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Re: When its OK to drop a cycling buddy

25 August 2014 - 5:51pm
But you are certainly right that when you're riding with someone you feel obligated to keep up and not take as many breaks as you otherwise would.

Re: When its OK to drop a cycling buddy

25 August 2014 - 5:02pm
freeflow wrote:I may not have phrased the original question as well as I should.For the record, I thought your OP was perfectly clear. And I think you did the right thing in giving your companion the option. That he chose not to exercise it, was his decision.

The point I made in my earlier post was that, unlike you and your companion, and I'm sure the majority of posters on this forum, there are I'm afraid some incredibly selfish cyclists about. And social networks thereof. I'm not about to name any specific forum because I don't need to!

Re: When its OK to drop a cycling buddy

25 August 2014 - 4:51pm
I may not have phrased the original question as well as I should. The difficulty here is that it is not a rider just disappearing off. That's pretty unacceptable. But instead a competent but struggling rider encouraging a buddy to ride on.

On saturday there was no question that I would not finish, but I whilst my buddy was willing to ride slower it still put pressure on me to ride faster than I wanted and to do so with fewer stops. If my buddy had followed my advice and ridden on then I could have slowed my pace for a while to get my energy levels back up, and I could have stopped for short period more frequently to rest my knee and eat/drink.

Of course there is always the ego thing in that I didn't want to be continually saying, can we go slower please.

If I am accompanying a struggling rider, I will, if I can, ride besides or behind the rider. I'll only go in front if there is a strong headwind or if I'm specifically requested to do so.

Re: When its OK to drop a cycling buddy

25 August 2014 - 4:39pm
If there is a rider in physical difficulty, never, never, NEVER leave them.

Your friendship will be rewarded many times more than a stupid little medal.

Re: Help with choosing bike type and/or commute through Lond

25 August 2014 - 4:22pm
So I rid up to the point of leaving the towpath on my commute route and was completely drenched. I'd say the biggest problem were the puddles which occupied the entire width of the path. Mudguards helped, but not enough. Making the commute practical will be difficult in those conditions.

Re: Four 4x4's on a forty mile ride

25 August 2014 - 1:54pm
Give women drivers, SUVs, 4X4s etc. a break, the real culprits for close passes (here in London) are buses, taxis and minicabs.

Re: Four 4x4's on a forty mile ride

25 August 2014 - 1:52pm
lisap wrote:Thank goodness I'm not a farmer then.

Phew that was close!

Re: Shock finding: cycling causes weight loss

25 August 2014 - 12:30pm
Garry, apart from the pie crust, this should suit you nicely then?

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healt ... plate.html



Al

Re: Four 4x4's on a forty mile ride

25 August 2014 - 11:55am
Thank goodness I'm not a farmer then.

Re: When its OK to drop a cycling buddy

25 August 2014 - 10:56am
I don't have any cycling buddies either - though I do go on pootles with Mrs P - I'm usually a bit faster than she, partly due to me being on a road bike as against her hybrid, but... Once or twice we've ended up taking different turnings at a junction (my mistake) and then mobile phones become indispensible!

I do recall being dropped rather gratuitously when out on a supposed 'leisure' ride with several forum members of - well, let's just say, "Another Place"... Of course I'm slower than the average, but I thought the whole credo of the so-called 'leisure' or 'fun' ride was, Thou Shalt Not Get Dropped. It seems not! - at least, not with those t***ers. Anyway, I ended up stranded in unfamiliar territory without a map (more fool me! never again!) - but luckily, while I was stopped at a junction in some bewilderment, another straggler behind me turned up who knew the area, so eventually I got reunited with the bunch. I don't recall whether I was polite to them or not: certainly they didn't deserve it for what they did...

I think the general rule is, as others have stated, if you think your companion will have difficulties, don't drop him/her. Otherwise...

Re: Four 4x4's on a forty mile ride

25 August 2014 - 9:45am
my 4x4 is covered in mud from being on the farm every day

Shush! Don't let on that you might be a farmer as well otherwise they really will stick the boot in

Re: When its OK to drop a cycling buddy

25 August 2014 - 9:42am
Most of my rides are solo but I do ride with a friend occasionally. He's faster than me at climbing so he always leaves me on the climbs but waits for me at the top. Which I think is fair enough we both want to climb at our own pace. We ride together on the flat.

