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Updated: 1 hour 42 min ago

Re: Cruelty to bikes

28 July 2014 - 6:26pm
axel_knutt wrote:It had been ridden with a loose cotter pin for so long that the crank would rotate to and fro by about 30 deg.

I've still got a cotter pin that I took off a friend's bike. He'd left it loose for so long that a notch had been worn in it by the axle, to half the thickness of the pin.

Re: Ring, ring?

28 July 2014 - 5:36pm
pyruse wrote:Am I the only one who find shouts of 'on your right' or 'on your left' confusing?

I rarely say this as people, including other cyclists, are guaranteed to move to the opposite side I want . I don't have a bell and normally give a pleasant greeting – responses vary from the friendly to the indifferent. I've only been admonished once, by a jogger who objected to me being there in the first place ( a cycle path) , and translated an innocuous 'good morning' as 'get out of my way'. I have found in town that my voice gets drowned by traffic noise so a bell would be more useful - two even better! On a recent group ride along a greenway, one chap kept whistling loudly at walkers to warn of our approach – not a tuneful whistle, more of an 'oi, you' one – which I found both mortifying and antisocial. I wish I'd told him to shut up .

Re: Ring, ring?

28 July 2014 - 5:14pm
I have two pingers - one on each handlebar, so one is always in reach.
They also have different tones, so if I'm not doing something complicated, I can make a nice ding-dong by pinging left then right.
When I'm walking I much prefer a bell to a shout; a bell is immediately identifiable as a cyclist. A shout could be a runner or someone shouting at their dog or just someone talking loud.
Am I the only one who find shouts of 'on your right' or 'on your left' confusing?
If someone shouts 'on your right' my immediate reaction is always to look to my right, not to move to my left. But maybe that's just me.

Re: Ten Miles a Day

28 July 2014 - 5:04pm
I'd forgotten about this thread, thanks for reviving it!

Currently averaging 12.5 miles/day. Last year I finished on 8.8 miles/day, happy I'm keeping ahead of that.

Re: dog causes accident

28 July 2014 - 4:56pm
I've always felt that shared use paths mean shared responsibility among adults , regardless of the antics of animals and children. I walk my dog on a local path and have a duty of care to keep her out of harms way. On my bike on the same path I expect to slow down or stop for any dog, child, i-pod wearing adult etc. My progress is always hindered but it, at least, minimises the chance of collision. If I'm in a hurry, I'll use a different route. My father once had an altercation with a cyclist when dog-walking and each one blamed the other. Had either of them showed some care, the incident would have been avoided.

Re: Ring, ring?

28 July 2014 - 4:15pm
No idea, I've yet to use it in those circumstances and tbh, I'd rather not.
The one time I have used it against a ped was a dumb mistake on my part, I hit the airzound instead of the bell and the poor chap near jumped out of his skin. I apologised like he was mother Theresa and he laughed it off, luckily.

Re: Ring, ring?

28 July 2014 - 3:52pm
Doesn't sounding an airhorn provoke similar responses?

Re: Ring, ring?

28 July 2014 - 3:51pm
[XAP]Bob wrote:Air Zound


Funnily enough, my AirZound was indeed bought as a result of some eejit wearing earphones and blocking the path who didn't hear the bell and proceeded to call me a not very nice name when his mate alerted him to my presence.

Re: Alarming ride in downpour today – braking advice

28 July 2014 - 2:39pm
Appreciate the comments regarding brake pads and tyres – I remember seeing Kool Stop salmons recommended here before. My rims are Mavic X517. Not sure what pads are already fitted but I can find out.

I normally bomb down here in the dry, taking care when approaching the crossings.
I can see this could have been phrased better and misrepresents my riding style, so to clarify: I fully agree that one should cycle according to conditions and visibility, and take care to do so. I know this road well and keep my speed under control, slowing well in advance of all the crossings. I've mentioned elsewhere in a different thread that motorists often accelerate to overtake me at such points. Aggressive driving is commonplace and outside of approaching crossings, it is necessary to keep up with the traffic and stay in primary. The rear skid happened on another road earlier on, and at slow speed, while I was preparing to stop at a junction. I understand now that there could be a number of causes for this. On the described downhill stretch in heavy rain, I was on the brakes all the way but was still concerned about the rear wheel locking up and throwing me off – hence my request for advice in the original post.

All replies taken on board - thanks again.

Re: Ten Miles a Day

28 July 2014 - 2:24pm
Show off!

I'm managing just a tad under 14 at the moment. Hoping to reach 5,000 for the year .....

Re: Ring, ring?

28 July 2014 - 2:23pm
I have some bikes with bells and others without bells.

The response to my cycling generally depends on the pedestian.

