotted then i'll report it. PM is fine (don't need everyone reporting the same image.)

Pm sent Bob.
I've googled this reporting business and couldn't find any info whatsoever.
I do have to wonder, if the plate is in fact modified illegally, how would the relevant authority dig up the owners address from a plate that doesn't actually exist on record?

Re: Appropriate License Plate

2 July 2014 - 10:52am
pstallwood wrote:FU comes from Fuerth in Bavaria which would be the local registration office for where the car owner lives.Ah yes, we must have been in that area at the time, seeing as I recall that most of the cars around there began with those letters (I was only a child then, but old enough to have learnt all the 'best' words in the playground in case anyone's wondering ).

As many people will know, the French changed their system several years ago, replacing the old "nnnn AA nn" or "nnn AAA nn" patterns with the new "AA-nnn-AA" format. The new style seems to offer more possibilities for 'personalised' plates, but French drivers don't appear to go in for those. I've often wondered whether someone will snap up a plate like "PU-741-NS" (work it out!) but honestly, French drivers don't need to label their cars with insults: they drive arrogantly enough as it is! Or maybe les Flics are more diligent in hunting down illegal plates, than their British counterparts...

Re: Appropriate License Plate

2 July 2014 - 10:23am
Having said that, I recall spotting, on a visit to Germany many years ago, a car with the registration mark FÜ, followed by a hyphen, followed by two more letters which I leave to your imagination, followed by a number. How they got away with that one I can't imagine. As I said it was many years ago: in those days fewer Germans were fluent in English than now.[/quote]


FU comes from Fuerth in Bavaria which would be the local registration office for where the car owner lives. There are lots of possibilities for rude English words eg beginning in CO or SH for example but thankfully there doesn't appear to be the possibility to make the c word. We go to Germany fairly regularly on holiday and are sometimes very amused by some of the plates. I expect Germans would find some of our combinations equally strange like P11OTE on a Pilote motorcaravan that a German thought was a try on.

Apparently the registration system is gradually changing so that you may not have to change your car registration when moving to another registration district as has been the case.
I

Re: collecting my new bike

2 July 2014 - 9:57am
Well he was picking it up yesterday and we haven't heard back from him yet................

Re: Appropriate License Plate

2 July 2014 - 9:53am
Vantage wrote:I'll leave it to someone else on the roads to report it. I can't be bothered. I thought it was mildly amusing
If you tell me where/when it was spotted then i'll report it. PM is fine (don't need everyone reporting the same image.)

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