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Re: It me or do SUVs alway drive to close

19 March 2015 - 2:03am
They do

Re: It me or do SUVs alway drive to close

19 March 2015 - 12:37am
Was thinking just that this morning whilst also conversely noting how drivers if the smallest cars (eg Citroen c1s) seem to give you the most space.

Re: It me or do SUVs alway drive to close

19 March 2015 - 12:33am
Flinders wrote:Not always. Often, but not always. Some of them I've found more considerate than car drivers.
But on average, like Audi and BMW drivers, I find that their standard of driving is worse than average.

I agree,like the Nissan Qashqua(sp?) driver yesterday who decided they'd squirt me with washer fluid whilst simultaneously giving me the two fingered salute.
My crime?
Riding a bicycle in their presence,on a clear wide traffic free road.
There are some sad egotistical oinks driving cars,but there's a disproportion amount of them driving 4x4's* IME.

*I maybe right in thinking that a Qashqua isn't a 4x4 but it's firmly in the vehicle type/class.

Re: Cleats and Crashes

19 March 2015 - 12:22am
Look Keo pedals were a complete revelation for me last year. Not only are the 150 gr lighter than equivalent Shimano SPD SL pedals but I'd say the cleats (especially the Grey ones) are about 50% easier to get in/out of and they don't make that whacking great 'clack ' sound when you snap in or out. It's altogether a much more gentle experience. They're so easy to get out of I've never even come close to an off. Never pulled a foot out by mistake either. I think Look (the original clip less pedal inventor) have completely perfected the experience. I'd never go back to Shimano after a year with Look Keo. All that clacking away at the start of a ride! Arghhhh! *

Re: Didn't know cyclists could be fined for speeding!

19 March 2015 - 12:15am
Mistik-ka wrote:thirdcrank wrote:Finally, I'm sure I've posted before that somehow restricting enforcement of pavement cycling only to cases where pedestrians are endangered or inconvenienced is nonsense: the appropriate charges are dangerous, careless or inconsiderate cycling and should be dealt with accordingly.
We don't have a 'smiley', shouting "Here, here!" or "Bravo!", but if we did I would be the first to click on it. (Common sense has become such a rare commodity )
Well fair enough but you'd be taking enforcement out of the hands of the PCSOs again. It would also be swapping a fairly open and shut (ie. was he cycling on the pavement?) offence for the kind of arguable stuff that we complain leads to motorists continually being let off the hook (ie. did he create a danger either of injury to any person or of serious damage to property, and would that have been obvious to a competent and careful cyclist?). I'd really prefer petty nuisance pavement cycling to be easy to reprimand by way of an on the spot fine rather than prohibitively difficult to deal with.

I quite like the idea of leaving much traffic enforcement to councils but it does strike me that a disproportionate clampdown on misbehaving cyclists could be the kind of popular action some councillors would relish

Re: Cleats and Crashes

19 March 2015 - 12:12am
I have found the key is to anticipate, even if that means sometimes unclipping well in advance of a junction, or the top of a steep hill if I'm slowing too much. In a crises, I've always been able to get out of them faster than my old toe-clips (even though I never tightened the straps on mine). The only way I'd be freer is by using flat pedals, which I never have had; I learned to ride a bike in my 20s with toeclips right from the start.
I was very resistant to changing from toeclips, and I didn't like clipless pedals when I borrowed a bike/shoes to try them, I felt horribly trapped. But now I have changed over, I find I have got used to them, and wouldn't go back to clips and straps, I feel much more at one with the bike. As a bonus, it has really helped my bad knee, because they help me keep my feet in the right alignment.

Re: It me or do SUVs alway drive to close

19 March 2015 - 12:02am
Not always. Often, but not always. Some of them I've found more considerate than car drivers.
But on average, like Audi and BMW drivers, I find that their standard of driving is worse than average.

Re: It me or do SUVs alway drive to close

19 March 2015 - 12:01am
My experience is that all of 'em are out to kill me.

Re: Didn't know cyclists could be fined for speeding!

