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Re: No longer fashionable to say Hello?

6 August 2015 - 2:57pm
Funnily I was thinking exactly the opposite. I don't usually say hello on my usual commute apart from a nod to the 'regulars', but then that's into the centre of Cambridge and (particularly during term time) I'd get a sore throat if I acknowledged everyone.
I cycled down to Abingdon last weekend and with only two exceptions I exchanged greetings with every cyclist I saw (including each one of a train of 7 that passed me)

Re: No longer fashionable to say Hello?

6 August 2015 - 2:34pm
Mrs M_W and I were in Normandy for 3 weeks in July and we exchanged greetings with almost all fellow cyclists. Sitting down eating lunch in town next to our bikes, fellow cyclists and locals invariably took the time to say 'bon appetit' or bonjour. I fund that not everyone says hello back home but maybe English folk are a more reticent lot?

Re: Parked cars blocking shared use path

6 August 2015 - 2:21pm
Near here there's a compulsory cycle path, separated off from the road, that always has a car parked in it. I've passed it a dozen times. Once a couple of blokes even had it up on axle trees and were doing funny car-ish things under it.

I guess the police don't give a rat's ass - but will still penalize any cyclist who gets hit by a car while riding on the road.

Re: Doored cyclist almost run over - good driving?

6 August 2015 - 1:51pm
AlaninWales wrote:............Excellent example!................

No it isn't. A better analogy is: before you had a chainsaw did you buy a manual and train yourself so that you were protected from other people using them (and all the other things that others may injure you with)?

Also, the cyclist is conforming to the Highway Code but not to the other secret code us experienced cyclists have learnt. Going back to the chainsaw example is there another, hidden manual that you familiarised yourself with before using it?

Re: No longer fashionable to say Hello?

6 August 2015 - 1:50pm
Your making the mistake of thinking a bike ride is the same as social media

Re: No longer fashionable to say Hello?

6 August 2015 - 1:45pm
Most people respond to a friendly greeting, however Strada Geek flourescent clad roadies are often an exception IME. They dont like being overtaken either

Al

Re: No longer fashionable to say Hello?

6 August 2015 - 1:38pm
I used to live in the centre of Cheltenham, I used to say hello to my neighbours and people I know but not to everyone in town. I now live in a small village in the country and we all say hello to each other whether we know each other or not.

There was a time when most cyclist would greet each other but now there are many more cycling and I can understand why some don't bother. I normally do but it doesn't bother me if others don't. We used to be a small, insular tribe and everyone had much in common. Now we're just one of many people on bikes - probably a good thing. Nostalgia's fun but you can't run the world on it.

Re: Doored cyclist almost run over - good driving?

6 August 2015 - 1:29pm
irc wrote:AlaninWales wrote:I strongly disagree, this is going down the 'compulsory training' route, you may as well say that adults have no right to ride on the road until they have received and passed Bikeability 3.

I don't need a licence for a chainsaw either but if I bought one I would make sure I educated myself in the safe way of using it. I don't see what is controversial about pointing out that dooring accidents are avoidable and a prudent cyclist wouldn't have had that accident.
Excellent example!

When I bought my first chainsaw, I familiarized myself with the handbook and the safety instructions therein. That should be sufficient to keep me safe whilst using the chainsaw. I hope my neighbours who use them do the same.

When I first started cycling on the roads I familiarised myself with the safety handbook (Highway Code); it is quite possible this cyclist did so too. We all (on this forum) know what the HC says about using cycle facilities don't we!

As it happens, I have a mate who is a professional chainsaw safety instructor who gave me a few extra tips which are definitely not in the product handbook. We all have access on this forum to people who provide training in Bikeability. I learned to ride in (what turned out to be) Primary etc. without having heard of Cyclecraft. As above, it's a coping mechanism and not how we should (need to) be cycling. Neither of these are readily available to your average cyclist, lights and helmets ( ) are. IMO a normal, prudent cyclist may well not be aware that the safety handbook and the (professionally designed) facilities are simply wrong. A "competent and careful" driver OTOH should be abiding by the law which that handbook makes clear to him.

Re: No longer fashionable to say Hello?

6 August 2015 - 1:07pm
Similar here - no response from many others I have passed in the past few weeks

Re: No longer fashionable to say Hello?

6 August 2015 - 1:05pm
Mark1978 wrote:Which bit of the C2C route through NE England? As I cycle that fairly regularly!

Hi Mark,

I live in Fatfield, Washington. The missus and myself are Sustrans rangers looking after our local stretch.

Our local group rides every (or almost every) 1st and 3rd Wednesday of the month, starting from St Bobs crossing Fatfield at 10 am. Rides vary depending upon who turns up, we cater for all abilities, so it could be a short and sluggish trundle, or a faster more demanding outing. Yesterday's ride involved climbing Peth bank out of Lanchester, so a tad more onerous than normal.

Re: No longer fashionable to say Hello?

6 August 2015 - 1:01pm
It's certainly a fashionable subject, seems to come up more often than most
viewtopic.php?f=7&t=86381&hilit=cyclist+greeting
viewtopic.php?f=7&t=92839&hilit=greeting

Re: No longer fashionable to say Hello?

6 August 2015 - 12:44pm
Which bit of the C2C route through NE England? As I cycle that fairly regularly!

No longer fashionable to say Hello?

6 August 2015 - 12:41pm
I've cycled around much of Britain and had a few trips across Europe, and, very largely, on cycle paths, passing cyclists will greet one another with a friendly acknowledgement.

