CTC Forum - On the road

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Updated: 2 hours 41 sec ago

Re: Had a chat with the Google Streetview man

7 July 2014 - 10:13am
Audax67 wrote:I'm extremely ****** off with Streetview and EU privacy laws just now. Their algorithm that blurs car number-plates has been applied so aggressively that it blurs out most of the town names and direction signs in France. When you're planning a coast-to-coast ride this is damnably inconvenient.

One good thing about it, though. If your routing prog takes you over a road that's probably impassable to a road bike, then the Streetview man hasn't been there either.

Indeed, I do find a good way to find routes by road bike is to zoom out a bit and lift the pegman to see where the blue lines go!

Re: Appropriate License Plate

7 July 2014 - 9:57am
The 'D' in diplomatic plates goes in the middle. For example '104D115'. I don't know if that's a real registration, but I think it would be an Australian diplomatic car.

Re: Had a chat with the Google Streetview man

7 July 2014 - 9:56am
I'm extremely ****** off with Streetview and EU privacy laws just now. Their algorithm that blurs car number-plates has been applied so aggressively that it blurs out most of the town names and direction signs in France. When you're planning a coast-to-coast ride this is damnably inconvenient.

One good thing about it, though. If your routing prog takes you over a road that's probably impassable to a road bike, then the Streetview man hasn't been there either.

Re: Had a chat with the Google Streetview man

7 July 2014 - 9:49am
I've recently discovered that google also allow users to create their own streetviews and upload them http://aseasyasridingabike.wordpress.co ... chool-run/ you can use an Android app to create the views - very handy!

Re: Appropriate License Plate

7 July 2014 - 9:42am
Vantage wrote:What the "D" stands for I'll leave to your imagination

I thought, and maybe i'm wrong on this, that "D" plates were for Diplomatic plates.

Re: Had a chat with the Google Streetview man

7 July 2014 - 9:37am
Psamathe wrote:I did hear a rumour (in the days when my poor feet allowed me to go longer distance walking) that Google were also now sending out walkers with special backpacks covering/photographing off-road paths (at least in the US and the more established official routes). Packs with a post sticking up with cameras at the top.

Ian

The first time i heard about this was shortly after the last Bond film "Skyfall", Google did the virtual tour of the island using streetview.

http://google-latlong.blogspot.co.uk/2013/06/take-stroll-through-abandoned.html

Re: Budget Commuting Bike

7 July 2014 - 9:18am
Many thanks for the above suggestions. The bike is for someone who would struggle to remember to charge up batteries so a dynamo is best I think.

Re: Budget Commuting Bike

7 July 2014 - 7:46am
Tonyf33 wrote:Each to their own re dynamos but for their relatively expensive up front cost against a set that runs for several hours with enough light to ride at a decent lick in complete darkness for £17 and not require any special wheel or other set up and can be removed for use on any other bike or handle bar in seconds I can't see why one would want to bother.
Because for commuting reliability and ease is everything. You are saving a huge amount each month compared with any other form of transport, so why wouldn't you want a vehicle you can just get on and go. I used to use battery lights, and the batteries are the pain, not the lights - Running out of batteries is not something you want to do. Faffing with batteries (and keeping them conditioned) is not something you really want to be doing every single day.

And actually bottle dynamos do work - they don't need anything special about the wheel...

Re: Budget Commuting Bike

7 July 2014 - 7:43am
Tonyf33 wrote:Each to their own re dynamos but for their relatively expensive up front cost against a set that runs for several hours with enough light to ride at a decent lick in complete darkness for £17 and not require any special wheel or other set up and can be removed for use on any other bike or handle bar in seconds I can't see why one would want to bother.

You wouldn't say that if it was a car or motorbike would you? For any vehicle to be a practical ready to go means of transport, lights fitted and always available seem to me to be an essential component. Look at the bikes used in the countries where cycling is far more the norm, Germany, Netherlands, Denmark, you hardly see a bike without dynamo lighting.

Re: Budget Commuting Bike

7 July 2014 - 3:19am
Each to their own re dynamos but for their relatively expensive up front cost against a set that runs for several hours with enough light to ride at a decent lick in complete darkness for £17 and not require any special wheel or other set up and can be removed for use on any other bike or handle bar in seconds I can't see why one would want to bother.

