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Updated: 2 hours 23 min ago

Re: Pedestrians' view of bells ?

28 July 2015 - 3:09pm
Tangled Metal wrote:What is a good bell to get BTW? My son bought me a large dringdring bell for fathers day but it has a bracket too small for my handlebars. The bars are wide in the un-taped part and the stem is too big too. I'm kind of on the lookout for a very small and good looking bell that is effective but also discrete or that adds to the look somehow. Not too expensive would be good too.
What sort of bars? The mention of tape makes me think we're probably talking typical drop bar size (15/16ths inch) and yes, most nice bells are really designed for modern upright size (⅞ths) which you can fit to an old-style stem. On a modern bike, you either have a limited choice (Lion or Crane bells, which are basically richer pingers but compare well https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yo76L7S7DzM - or harder-to-find imports like Spanninga and Widek which either ding-dong or brring often have bands that will open enough for road bars) or bodging your own bracket to fit.

Do you have a good bike shop nearby that will let you test them?

Sorry that there's no easy answer - such is the UK market at the moment Maybe if more start asking for good bells, more places will stock them?

Re: Loose stones on the road

28 July 2015 - 3:00pm
Lawrie9 wrote:We often hear about pot holes and the damage hey cause but there seems to be a lot of loose stones, scree and stuff that has washed off hillsides from landslips. I had to replace a front wheet from hitting a stone and it seems to be that the cutbacks has meant more stones and debris is left on the roads.
I notice that you live in Powys. From what I'm reading in the local press it seems they are making some dire cutbacks in spending to stick with the grand plan for austerity. They also have a very extensive road network to up-keep.

Here in Shropshire, the roads are being kept in what I would describe as a 'just about acceptable' state. Any worse and it will be unacceptable.

Re: Pedestrians' view of bells ?

28 July 2015 - 3:00pm
I found that people were less likely to turn round startled when I used a dringdring style of bell, so that's what I now use. I think that perhaps the distinctive sound is more readily associated with a bicycle (at least to British ears).

Re: Horses: modern ones selected from what stock?

28 July 2015 - 2:54pm
I would have thought the problem is more the training of the animal rather than the breeding of.
I don't have experience of horse training, although I've seen some informative examples over the years on Countryfile, especially that of army or police horses. It will surely take extra training to get an animal prepared for scary things. Perhaps most horse owners skimp on this aspect of the training.

Considering how poorly a great many dogs are trained, this doesn't surprise me.

Re: Pedestrians' view of bells ?

28 July 2015 - 2:11pm
There is a mixed use bridge on my way home that has a real mix of users from cyclists to pedestrians to dog walkers to mothers/fathers with prams. I used to have a bell on my bike and used it. However I found that people were idiots. You found them turning and just moving in front of you. Or if in a group one turns gives you a dirty look then carries on as a group walking across the bridge with barely enough space for you to pass. If you do pass then they give abuse.

I am not saying it is everyone but on that one stretch a bell seems to annoy people so I stopped using it. It is easier and less hassle/abuse if I just cycle up to them and past them quickly without a fuss. This is the opposite to that on a local towpath. A bell worked well there. The shout "excuse me" or "bike" also works well there. The only people it does not work on is the few elderly out for a potter with a little pooch. The regulars fitting that description seem to all be slightly deaf. Some older people also think that they have a lot more right and expect you to stay behind them or at least dismount first.

Dogs are a big issue. Dog owners know their pooches but I do not. How am I supposed to know if your dog is going to stay sat there without a lead or any sign of control from you? I treat all dogs and their owners with distrust. What I mean is I will assume one or both of them will jump out at me and I take car accordingly. I have nothing against them it is just my experience. Also dog mess in plastic bags is worse than dog mess without plastic bags IMHO.

As an aside, some types of mixed path users will never hear or react to a bell. Even a 120dB horn would not get a reaction or if it did it would be abuse. That is what I have experienced. As a commuter and someone with a kid who rides a lot of the local mixed use paths as a leisure rider and commuter this is my findings. A real mixed bag.

What is a good bell to get BTW? My son bought me a large dringdring bell for fathers day but it has a bracket too small for my handlebars. The bars are wide in the un-taped part and the stem is too big too. I'm kind of on the lookout for a very small and good looking bell that is effective but also discrete or that adds to the look somehow. Not too expensive would be good too.

Re: Boris' backie

28 July 2015 - 12:32pm
Stevek76 wrote:"Not more than one person may be carried on a road on a bicycle not propelled by mechanical power unless it is constructed or adapted for the carriage of more than one person."

A prize for the person who can make that clearer! The two 'not's don't help ; 'propelled by mechanical power' seems clumsy, but I can't think of anything better at the moment; the person 'carried' could be construed as a passenger.

How about:
A human powered bicycle may carry one person only unless it is constructed or adapted for the carriage of more than one person.
?

Re: Boris' backie

28 July 2015 - 12:09pm
Ah, makes sense, mis understood what was meant by 'mechanically propelled', misread it as manually propelled.