However last week we were riding the trails in Derbyshire and it seemed that it was the exception for cyclists to respond to or initiate a greeting. This unfriendliness doesn't appear to have spread to my neck of the woods (C2C route through NE England), maybe I encountered a rogue sample of riders in Derbyshire?

Is it becoming uncool to greet fellow travellers these days, if so that's a shame!

Re: Doored cyclist almost run over - good driving?

6 August 2015 - 11:18am
bovlomov wrote:reohn2 wrote:... but many's the time both whilst driving an cycling I think the vehicle with the hazard lights flashing is indicating to move off because it's nearside indicator is obscured by the vehicle parked behind it,which gives a false impression.
It's a fundamental problem with hazard lights, and I'm surprised it hasn't been tackled by the motor manufacturers. There is simply no way of knowing which of the two functions an indicator is performing. You'd think it wouldn't be beyond them to devise a different pattern (long on/short off, or irregular?) for the hazard mode.

It's not rocket science is it

Re: Doored cyclist almost run over - good driving?

6 August 2015 - 11:12am
661-Pete wrote: Teaching cyclists to 'avoid the door zone' is effectively a workaround for someone else's problem....

We teach children how to cross the road safely. Working round someone's problem or common sense?

Re: Doored cyclist almost run over - good driving?

6 August 2015 - 11:09am
AlaninWales wrote:I strongly disagree, this is going down the 'compulsory training' route, you may as well say that adults have no right to ride on the road until they have received and passed Bikeability 3.

I don't need a licence for a chainsaw either but if I bought one I would make sure I educated myself in the safe way of using it. I don't see what is controversial about pointing out that dooring accidents are avoidable and a prudent cyclist wouldn't have had that accident.

Re: Doored cyclist almost run over - good driving?

6 August 2015 - 11:07am
reohn2 wrote:... but many's the time both whilst driving an cycling I think the vehicle with the hazard lights flashing is indicating to move off because it's nearside indicator is obscured by the vehicle parked behind it,which gives a false impression.
It's a fundamental problem with hazard lights, and I'm surprised it hasn't been tackled by the motor manufacturers. There is simply no way of knowing which of the two functions an indicator is performing. You'd think it wouldn't be beyond them to devise a different pattern (long on/short off, or irregular?) for the hazard mode.

Re: Doored cyclist almost run over - good driving?

6 August 2015 - 10:43am
661-Pete wrote:The simple fact of the matter is this: it must be the responsibility of the car occupant - be it driver or passenger - to check before opening a door. And there should be severe penalties for offenders. As for children - well I think it should be an offence to allow a child to be in a vehicle - even when stationary - without the childproof locks activated. Teaching cyclists to 'avoid the door zone' is effectively a workaround for someone else's problem.

+1
Having said that, yes I do avoid the door zone - like the majority of cyclists - if I can't see into the vehicle to be certain it's unoccupied.
FWIW,I always avoid the door zone whether cars are occupied or not,and I've been honked at for doing so,but it won't change my riding.The door zone is the door zone,and I ride clear of it,I'm of the opinion that if every cyclist did then motorists would get used to it,and accept it.


As to technical solutions to the problem - or at least to reduce the risk - how about this for an idea which just occurred to me? When someone tries to open a car door from the inside, it won't open at first, instead the hazards start flashing. Only after they've been flashing for five seconds, will the door open. That way the cyclist gets some warning - and so does the motorist. Modern cars have so much electronics packed in them, I'm sure this could be contrived for future designs...
Which in itself sounds like a good idea but many's the time both whilst driving an cycling I think the vehicle with the hazard lights flashing is indicating to move off because it's nearside indicator is obscured by the vehicle parked behind it,which gives a false impression.
We have a situation in many towns and cities where the cycle lane design is a potential death trap for cyclists,that is the problem in all this and as myself and others have stated,it's a scandal,because the most vulernable are being put in danger for the sake of those safely belted up in motors who'll never been in danger at those speeds,and where their journey times will be hastened by a matter seconds due to other's lives and limbs being put at risk.
It's simply another form of 'might is right'
The bottom line is that motorists journey times are more important than vulnerable road users lives.

FWIW,the cyclist in the video will have a bent bike and some scrapes and bruises,and he'll get over it,but I bet he doesn't ride the done zone again.
However OTOH,one of the vets group I ride with had his life ruined due to the very same thing,he was a high mileage cyclist even in his late sixties riding upward of 150miles three or four times a week.He hit the opening door edge on with his left knee.
After numerous operations still only has very limited movement in it,and can no longer ride,or a whole lot of other things too,including driving a manual car.
To make matters worse the driver claimed it was his fault for riding too close to her car,there was a protracted legal battle which he won.But in his own words his life was ruined in an instant,and he's very bitter about the whole thing.
I certainly wouldn't have the courage to tell him shouldn't have been riding in the door zone.

Over the years I've on numerous occasions had car doors flung open in front of me when riding,and if I'd been in the door zone would've either been bought down or possibly,as a natural response,swerved to avoid the door only to be possibly hit by an overtaking car,which all to frequently overtake too close anyway.

Re: Doored cyclist almost run over - good driving?

6 August 2015 - 10:02am
Mistakes will happen, but the infrastructure doesn't allow for mistakes. That is the problem. As has been said we can't expect cyclists to know that they shouldn't use the infrastructure that has been designed as it is unsafe for them. In fact, that very notion is absurd and would almost never happen with anything else.


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