I've been told to use my bell by someone who stepped off the pavement and walked into me whilst I was in a queue of traffic at traffic lights (I'd been stationary for about 10 seconds and was about 1 metre to the left of the centre of the road).
I've been told to slow down by someone who walked into me whilst reading a text and I was stationary.
I've rung my bell at some pigeons on a cycle path, they took no notice and I stopped. A youth got off an adjacent bench and told me if I rung that thing at him again he would "punch my ***** lights out".
I've rung my bell to warn a pedestrian who was reading a text and about to step off the pavement into the road in front of me. The response, "ring-a-*****-ding" and he stepped out anyway.

In any case when approaching a pedestrian on a shared path or on a road I slow down give them as much room as I can and assume that they have not heard either my bell or 'good morning'.

Re: Ten Miles a Day

28 July 2014 - 2:19pm
Starting to struggle to keep the average above 24. Got to 24.29, but its dropped to 24.07

Re: Ring, ring?

28 July 2014 - 2:13pm
Air Zound
Hornit

Most of the time I just whistle and/or talk

Re: Ribble Winter Audax bike

28 July 2014 - 2:10pm
Yes ithe ribble is a good all year round bike. If you want bikes of similar ilke to compare try searching on Audax

Ribble Winter Audax bike

28 July 2014 - 1:34pm
Hi, thinking about buying this bike - would it be fine for summer weekend rides as well as winter training commmuting ?

The other bike I was thinking of is Specialized Roubaix 2014 - but just a summer bike i think. I have a tourer I could use for winter(though reluctant to use as it is heavy).
Be grateful for your advice.

Thank you

Re: Ring, ring?

28 July 2014 - 12:05pm
If you have a pinger then ring it two or three times quickly. Bizarrely this seems to annoy people less. Maybe it is becuase it repeats the pattern of hello or good morning rather than an oi or hey.

I like the dutchish pingpong bells but they are not as well known here as the rotary brrring.

Re: Ring, ring?

28 July 2014 - 12:01pm
freeflow wrote:I find that the most positive reception to voice is if you say good morning etc followed by a short pause then your request. If folks don't respond to the good morning then you know they haven't heard you. If they do hear then they usually turn to look at you and that makes the next request more engaging. This works particularly well for horse riders who generally appreciate the advnaced warning and the opportunity to prepare thier horse for your passing.

Wouldn't work where I am. The roads are clogged with crowds of tourists all chattering amongst themselves or concentrating on each other or the photo they're trying to take while completely blocking the road. A "Good Morning" would not even get heard. A proper bike bell continuously rung gets through after about 5 seconds or so and then you have to wait while they reorganise themselves to not completely block the road or path. But I admit that's not typical of most of the country.

Re: Ring, ring?

28 July 2014 - 11:47am
I find that the most positive reception to voice is if you say good morning etc followed by a short pause then your request. If folks don't respond to the good morning then you know they haven't heard you. If they do hear then they usually turn to look at you and that makes the next request more engaging. This works particularly well for horse riders who generally appreciate the advnaced warning and the opportunity to prepare thier horse for your passing.

Re: dog causes accident

28 July 2014 - 11:46am
Ontherivet77 wrote:Pete Owens wrote:If this was an incident on the road - where a cyclist had stopped for some reason (any reason) and an Audi had plowed into the back of them, then there would be no dispute whatsoever here that the Audi driver was at fault. They should be able to stop in the distance they can see to be clear.

We are talking about a shared use path - a place where pedestrians have priority and where walking dogs as a perfectly acceptable. A dog wandering erratically about a path does not constitute being out of control. "out of control" means jumping up at people nipping cyclists ankles and so on. It is up to cyclists to look where they are going and to be able to stop if necessary (whether that is for a group of pedestrians, a dog or even a cyclist stopping in front of you).
+1

If the dog was in control, then the owner should be prosecuted for telling the dog to run across the cyclists. You can't have it both ways.
Personally, I'd also cut a child more slack for not having judged her stopping distance perfectly for the conditions than I would an adult dog owner for not being in control of their dog. But hey, that's just me.

Re: Cruelty to bikes

28 July 2014 - 11:42am
squeaker wrote:timdownieuk wrote:I had never realised that Contador couldn't ride properly.Quite He was reaching for his pocket and the bike was swept away under him, probably because of a bump or hole in the road.

What amazes me is that even with a broken leg he rode on afterwards far faster than I can do when in prefect health .

Back to the topic, I was asked to look at a bike that wasn't performing as well as it had been when acquired some months earlier, and as I walked towards it, I asked my friend casually when she'd last oiled it (so I would know how messy my job might be) and when she said 'Oil?' I reckoned I'd got the diagnosis right there. As indeed I had. A bit of 3-in1 and it was all hunky dory again.

I can never understand why people don't listen to machinery. Machines, like people, do try to tell you when they need attention. If a machine starts making a grinding, or knocking, or squeaking noise, it's usually worth a check or two.

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