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Re: When its OK to drop a cycling buddy

25 August 2014 - 9:41am
On things like audaxes I'm happy enough to leave people for the carrion to pick over their festering corpses, as long as there wasn't an agreement that I was to be looking after them. I say this due to having been on the other end a few times: I've been riding with people when I've hit the wall and told them to go on without me to which they have refused......this has led to me feeling guilty because of slowing them down, to them having to do the ride at a speed that they wouldn't have chosen too, and to me making my situation worse by trying to go faster than I was able to just to reduce the amount by which I slowed them. Thus, although I've appreciated the generosity and kindness of their actions it has led to all concerned suffering more than they needed to.

Re: Bwlch y Groes

25 August 2014 - 9:33am
When I did it I had to pedal down half the north side because of the head winds

But the climb up from the south was fun - even got on someone's wedding photos that were being done in the hamlet at the bottom as we passed through

Re: When its OK to drop a cycling buddy

25 August 2014 - 9:10am
Audax67 wrote:Only time I've done it was on PBP 2007 when my partner decided to give up in Brest.

There are two sides to it, though: I rode one particular 400 with folk quite a bit younger and stronger than me. Being good friends they said "we'll keep the speed down" but they couldn't: I probably couldn't have either if the situation had been reversed. So I ended up riding a notch or two over my capacity until breaking-point, when at last they accepted what I'd been telling them all along, i.e. I'd be better alone. Seeing them disappear into the darkness was an immense relief. I finished within the time by around 15 minutes, nursing cramp and tendinitis the whole way.
As a slow Audax rider I am sometimes overtaken by another rider who for the best of social reasons decides to ride "with" me. This usually involves me having to make a gradual acceleration so that we are riding at his/her chosen speed. As I don't find this comfortable I try to lag behind saying things like" Don't wait for me - I'll only hold you up", most eventually ride away - but some are insistent on staying with me - albeit halfwheeling me. I don't know of a polite way of dealing with this.
I rarely ride an Audax with a companion - if I do it has to be someone as slow as myself - also most of us go through strong and weak periods during a long ride so this has to be accepted. On these occasions one accepts that if the other rider has a problem that comes before completing the Audax.
On the rare occasions that I catch another rider I ride past and just check that they are o.k.
I'm always willing to stop and help with a puncture or mechanical though.
On club runs I always wait for anyone having difficulty keeping up. This is as it should be - but sometimes I find some in the group don't have much concern for stragglers.

Re: Four 4x4's on a forty mile ride

25 August 2014 - 9:10am
james01 wrote:lisap wrote:I live in a very hilly place, my 4x4 is covered in mud from being on the farm every day AND when it snows I wouldn't get off my property without it.



You could try walking . I'm being slightly facetious but the description of a farm or village being cut off is now used in the press simply when motor vehicles can't get through. It used to mean when people on foot couldn't get through - now that's what I call being really cut off .

I agree that being cut off and not getting out are very different and yes I could walk the 8 mile round trip to the farm but I chose to use a vehicle which is designed for the terrain and conditions. It's warmer and doesn't take as long

Re: Fell off on a sort of tramline - advice please?

25 August 2014 - 8:47am
"The point is that no matter who reports defects and no matter how bad they are, the response of the highway authority may still leave a lot to be desired (to put it politely.)"

In your opinion, apparently not of judges, who are the ones who count

Re: Shock finding: cycling causes weight loss

25 August 2014 - 8:40am
al_yrpal wrote:If I wasnt dieting I wouldnt be counting anything. After 8 months you are well aware of whats what. I havent actually counted anything for weeks until today. Dont like the sound of your diet Garry, you are welcome to it. Thought you all lived on spuds?

Al

Grooving tonite… War on Drugs, Imagine Dragons and Alcest

We used to. I'm not a huge fan of spuds apart from grilled salmon with new potatoes and garden peas. A king fit for a dish..

Re: When its OK to drop a cycling buddy

25 August 2014 - 8:10am
Only time I've done it was on PBP 2007 when my partner decided to give up in Brest.

There are two sides to it, though: I rode one particular 400 with folk quite a bit younger and stronger than me. Being good friends they said "we'll keep the speed down" but they couldn't: I probably couldn't have either if the situation had been reversed. So I ended up riding a notch or two over my capacity until breaking-point, when at last they accepted what I'd been telling them all along, i.e. I'd be better alone. Seeing them disappear into the darkness was an immense relief. I finished within the time by around 15 minutes, nursing cramp and tendinitis the whole way.

Re: When its OK to drop a cycling buddy

25 August 2014 - 6:12am
I would be reluctant to leave a friend behind, even if s/he told me that it was okay. I would assume that if s/he said I should just go & not worry about him/her that it was said only for my sake.

I wouldn't feel right leaving a friend behind, even if it meant riding in the dark without lights.

Re: You Are A Bunch of Frauds

25 August 2014 - 2:52am
661-Pete wrote:Bicycler wrote:I'm currently riding the Schwalbe Marathon Racer tyres which again are a fast touring tyre but a bit heavier with more puncture protection. Either should be much nicer to ride than the M+ and a fair bit easier to fit and remove.I've not come across "Marathon Racer" but I have tried Durano+ which is the road-bike counterpart of the M+, comes in 700x23c. I have to say I was a bit disappointed with those, so I went back to my preferred option which is Specialized Armadillo. But, I suppose, each to his own...
The "Racer" is very poorly named as it is more of a slick road touring tyre and only available in bigger widths. It's not armour plated like the M+, so is a much more supple ride. It's not a tyre for a full on road bike. I agree with R2 that the combination of stiff Dawes Galaxy frame and 25mm Martahon Pluses (presumably at high pressure stretched over wide touring rims) is probably not a good one. Anyway, now the OP has a lightweight road bike he can afford to have a different setup on his Galaxy.

