CTC Forum - On the road

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Updated: 1 hour 3 min ago

Re: Ten Miles a Day

28 July 2014 - 2:19pm
Starting to struggle to keep the average above 24. Got to 24.29, but its dropped to 24.07

Re: Ring, ring?

28 July 2014 - 2:13pm
Air Zound
Hornit

Most of the time I just whistle and/or talk

Re: Ribble Winter Audax bike

28 July 2014 - 2:10pm
Yes ithe ribble is a good all year round bike. If you want bikes of similar ilke to compare try searching on Audax

Ribble Winter Audax bike

28 July 2014 - 1:34pm
Hi, thinking about buying this bike - would it be fine for summer weekend rides as well as winter training commmuting ?

The other bike I was thinking of is Specialized Roubaix 2014 - but just a summer bike i think. I have a tourer I could use for winter(though reluctant to use as it is heavy).
Be grateful for your advice.

Thank you

Re: Ring, ring?

28 July 2014 - 12:05pm
If you have a pinger then ring it two or three times quickly. Bizarrely this seems to annoy people less. Maybe it is becuase it repeats the pattern of hello or good morning rather than an oi or hey.

I like the dutchish pingpong bells but they are not as well known here as the rotary brrring.

Re: Ring, ring?

28 July 2014 - 12:01pm
freeflow wrote:I find that the most positive reception to voice is if you say good morning etc followed by a short pause then your request. If folks don't respond to the good morning then you know they haven't heard you. If they do hear then they usually turn to look at you and that makes the next request more engaging. This works particularly well for horse riders who generally appreciate the advnaced warning and the opportunity to prepare thier horse for your passing.

Wouldn't work where I am. The roads are clogged with crowds of tourists all chattering amongst themselves or concentrating on each other or the photo they're trying to take while completely blocking the road. A "Good Morning" would not even get heard. A proper bike bell continuously rung gets through after about 5 seconds or so and then you have to wait while they reorganise themselves to not completely block the road or path. But I admit that's not typical of most of the country.

Re: Ring, ring?

28 July 2014 - 11:47am
I find that the most positive reception to voice is if you say good morning etc followed by a short pause then your request. If folks don't respond to the good morning then you know they haven't heard you. If they do hear then they usually turn to look at you and that makes the next request more engaging. This works particularly well for horse riders who generally appreciate the advnaced warning and the opportunity to prepare thier horse for your passing.

Re: dog causes accident

28 July 2014 - 11:46am
Ontherivet77 wrote:Pete Owens wrote:If this was an incident on the road - where a cyclist had stopped for some reason (any reason) and an Audi had plowed into the back of them, then there would be no dispute whatsoever here that the Audi driver was at fault. They should be able to stop in the distance they can see to be clear.

We are talking about a shared use path - a place where pedestrians have priority and where walking dogs as a perfectly acceptable. A dog wandering erratically about a path does not constitute being out of control. "out of control" means jumping up at people nipping cyclists ankles and so on. It is up to cyclists to look where they are going and to be able to stop if necessary (whether that is for a group of pedestrians, a dog or even a cyclist stopping in front of you).
+1

If the dog was in control, then the owner should be prosecuted for telling the dog to run across the cyclists. You can't have it both ways.
Personally, I'd also cut a child more slack for not having judged her stopping distance perfectly for the conditions than I would an adult dog owner for not being in control of their dog. But hey, that's just me.

Re: Cruelty to bikes

28 July 2014 - 11:42am
squeaker wrote:timdownieuk wrote:I had never realised that Contador couldn't ride properly.Quite He was reaching for his pocket and the bike was swept away under him, probably because of a bump or hole in the road.

What amazes me is that even with a broken leg he rode on afterwards far faster than I can do when in prefect health .

Back to the topic, I was asked to look at a bike that wasn't performing as well as it had been when acquired some months earlier, and as I walked towards it, I asked my friend casually when she'd last oiled it (so I would know how messy my job might be) and when she said 'Oil?' I reckoned I'd got the diagnosis right there. As indeed I had. A bit of 3-in1 and it was all hunky dory again.

I can never understand why people don't listen to machinery. Machines, like people, do try to tell you when they need attention. If a machine starts making a grinding, or knocking, or squeaking noise, it's usually worth a check or two.

Re: Shared/Cycle path . . . . I'm too slow.

28 July 2014 - 11:12am
I also have no problem with leisure routes or greenways but I object to so much of a so called sustainable transport network being low speed routes that the sustainable transport charity criticises people for wanting to travel at an easily achievable cycling speed instead of splitting the network into transport and leisure routes.

Re: Ring, ring?

28 July 2014 - 11:02am
reohn2 wrote:WMarkLancs wrote:Why shout?

I appreciate people will get varying mileage, but I have had good results (i.e. no abuse at all) from simply saying variations of "Excuse me", "Passing by on your right" and so on.
This is in varying parts of the country, so it isn't a local thing. But it could be in the tone of voice.
+1
I tend to say ''ding,ding'' on approach,followed by ''could I just squeeze past please'' or ''hello,could I get past please''.

I also do this... But I have ended up getting bellified, having had a few experiences of being scowled at for not using a bell, even though I find the personal touch more friendly, so now I'll do both quite often, or judge the situation- speak/'vocalise' (ding ding) 1st usually, then bell, then speak again. My Vaya's (green ) bell makes a nice ting-tong, which I find friendlier than the ping of the single bell (as on my Orange ).

I also tend to sing, mutter and make noises (talking to the animals mostly) while riding along in a world of my own, which also happens to alert folk too...

Re: Ring, ring?