18 March 2015 - 11:35pm
thirdcrank wrote:Finally, I'm sure I've posted before that somehow restricting enforcement of pavement cycling only to cases where pedestrians are endangered or inconvenienced is nonsense: the appropriate charges are dangerous, careless or inconsiderate cycling and should be dealt with accordingly.
We don't have a 'smiley', shouting "Here, here!" or "Bravo!", but if we did I would be the first to click on it. (Common sense has become such a rare commodity )

Re: Cycle Schemes - are they still worth it?

18 March 2015 - 11:32pm
My employer made a point of "giving" the member of staff the bike at the end of the period, which would then be treated as a benefit. Therefore I had to pay tax on the benefit of the residual charge, rather than the actual charge itself. At least I think that's what happened It seemed a reasonably positive gesture and avoided concern over the full residual charge being suddenly allocated.

When I took advantage of this scheme I just saw it as getting a slightly discounted bike (through the ins and outs of the tax benefit), and basically a free loan. It was also much easier suggesting to Mrs T that I was getting another bike, at around £30-£40 a month straight out of salary rather than spending several hundred out of our precious main budgets....

Re: Cycle Schemes - are they still worth it?

18 March 2015 - 11:12pm
The Cycle to Work scheme has never been worth it from the encouraging cycling perspective.

All it has really done is make buying good quality bikes easier for the typical affluent middle class cycling enthusiasts who would have bought them anyway.

To broaden the appeal of cycling it would probably be better to have a free entry raffle for prizes of bikes restricted to people from less affluent postcodes.

Re: It me or do SUVs alway drive to close

18 March 2015 - 9:58pm
I tend to agree. Why not try a lollipop ?

Re: It me or do SUVs alway drive to close

18 March 2015 - 9:51pm
My experience is that the lower the mpg the higher the less consideration given to cyclists. Main exception being "the school run".

So SUV's come quite bad when it comes to close passes and lack of consideration.

Ian

Re: It me or do SUVs alway drive to close

18 March 2015 - 9:16pm
My experience is that many 4x4s overtake too close but also that quite a few hang back when there is plenty of clear overtaking space. Both probably due to an inability to accurately judge the width of their monster vehicles.

Re: Cycle Schemes - are they still worth it?

18 March 2015 - 9:12pm
Whenever government get involved it seems to always increase the price.

Re: New bike rides blog

18 March 2015 - 9:07pm
Thanks, Paul, that looks very interesting. Will need time to look more closely, but fascinated to find that it includes many of the roads and places I ride frequently, including some less than a mile from home.

Perhaps mjr could offer to contribute something on East Anglia?

Re: It me or do SUVs alway drive to close

18 March 2015 - 9:04pm
Risk compensation?

There was also research out this week that the more expensive the car the less considerate the driver (well duh).

It me or do SUVs alway drive to close

18 March 2015 - 8:48pm
It me or do SUVs always seem to drive to close. More then half of the cars that do so are 4x4.
I don't seem to have the same problem with minivans, which is strange I consider them more
or less the same type of car.

Re: Cleats and Crashes

18 March 2015 - 8:06pm
Tacascarow wrote:foxyrider wrote:Unfortunately i've had experience of coming off the bike with both step in pedals and toe clips. As others have mentioned with step in pedals i've never consciously taken my foot out in such circumstances but have been released safely whilst in flight - unlike with tc's where i was once dragged a considerable distance along an icy road resulting in nasty friction burns all down my side.

Step in pedals - possibly the biggest advance in safety since the invention of the wheel!
I very much doubt that a bike weighing around 10kg is likely to drag a human weighing 60 or 70kg very far at all, regardless of what foot attachment device he/she uses.
Physics doesn't work that way.

Try adding in 20mph, a corner, some downhill and sheet black ice - I can assure you it does work that way! It isn't the bike dragging, its momentum doing its stuff. I never measured the distance exactly but we are talking about 20-25m.

Re: New bike rides blog

18 March 2015 - 7:42pm
There's not even a section for East Anglia

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