Re: When its OK to drop a cycling buddy

25 August 2014 - 9:41am
On things like audaxes I'm happy enough to leave people for the carrion to pick over their festering corpses, as long as there wasn't an agreement that I was to be looking after them. I say this due to having been on the other end a few times: I've been riding with people when I've hit the wall and told them to go on without me to which they have refused......this has led to me feeling guilty because of slowing them down, to them having to do the ride at a speed that they wouldn't have chosen too, and to me making my situation worse by trying to go faster than I was able to just to reduce the amount by which I slowed them. Thus, although I've appreciated the generosity and kindness of their actions it has led to all concerned suffering more than they needed to.

Re: Bwlch y Groes

25 August 2014 - 9:33am
When I did it I had to pedal down half the north side because of the head winds

But the climb up from the south was fun - even got on someone's wedding photos that were being done in the hamlet at the bottom as we passed through

Re: When its OK to drop a cycling buddy

25 August 2014 - 9:10am
Audax67 wrote:Only time I've done it was on PBP 2007 when my partner decided to give up in Brest.

There are two sides to it, though: I rode one particular 400 with folk quite a bit younger and stronger than me. Being good friends they said "we'll keep the speed down" but they couldn't: I probably couldn't have either if the situation had been reversed. So I ended up riding a notch or two over my capacity until breaking-point, when at last they accepted what I'd been telling them all along, i.e. I'd be better alone. Seeing them disappear into the darkness was an immense relief. I finished within the time by around 15 minutes, nursing cramp and tendinitis the whole way.
As a slow Audax rider I am sometimes overtaken by another rider who for the best of social reasons decides to ride "with" me. This usually involves me having to make a gradual acceleration so that we are riding at his/her chosen speed. As I don't find this comfortable I try to lag behind saying things like" Don't wait for me - I'll only hold you up", most eventually ride away - but some are insistent on staying with me - albeit halfwheeling me. I don't know of a polite way of dealing with this.
I rarely ride an Audax with a companion - if I do it has to be someone as slow as myself - also most of us go through strong and weak periods during a long ride so this has to be accepted. On these occasions one accepts that if the other rider has a problem that comes before completing the Audax.
On the rare occasions that I catch another rider I ride past and just check that they are o.k.
I'm always willing to stop and help with a puncture or mechanical though.
On club runs I always wait for anyone having difficulty keeping up. This is as it should be - but sometimes I find some in the group don't have much concern for stragglers.

Re: Four 4x4's on a forty mile ride

25 August 2014 - 9:10am
james01 wrote:lisap wrote:I live in a very hilly place, my 4x4 is covered in mud from being on the farm every day AND when it snows I wouldn't get off my property without it.



You could try walking . I'm being slightly facetious but the description of a farm or village being cut off is now used in the press simply when motor vehicles can't get through. It used to mean when people on foot couldn't get through - now that's what I call being really cut off .

I agree that being cut off and not getting out are very different and yes I could walk the 8 mile round trip to the farm but I chose to use a vehicle which is designed for the terrain and conditions. It's warmer and doesn't take as long

Re: Fell off on a sort of tramline - advice please?

25 August 2014 - 8:47am
"The point is that no matter who reports defects and no matter how bad they are, the response of the highway authority may still leave a lot to be desired (to put it politely.)"

In your opinion, apparently not of judges, who are the ones who count

Re: Shock finding: cycling causes weight loss

25 August 2014 - 8:40am
al_yrpal wrote:If I wasnt dieting I wouldnt be counting anything. After 8 months you are well aware of whats what. I havent actually counted anything for weeks until today. Dont like the sound of your diet Garry, you are welcome to it. Thought you all lived on spuds?

Al

Grooving tonite… War on Drugs, Imagine Dragons and Alcest

We used to. I'm not a huge fan of spuds apart from grilled salmon with new potatoes and garden peas. A king fit for a dish..

Re: When its OK to drop a cycling buddy

25 August 2014 - 8:10am
Only time I've done it was on PBP 2007 when my partner decided to give up in Brest.

There are two sides to it, though: I rode one particular 400 with folk quite a bit younger and stronger than me. Being good friends they said "we'll keep the speed down" but they couldn't: I probably couldn't have either if the situation had been reversed. So I ended up riding a notch or two over my capacity until breaking-point, when at last they accepted what I'd been telling them all along, i.e. I'd be better alone. Seeing them disappear into the darkness was an immense relief. I finished within the time by around 15 minutes, nursing cramp and tendinitis the whole way.

Re: When its OK to drop a cycling buddy

25 August 2014 - 6:12am
I would be reluctant to leave a friend behind, even if s/he told me that it was okay. I would assume that if s/he said I should just go & not worry about him/her that it was said only for my sake.

I wouldn't feel right leaving a friend behind, even if it meant riding in the dark without lights.

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