Re: Boris' backie

28 July 2015 - 12:05pm
Electric bikes are not considered mechanically propelled.

Re: Pedestrians' view of bells ?

28 July 2015 - 12:05pm
There will be always be the odd person with a chip on their shoulder who takes issue with being "rang at". Personally I think a bell rung in plenty of time surely beats having to shout "excuse me!" from sufficient distance for it to be adequate warning, and comes over as far more polite!

Re: Boris' backie

28 July 2015 - 11:46am
I believe that it applies to bicycles which are not mechanically propelled; that is most pedal cycles.

Re: Boris' backie

28 July 2015 - 11:37am
"Not more than one person may be carried on a road on a bicycle not propelled by mechanical power unless it is constructed or adapted for the carriage of more than one person."

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1988/52/section/24

Been wondering this since the story broke but the press are just unquestioningly parroting the story so no hope there. The bit I've bolded would suggest this law only applies to electric bikes etc? I know the law can be a little obtuse at times but it's rarely so daft it acually means the opposite of what it is written.

The alternative would mean that this does not apply to electric bikes???

Re: Hi Viz plod gets space

28 July 2015 - 11:17am
ferdinand wrote:I quite like it, though it does look a little distinctive.

It seems to be single sided (may be wrong on that) from the piccie on the website, so do you wear the panel facing forwards or backwards?

(Edit: perhaps that is the zip pocket).

Ferdinand

Yes, the zip pocket is at the front.

Re: Boris' backie

28 July 2015 - 10:56am
What is dangerous is relative and depends upon conditions. I have seen people sharing Boris-bikes on a few occasions, but on observing them doing it while going the wrong way up a busy one-way street, it is the latter that worries me more for the riders' safety. But again, these things are relative. I am, at the moment, routinely using a 10yd stretch of temporary 1-way street (due to construction works) in the wrong direction, as do many other cyclist passing there, as we have tried the alternatives and they are worse. You can just wait until there's nothing coming and it's Not A Problem.

About 12 years ago I saw BoJo cycling up the Strand while talking into a hand-held mobile phone. At the time, the road, in his direction of travel, was entirely full of standing traffic. Such is the narrow width of the lanes on the Strand, it is very challenging to cycle at all on the Strand when it is so full of standing traffic - you usually can't get past a bus in such conditions without leaving the carriageway. Indeed, even though I worked on the Strand, I used to avoid cycling on the Strand if it could at all be avoided - my usual routes avoided it entirely. But to be attempting it while talking on a hand-held mobile was a challenge indeed.

Re: Boris' backie

27 July 2015 - 11:27pm
thirdcrank wrote:If I've read the linked BBC article correctly, the suitability or otherwise of the rack isn't an issue

It shows Ms Wheeler sitting on the saddle, without a helmet, holding her handbag as her husband stands on the pedals.


Have we got to the state now where saddles are expected to wear helmets too?

Re: Boris' backie

27 July 2015 - 10:24pm
If I've read the linked BBC article correctly, the suitability or otherwise of the rack isn't an issue

It shows Ms Wheeler sitting on the saddle, without a helmet, holding her handbag as her husband stands on the pedals.

You couldn't make it up. He's claiming ignorance of the law about cycling while giving a saddle to a barrister called "Wheeler."

It's the silly season.

Re: Pedestrians' view of bells ?

27 July 2015 - 9:53pm
Haven't found a place to put one on my new bike, but for the last 1000k no-one I've met on cycle paths has taken a friendly hello badly.

For the sake of passing the PBP bike check I'll maybe mount one under the saddle.

Re: Boris' backie

27 July 2015 - 9:09pm
I'd have thought the manufacturer's claim of suitability should be good enough. Maybe you should go the whole hog and get a seat http://www.cyclechicrepublic.com/27-bac ... t-cushions

The RTA says "constructed or adapted". I'd say that's adapted

Re: Boris' backie

27 July 2015 - 8:55pm
My Dutch bike's rack is rated to carry the weight of a person as long as they're not too heavy and doing so is mentioned in the maker's advertising ("Perfect for pannier bags, shopping and most importantly: the Dutch way of giving your mates a lift!"). Anyone know if that would count as constructed to carry two people in the sense of the RTA?

London hire bikes are even heavier than my Dutchie, so it seems like they could easily double the system's user capacity if they put a sturdy rear rack on them!

Re: Boris' backie

27 July 2015 - 8:01pm
I really have gone off the BBC. I'm no politician or conservative supporter but I've always liked Boris. He knows how to have fun and I guess so does his wife! Good on him for being so restrained with all those interfering, controlling numpties...b

Re: Boris' backie

27 July 2015 - 7:35pm
P-poor journalism as per usual. Still searching for the "1998 Road and Traffic Act"

But, yeah, I totally agree it's another of those things which is not dangerous https://aseasyasridingabike.wordpress.c ... dangerous/

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