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Updated: 1 hour 37 min ago

Re: Help with choosing bike type and/or commute through Lond

31 July 2014 - 11:02am
aspiringcyclist wrote:One more thing, when buying a bike can you exchange a saddle for a more comfortable one for you before buying? Or do you have to pay for the bike with the existing saddle and then buy a new saddle?

Assuming you're buying new – yes you can, and if it's done at the point of sale you might get a discount . I bought through the bike to work scheme a few years ago and, on my request, the shop very kindly swapped the saddle for a Brooks, the tyres for Marathon Plus and the quick release skewers for security skewers (requiring a specific key) for the wheels. These were all at additional cost, but they gave me a discount on the tyres.

Regarding lights – there are also USB rechargeable ones that can plug into your laptop during the day. This is the one I have, although I don't use tow tow paths/unlit roads at night. If I were, I'd be inclined to invest in a more suitable front light.

http://www.rutlandcycling.com/153500/pr ... light.aspx

Vorpal wrote:If your seat post has a quick release, replace it with a bolt that requires tools, or take the saddle with you and put it in a locker, or something. Same with any detachable lights or other equipment.

+1. I always take a quick release seat post with me if I'm in central London for the day - there's generally somewhere to store it, and I can be sure of a comfortable ride home

Re: 50 mph for lorries

31 July 2014 - 9:59am
Vorpal wrote: it's only a few minutes difference in travel time.
But I am Mr Toad and must exploit the 155 mph limit of my car on all roads.

Going at 40 rather than 60 for 10 miles is a total time loss of just 5 minutes - but it *feels* like a 15 minute delay, because that's ho long the delay takes, not how long the delay is.

Traffic lights have a maximum cycle time of 120s in the UK (http://www.traffic-signal-design.com/te ... y_main.htm), although this is often reduced to 90s.
Let us assume an average of 100s and that 40% of the time they are on green.
40% of the time there is no delay on the road
60% of the time there is a delay between 60 and 0 seconds - i.e. an average of 30s.
That means the average delay from a traffic light is ~20 seconds - so passing through 3 traffic lights will delay you by ~a minute (on average)

The delay from each mile of following a vehicle at 40mph on an otherwise clear NSL road is approximately equivalent to passing *one* traffic light.

Re: Cyclist Knocked Over by Van Door

31 July 2014 - 8:34am
If your employer is good about allowing sick leave, that's good- but it would be nice for your employer to get compensation for their financial losses, just as you should for your injuries and losses, as it wasn't their fault either.
I didn't know myself that employers could have a claim against the person responsible for an accident, but now I do know, if I had a good employer I'd want them to be compensated as well as me, if that were possible. It's a rough time for a lot of employers at the moment, and rougher for the best ones who support their staff, as that makes their costs higher.

Re: 50 mph for lorries

31 July 2014 - 8:19am
IMO, overtaking safely is one of the harder things most drivers have to do. If someone doesn't have the confidence, it's safer not to overtake. In most places, the worst that likely to happen is that they go a bit slower for a few miles. Is that really all that big of a deal? Even if a queue builds up and they go for 20 miles with no place to over take, it's only a few minutes difference in travel time.

Re: 50 mph for lorries

31 July 2014 - 8:12am
Tonyf33 wrote:A lot of people are reluctant to overtake even with plenty of time/space, they just don't have the confidence to do so and are overly cautious, some people can't overtake because they get too close to the vehicle in front and can't see anything nor would be able to stop in time if the vehicle had to stop suddenly.
I've experienced many times over the years drivers whom do 35-40mph behind an HGV on a national limit carriageway but have ample space & opportunity to overtake quite leisurely but just won't.
So actually it IS these types that often create problems through not overtaking, not only do they create a hazard all of their own doing (driving too close to the vehicle in front) but hinder others who legimately and safely can make progress when wanting to overtake much slower vehicles..

Some people are just happy to be making good progress, and 40mph *is* good progress. Bring on the driverless car, the danger in the above situation is created by the reckless overtaking, not the consistent speed of the vehicle in front.

Re: Cyclist Knocked Over by Van Door

31 July 2014 - 7:43am
It's not a quick process, though sometimes the solicitors can help with that. If you are still being treated, not much can happen, anyway, except the wheels of bureaucracy grinding away. However, the solicitor probably won't take the time to call if there are no new or significant developments. If you are worried about not receiving enough information, call them and ask.