28 July 2014 - 10:59am
Never mind about elderly folk not being able to hear bells, most of the blithe young things on the paths can't hear'em either because they're busy damaging their ears with canned muzak piped through earplugs.

Hum. The wind has quite an effect too. I've had folk 100 yards downwind react to bells that folk 20 yards upwind couldn't hear. If I remember my school physics correctly, this is because a headwind pushes the wavefront of the sound up into the air so that it never reaches them, but a tailwind keeps it down.

Re: Shared/Cycle path . . . . I'm too slow.

28 July 2014 - 10:51am
Then again, not all paths to which cyclists have access need to be suitable for high speed cycling. High speed cycling would be incompatible with the purpose and character of some paths and would cause a nuisance to others. Indeed, in some cases agreement to allow cyclists to somewhere they have not previously had access (eg. many towpaths) is on the understanding that it won't attract high speed cyclists. A lot of Sustrans routes are okay leisure routes rather than strategic cycle expressways. I don't mind as I see these as being in addition to the ordinary road network. I get much more annoyed where I cannot use a road because it has been turned into a pseudo-motorway or where I am expected to use a piece of substandard infrastructure. Entirely new routes are a bonus, but anything which is being presented as an alternative to a road should be at least as convenient as a road.

Re: Shared/Cycle path . . . . I'm too slow.

28 July 2014 - 10:01am
Bicycler wrote:mjr wrote:Lovely quote from Sustrans there admitting they've not been leading a SUStainable TRANSport network and been acting in a basically ultra vires or at least misleading manner.
I don't know. There's a difference between being a useful route for everyday cyclists and being suitable for high-speed wannabe racing
There is also a difference between travelling quickly and wannabe racing. Travelling quickly is a basic part of transport because sometimes you need to be in a place at a set time and other times the things which facilitate quick movement also make it easier to move heavy loads or travel less sweatily. But sustrans says no if you want to travel quickly. Almost makes me glad that our routes were mostly built first and sustransed later.
Are more cycle friendly countries any more accepting of high speed cyclists speeding past groups of pedestrians? In truth, even their infrastructure doesn't look safe for high speeds. Any footage from Holland which gets shown seems to show relatively sedate cycling as the norm. Not many UK style commuters bombing along on road bikes trying to beat their PB on their strava segment.
As Easy As Riding has posted some pictures of racers on cycleways in Holland on his site. They do not attract the same attention as the utility cyclists becuase we have lots of racers in the UK already. It is the normal riders who are rare outside a few hotspots. Not all of the normal looking riders are moving that slowly on wide open cycleways either! You can't tell speed from a photo.

Are the Dutch as into Strava? Does it hold the same attraction when fast riding is easier? We have taken a wrong turn in the UK and created an environment where cycling is too much of a gladatorial challenge. I am working to change that as is CTC and I would welcome help overcoming the misguided "cycleways should not be for travelling quickly" rhetoric of Sustrans.

Re: Ring, ring?

28 July 2014 - 9:50am
brynpoeth wrote:A bell that goes drring drring makes a lovely sound and people know it is a bike.
In contrast, pingy bells sound impatient, and when I had those people often used to tell me where to go, if you know what I mean, but I've had no probs since I got a rotary bell. But sometimes people just don't respond, even though I'm pretty sure they heard. I think that sometimes people are so completely oblivious that they are in a shared space, that even if they hear it they think it's nothing to do with them.

And there was the time I came up behind a deaf rambling club, out for a walk on the busy local cycle path.

Re: 50 mph for lorries

28 July 2014 - 9:35am
This morning whilst whizzing down a hill at 40mph in a 40mph zone I had this misfortune to be caught by an articulated HGV and then tailgated by said vehicle.
Then to my surprise the driver decided on a suicidal overtake on a blind bend, I quickly scrubbed loads of speed to ensure the end of the trailer passed me as soon as possible, in the event he swerved back in.
It is ironic that one of the so called justifications for upping the limit is safety

Re: dog causes accident

28 July 2014 - 9:34am
Pete Owens wrote:If this was an incident on the road - where a cyclist had stopped for some reason (any reason) and an Audi had plowed into the back of them, then there would be no dispute whatsoever here that the Audi driver was at fault. They should be able to stop in the distance they can see to be clear.

We are talking about a shared use path - a place where pedestrians have priority and where walking dogs as a perfectly acceptable. A dog wandering erratically about a path does not constitute being out of control. "out of control" means jumping up at people nipping cyclists ankles and so on. It is up to cyclists to look where they are going and to be able to stop if necessary (whether that is for a group of pedestrians, a dog or even a cyclist stopping in front of you).
+1

Re: 50 mph for lorries

28 July 2014 - 9:27am
Does anyone have a link to the consultation ?

Re: Shared/Cycle path . . . . I'm too slow.

28 July 2014 - 8:53am
Sustrans do say their paths have a design speed of 12mph, but I'm also sure that's not by design that's just how they've ended up!

DfT guidance says that if you're wanting to do more than 18mph, then you should be using the road, but of course that's not a speed limit by any sense, just guidance.

Re: Shared/Cycle path . . . . I'm too slow.

28 July 2014 - 8:48am
Phil Fouracre wrote:What a clown! In all seriousness, I thought there was an 'advised' maximum speed for bikes on cycle paths. I assumed that you were then 'promoted' to the road!!:-)

I seem to recall that though there isn't a limit, the surfaces are, in theory, designed for speeds up to 12 mph. Which is borne out by how lousy some of the surfaces are.
I use that argument as yet another reason for why I'm on the road when there is a cycle track on the pavement, as even my average speed is much higher than that.

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