Re: Cycling on single-track roads

6 July 2014 - 11:10pm
Hi,
Most of devon and cornwall roads are single track, to get out of my village by any route is single track, its normal here.
The other day a white van man pickup waited for me And two cars went past me in oposite direction on an evil hill single track, they moved over and drove into the verge leaving me a good gap, both were 4 x 4's and could easily do this manouver and seem well practiced too
A gravel truck was blocking the whole lane I sped up on quickly and I stopped and pulled bike into the hedge and made myself thin , the truck past with a foot to spare and alls well.
If worse I do a "U" turn and find a gate.
Makes a change, if I dont get space then I cycle in middle and we both stop.

Re: Cycling on single-track roads

6 July 2014 - 10:05pm
Many narrow streets in my city area are effectively single track roads because of the cars parked on both sides of the road.

I find many motorists assume that a mere cyclist must wait for them to pass or get out of the way, whereas I take the view that cyclists should have priority because even on a road narrowed by parked cars a cyclist can keep to the left of the centreline, whereas a motorist needs to use both sides of the road and should wait to do so until approaching traffic on the other side of the road has passed.

As for genuine single track roads I go to Skye and the far north of Scotland a fair bit and the single track roads there are still quiet, often wide enough for a bike and a car to pass and motorists are usually very considerate.

Re: Nextbike Glasgow

6 July 2014 - 8:01pm
Glad it's working.
I find because of my size I can only ride my own bike, so if I couldn't get it on the train, that's it. I wonder if it takes the pressure off the argument for cycling provision on trains if there are hire bikes?

Re: One year ban for aggressive use of car

6 July 2014 - 7:54pm
Horse riders and their mounts regularly suffer from the same thing as we do, including getting killed. I think it may be more helpful to join with them rather than let drivers divide and rule us. Though it does cost some money to buy and keep a horse, it honestly isn't only toffs that do it. It costs about the same for a DIY livery (what most people have) as running a car, and a decent ordinary horse would cost about 3-9 grand, though of course you can pay less, or very much more, if you want to. There are more horses in the UK now than before the car was invented. Not all those owners are toffs.

Drivers are sometimes aggressive to horses/riders because they see them as toffs. It's not a helpful stereotype.

The equivalent of the CTC, the BHS, has a page in its website for reporting incidents (including an interactive map) because they find it as difficult as we do to get the authorities to take incidents seriously. Many riders I know dare not ride on the roads any more because of the overt aggression they get from drivers.

Drivers under-estimate the width of a horse+rider, just as they do the width of bikes. A friend of mine had a van smash into her stirrup, breaking it in half, damaging her leg and terrifying her horse, and that's nothing compared to what sometimes happens. People blaring their horn at us is bad- but doing it to a horse....the consequences can be much worse.
Drivers won't wait until it is safe to pass, just like with bikes.

We have the same problems, and we need to work together on this.

Re: Budget Commuting Bike

6 July 2014 - 7:33pm
For commuting I can't recommend a dynamo enough - although at this time of year you can always simply put the first "saved" tank of fuel to a second front wheel with a dynamo and some lights - if you have lots of serious unlit sections then maybe use some of the next tank as well...

Re: Budget Commuting Bike

6 July 2014 - 6:40pm
Buy near new second hand and £500 gets you nothing that's made of cheese, in fact for not a lot you could get something like this http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Specialized-G ... 19f00cc58e
I've got one, great bikes, rock solid frames that take an absolute hammering but are light and comfy. The spec is great too.
There are similar like it everywhere and instead of buying a lot lesser new bike for under £500 you could buy 2nd hand and spec up to your hearts content.
Oh and buy lights with a battery, forget dynamo.

Re: Budget Commuting Bike

6 July 2014 - 5:43pm
that's a pity - I really like my P24...very good for cross city commuting.

Re: Eyeing Up Other Bikes

6 July 2014 - 2:23pm
mercalia wrote:is called a fetish. A guy was done for that even in his own home, some where?

Are you thinking of the bloke in a hostel?

Re: Eyeing Up Other Bikes

6 July 2014 - 2:11pm
is called a fetish. A guy was done for that even in his own home, some where?

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