Re: 50 mph for lorries

31 July 2014 - 7:24am
So retest all drivers every 10-15 years and those who won't make progress will fail the test.

I suspect rather more gamblers who overtake without visibility will lose their licence, though.

Re: 50 mph for lorries

30 July 2014 - 11:48pm
A lot of people are reluctant to overtake even with plenty of time/space, they just don't have the confidence to do so and are overly cautious, some people can't overtake because they get too close to the vehicle in front and can't see anything nor would be able to stop in time if the vehicle had to stop suddenly.
I've experienced many times over the years drivers whom do 35-40mph behind an HGV on a national limit carriageway but have ample space & opportunity to overtake quite leisurely but just won't.
So actually it IS these types that often create problems through not overtaking, not only do they create a hazard all of their own doing (driving too close to the vehicle in front) but hinder others who legimately and safely can make progress when wanting to overtake much slower vehicles..

Re: Cyclist Knocked Over by Van Door

30 July 2014 - 11:44pm
Thanks for those points. They are both valid. Currently I am still dealing with the claim. My arm was incredibly sore for days after and I couldn't move it for a long time without discomfort. There also seems to be some longer term issues but I am having a medical examination soon to assess the severity. Nothing life changing but it causes pain where I had none previously - which was raised by the above comment with regards to long term injuries.

My employer is very good at allowing sick leave. I cant see that being an issue - although I take your point, and its an interesting point to raise to others in a similar position.


I will update in the future with my experience of C-AMS accident management who are meant to deal specifically to cyclists. So far, OK, but not enough contact. I've been called once in three weeks with little to no discussion about what I can expect to happen in the future.

Re: Ten Miles a Day

30 July 2014 - 11:11pm
Hi,

http://home.trainingpeaks.com/blog/arti ... ie-reading

"Calories Calculated with Heart Rate
Measuring energy expenditure based on heart rate has come a long way over the years along with technological improvements, and more are still popping up as we speak. There are several generations of algorithms that are derived from scientific metabolic testing, so trust that the companies aren’t just throwing numbers at you. Most of the HR based calculations are within 10-20% accurate. That’s not as close as within 5% with power, but not everyone wants to or can invest in that technology.

Most all HR devices use the basic user input metrics including gender, height, weight, and activity level combined with the heart data recorded. So the main thing with HR devices is to make sure you input as much accurate information as possible. In some devices actually inputting your tested VO2max over the device-estimated value can improve the accuracy from 20% to more like 12%. Some of the more advanced methods evolving now evaluate the time between heartbeats, called beat to beat, to estimate MET (Metabolic Equivalent), which finally is used to determine actual work expenditure. And some devices also have a “learn” function that with continued use tracks your changes in fitness and adjusts the energy algorithm. So sharing a device with a family member or friend once you may not notice different results, but frequently, then you probably would.

Calories Calculated with Time and Distance
Here is where the measure of energy expenditure really is tough to blame on the device. When there is no data reported from your body, the device is left to calculate energy expenditure based on the raw metrics including time, distance (if available), age, weight, and activity level (if device has this setting). That’s why this method can range from being 20-60% off. So, really you can’t depend on calorie estimates from a device with just these metrics. For example, a ride that may actually be 600 kcals total (500 kcals to summit a climb but a minimal 100 kcals to soft-pedal back down hill) would actually report as potentially a 960 kcal activity if the 60% inaccuracy is true. That’s substantial enough in a single workout to throw off the common -500 kcal/day deficit that often person aim for to lose 1 lb/week safely.

There are some general guidelines that exist for these calculations, but as you can see by the chart they don’t take into consideration your effort level to achieve the speed. This is a large factor because quickly you can conceptualize the difference of effort that is required to pedal at these rates; into a headwind or crosswind versus a tailwind, up a steep climb versus on the flats or descending, or even on a technical mountain bike trial versus a leisurely regional gravel path."

Re: 50 mph for lorries

30 July 2014 - 9:06pm
Or maybe that car driver intends to overtake when they consider it safe, but when they do, some gambler in a van has already started to overtake them and the lorry? That's happened to me more than once and my usual Alfa's loud pedal is not lacking in oomph, but so many people will start to overtake when they can't possibly see that it's clear, due to blind bends, dips and other obstructions. They're just assuming that oncoming traffic will take avoiding action which is partly why there are so many crashes and deaths

Re: 50 mph for lorries

30 July 2014 - 6:42pm
Re overtaking. In my experience it's not lorries moving at 40mph that cause slow-moving tail-backs, but the car drivers with no intention of overtaking that hang on to the back end of the lorries, effectively making the lorries even longer, and therefore a bigger overtaking challenge for car drivers that really do intend to overtake.