BTW, I agree that the armadillo is a good road tyre, though I preferred gatorskins back when I used narrow tyres.

Re: When its OK to drop a cycling buddy

24 August 2014 - 11:42pm
LollyKat wrote:gaz wrote:Ide Hill trophy.
???

More years ago than I care to remember a bunch of us were taking part in a TRT, 100 miles in 9 hours IIRC. Ide Hill was the last major climb, time was pressing and a few of the group were flagging.

One of our number decided he wanted to be sure of completing the event within the time limit and surged on ahead.

This was considered a dastardly deed so a plan was hatched to teach the dastard a lesson.

A small cycling trophy was purchased at a boot fair and a new plate attached "Ide Hill". At lunch on a subsequent club run it was secreted amongst a number of other sporting trophies that the pub had on display. We perused these innocently and upon spotting the cycling trophy began to speculate with the dastard about what it could have been awarded for and why it was the only cycling trophy in the pub.

After lunch the trophy was spirited away discretely until we reached tea.

By means unknown a passing friar of the Carmelite order was persuaded to present this to the dastard, who by this time didn't really have much clue as to what was happening or why and assumed he was being given stolen goods.

Ide Hill Trophy.jpeg

Whilst he accepted it from the friar he was extremely reluctant to take it home until the true purpose of the trophy and our frame up were explained.

Everafter the "Ide Hill Trophy" was awarded annually at the Christmas dinner to the rider who had shown the greatest lack of esprit de corps over the preceding year by abandoning his friends in their hour of need. The original trophy stayed with it's first owner and was replaced with a shield for future years, there weren't that many contendors.

Re: When its OK to drop a cycling buddy

24 August 2014 - 11:13pm
I'd suggest that when it's suggested by that buddy is a reasonable line - but in various places wouldn't do it then.

Even non buddies can get this treatment - doing the WWC today a bunch of us ended up cycling as a group, and we didn't let people really drop (OK, different people were faster ascending/descending - so we kept splitting and regrouping)

Re: Shock finding: cycling causes weight loss

24 August 2014 - 11:11pm
If I wasnt dieting I wouldnt be counting anything. After 8 months you are well aware of whats what. I havent actually counted anything for weeks until today. Dont like the sound of your diet Garry, you are welcome to it. Thought you all lived on spuds?

Al

Grooving tonite… War on Drugs, Imagine Dragons and Alcest

Re: When its OK to drop a cycling buddy

24 August 2014 - 11:09pm
gaz wrote:Ide Hill trophy.
???

Bwlch y Groes

24 August 2014 - 11:08pm
Crikey - that's a hill and a half! (from the south)

GREAT fun going down the north side though...


(97 miles today, can't bring myself to go out for another 3 ;()

Re: Four 4x4's on a forty mile ride

24 August 2014 - 11:01pm
To make it clear I mean some ladies, and I agree about many young women, they seem scared to be over the wrong side and will often cut in sharply causing you to brake hard. Most ladies are very careful and courteous. Two months ago I got ditched by a blond in a 4wd. First time I have ever had such a problem. Drove off before I got her number.

Al

Re: Four 4x4's on a forty mile ride

24 August 2014 - 10:42pm
Or couldn't you use the horse? "Jingle bells, jingle bells...."

Re: Four 4x4's on a forty mile ride

24 August 2014 - 10:24pm
lisap wrote:I live in a very hilly place, my 4x4 is covered in mud from being on the farm every day AND when it snows I wouldn't get off my property without it.



You could try walking . I'm being slightly facetious but the description of a farm or village being cut off is now used in the press simply when motor vehicles can't get through. It used to mean when people on foot couldn't get through - now that's what I call being really cut off .

Re: Four 4x4's on a forty mile ride

24 August 2014 - 10:14pm
al_yrpal wrote:The worst drivers are undoubtably the ladies.
I was afraid to state the same but now someone else has...........
For some years I though the worst offenders for close overtakes were young ladies, often in small cars. I wondered why that should be the case. I sort of came to the conclusion that they were the group most likely never to have ridden a bike and hence treated it more as an inanimate object.
The reason why this was the case? I thought that because young women have become sadly more vunerable in society in general they were(sort of) understandably less likely to go out on a bike.
I do feel that with something of a renaissance of cycling in the last 5 years or so (more cyclists about generally) this is less the case than formally and perhaps as a group they are not so likely to put fear into me anymore.
Just IMHO

Re: Four 4x4's on a forty mile ride

24 August 2014 - 9:40pm
In the years I have been cycling, I think it is down to pot luck who is on the road when you are out on bike, a few weeks back me and missus had a Land Rover towing a Land Rover overtake us coming up to bend causing the car in the opposite direction kick up dust by pulling into and braking hard into the bank.

Only last week I shot off from missus to get home to have a cuppa ready for her, i had a car overtake me between two bends only to indicate at last minute to turn right followed by another car who thought the car in front was going to keep going, the driver braked and was in middle of road.

As for pecking order on road I think it is true with some people in there minds, its the same as most things some people think and care and some think and don't care.

Re: Shock finding: cycling causes weight loss

24 August 2014 - 9:19pm
Gearoidmuar wrote:I don't count the calories at all and eat as much as I want. That's me.
I'm lucky that I eat what I want when I want it, and it varies depending on how much exercise I've done.

Note the word "done".

I need to have done the exercise before I replace the calories expended, rather than eat the calories in the hope of doing exercise.

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