A late morning Commute along NCR 2

30 July 2014 - 6:09pm
I work from home most days. Sometimes it gets a bit lonely, so I love it when I’m off doing something else, like working wherever my job takes me, especially if I can go by bike. Yesterday, I had an appointment to see a man about a boat.

Here's some things I had time to enjoy along the way

http://www.farawayvisions.com/royal-victoria-country-park-to-gosport-a-ride-along-ncn-2/

Re: Help with choosing bike type and/or commute through Lond

30 July 2014 - 5:18pm
mjr wrote:Yes. I think pitlock is one make of unusual headed bolts and so on.


Thanks.

Re: Ring, ring?

30 July 2014 - 5:12pm
Norfolk county council has solved this by letting some cycleways deteriorate so far that your bell almost always rings if you ride fast enough.

Re: Help with choosing bike type and/or commute through Lond

30 July 2014 - 5:09pm
Yes. I think pitlock is one make of unusual headed bolts and so on.

Re: Camera question - what do you use

30 July 2014 - 5:05pm
JamesE wrote:Vladimir wrote:how come?
Couldn't afford it at the time, have actually been finding drivers much more polite over the last couple of months. Maybe it's the weather...

yes - to be honest the "burning desire" for a helmet cam does come and go for me every 4-6 months and it is connected with close passes, verbal abuse from drivers, or other negative experience.

In reality, so far, things on the road for me have been fine - i.e. I've only crashed once* in 4 years. Based on that track record (no pun intended) things are going to continue to be fine... until they're not! I am definitely getting one this time. Might start with me recording my rides with my phone, and move on from there.


* (I got off with only a bruise and a £75 repair bill to replace the front wheel)

Re: Help with choosing bike type and/or commute through Lond

30 July 2014 - 5:01pm
Vorpal wrote:Why don't you have a shop do a service on your Raleigh? Even if it hasn't been well maintained, it may not take much to put it back into a rideable condition.

If nothing else, maybe the Raleigh can be your bad weather /winter bike? I think it will take winter tyres? If you have it serviced you can ask the shop.

When commuting daily, it's good to have a second bike for lots of reasons. The biggest is that if one bike needs some maintenance, you have an alternative while you work on it/find parts, etc.

Make some bike-savvy friends at school and learn to do your own maintenance. It will save you money

As for security... yes, having a rubbish looking bike will help. If nothing else, you can do a custom paint job with some Hammerite

For locking it, the best thing to do is to carry two locks of different types. One to lock the frame and back wheel to something substantial, and the other to lock the front wheel to the frame, or to something else, depending what is available. Any lock can be broken, but if yours is much more trouble than the others around, it will probably be left alone. That's my bike security philosophy. If your seat post has a quick release, replace it with a bolt that requires tools, or take the saddle with you and put it in a locker, or something. Same with any detachable lights or other equipment.

A few reasons. I'm not the only one who uses it so it would be useful to have another. My mum can commute by bike to work, for example. It is also a bit heavy ( 16.5 kg ) and slower than other bikes. I would prefer a bike is more suited to the roads as I said. I do intend to do my own maintenance as far as possible, especially as it will be much more necessary. I have been reading the book on bike maintenance by Lennard Zinn.

I do already use that locking technique. I see so many other bikes locked badly so mine isn't as easy pickings. Is it possible to replace bots and screws with ones that have a less common head type to prevent simple unscrewing with a hex key or Phillips head screwdriver?

Re: Camera question - what do you use

30 July 2014 - 4:46pm
Vladimir wrote:how come?
Couldn't afford it at the time, have actually been finding drivers much more polite over the last couple of months. Maybe it's the weather...

Re: Ribble Winter Audax bike

30 July 2014 - 4:44pm
I run my Ribble 7005 Audax with 23/24/25mm tyres without having to do any fettling at all. Tyres are all Vittoria (Rubino Pro-tech, Open Pave, Open Pro CG Tech), the mudguards are (I think) SKS square as opposed to the smooother rounder ones. in the narrower size, and brakes are Campag centaur normal drop.

I have however discovered water ingress down the seat tube, leading to creaky BB as there was a layer of oxidation between the BB and the frame. Cleaned it all out and now searching for ingress point to block it

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