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Re: Primary line issue this morning

29 June 2015 - 8:56pm
Well done for keeping afloat there! The M/cyclist obviously made a mistake and seems to have admitted it. Wouldn't have been much comfort if you were KSI'd...

Tram lines are a real menace - we are fortunate in SE England in being mostly spared them (Croydon and Wimbledon excepted). I suppose the urban planners whose line of thinking is "we've got to have trams - everwhere else does" don't stop for a moment to consider cyclists .

How easy would it be to design tram rails which are not a cycling hazard? I'm thinking on the lines of some sort of rubber insert, which would be depressed by the tram wheels but otherwise remain flush with the road surface. A bit of googling and I turned up this. If it works for Switzerland why can't it be used here?

Alternatively, there's always the trolleybus. No hazard for cyclists (apart from the usual issues of cycling close to large vehicles). Trolleybuses are practically the norm for urban transport in many parts of the world, especially Russia and the former Soviet bloc. What have the Brits got against them?

National Grid driver +18

29 June 2015 - 8:46pm
How can this chap not see the cyclist? Totally the drivers fault. I hope they reported the incident

Video contains strong language

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=b7d_1435361947

Re: Primary line issue this morning

29 June 2015 - 8:39pm
At that speed I didn't have much choice. I couldn't do an emergency stop because of the surface. I didn't continue left as I knew he was there - so had to go straight on. Had it been wet or had I had thinner tyres on it would have been a different outcome. Basically, if someone was behind me one moment and then decided to pass on the left leaving me choices that each had a potentially bad outcome. Had I continued my manoeuvre, I would definitely have been a goner. Keeping straight without slowing seemed the best way of not falling foul of the tram lines.

Re: Primary line issue this morning

29 June 2015 - 8:31pm
His fault of course. But also avoidable by you by checking over your L shoulder before swinging in.

I was almost taken out at 6am by a faster cyclist undertaking me in the 3 ft gap between me and the kerb. I'd left the cycle lane by a few inches to avoid a bad surface and this idiot undertook me rather than move out on to the traffic free road. This may have been before I started using a mirror so I didn't know he was there until I shoulder checked.

Primary line issue this morning

29 June 2015 - 8:10pm
Riding into work this morning. Was heading along this stretch of road:

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.40063 ... 312!8i6656

You may just be able to see the tram tracks under the silver van. When I ride along here, I ride primary and then hook a left so that I can cross the tram lines at a steep angle. I then ride secondary alongside the tram lines. Never had a problem - got to watch out as it is slightly downhill and there are a few side streets entering onto the road.

Anyway, this morning, around 06:30 - was doing my usual. I knew that there was a moped behind me and a car behind it. As I was cutting over the tram lines, the moped overtook me on the left. I just spotted him out of the corner of my eye before he went past. I had to then change course and stay in primary (or hit him). Unfortunately, staying in primary means that my angle over the lines was extremely shallow. Bit of a brown shorts moment but I managed to not come off.

Legged it after him and caught him up at the next lights that were just changing to green. Pulled alongside him and said, "you're an idiot". I did well not to add any swear words or smack him one. He said something back - not sure what it was but I think that he had already realised that he was close to taking me out. What shocked me as much as his manoeuvre was the fact that this wasn't some spotty youth but someone that looked about my age (forties).

The good news was that I was so wound up I knocked over half a minute off my ride in time.

Re: Please help!

29 June 2015 - 8:09pm
I had some knee problems using cleats, though I don't know if they were the cause. Anyhow I switched to some platform pedals fron Clas Ohlson. They cost me no more than £4 for a pair and I rode for 12 months with these. Club runs everything. I never noticed that they affected my performance in any way.

Re: Another death and inadequate sentence

29 June 2015 - 6:02pm
I suppose the argument is that it gets an unproportional amount of press coverage because it's a rare occurrence, apparently around 40 pedestrians a year are killed on the pavement or verges a year. Although that's from this 2009 article.


http://www.theguardian.com/environment/ ... g-pavement

Re: Another death and inadequate sentence

29 June 2015 - 5:43pm
There is no getting around the fact that this sort of behaviour is bad for all cyclists.

Making statements about cars would appear to me to be trying to shift the blame for the death of this Lady. A total waste of a life.

Re: Another death and inadequate sentence

29 June 2015 - 10:51am
Let us remember that the great majority of vehicle/pedestrians collisions which occur on the footway, as opposed to in the roadway, involve a motorised vehicle. It is sadly common for people to run their own children over, there was even a case in the news this morning. The sharing of footways between cyclist and pedestrians is fairly common in this country, and even more common in some other countries, where they don't seem to find cycling such an emotive issue.

Suppose a lout had just been pushing their way aggressively along the footway as a pedestrian and knocked an old person over so that they hit their head on the ground and died. What kind of sentence would have resulted? I think that is really the comparison one should make.

Re: Close pass - by a driver who should have known better

28 June 2015 - 6:45pm
Yup I'd agree with all the comments about riding further out. Certainly agree with safety being more important than holding drivers up. To be quite honest I'd far rather get blasted and shouted at any day, as long as I hear the vehicle behind slow down.
Had a classic the other day, car roared up behind me, on the local A road, blasted on his horn and roared past. I gave him the obligatory single fingered salute, whereupon he slammed on his brakes and stopped in the middle of the road. First thought, this could be interesting, I wonder if he's bigger than me, I'm 6' 4'! Went to ride up to drivers side, almost a
alongside when he accelerated away, coward?

Re: Close pass - by a driver who should have known better

28 June 2015 - 3:04pm
661-Pete wrote:Riding in primary on that road is certainly a possible option, but not for me. It's a rural stretch of A-road; I'm not as fast as some and only too aware that if I hold up following motorists more than necessary it will only lead to more aggression.
As far as drivers are concerned on a rural A road ALL cyclists are effectively stationary (even Wiggo only manaaged just over 30mph when he broke the hour record the other week). Indeed the faster you go the harder it is to overtake as you need a longer gap in oncoming traffic. By riding slower you are less of an obstruction.

If you ride to the left you are signalling to following drivers that you are happy to share the lane and inviting them to dive through the remaining space (which is effectively your argument when you are reluctant to delay dravers more than is nescessary). Don't then be surprised when drivers do exactly that. As far as I am concerned my safety is more imprortant than any fictional time saving might be possible by a driver overtaking as soon as they encounter me rather than waiting till it is safe and catching up with the rest of the traffic half a mile down the road.

Re: Close pass - by a driver who should have known better

28 June 2015 - 1:10pm
Riding in primary on that road is certainly a possible option, but not for me. It's a rural stretch of A-road; I'm not as fast as some and only too aware that if I hold up following motorists more than necessary it will only lead to more aggression. So I only go to primary where it's strictly necessary (e.g. at bollards). There's a village just beyond that point with 30mph and some tight bends - there I would take primary if necessary.

It was certainly Dutch plates, I'm assuming the car was LHD (although there's a car in our neighbourhood with French plates but RHD). My initial thoughts are, that ought to encourage the driver to leave more space for cyclists. After all, I've had plenty of practice driving on the continent, in both LHD and RHD cars. When in my own (RHD) car, I'm always conscious of the fact that I'm closer than normal to the cyclist I'm overtaking. Nevertheless I do try and give them as much room as I would when overtaking in the UK.

Clearly this doesn't work for everyone.

Re: Close pass - by a driver who should have known better

28 June 2015 - 11:16am
Alan Frame wrote:I often find left hookers pass closer as the driver thinks he can judge the extremities of the vehicle better.

+1. Often my experience also

Re: Close pass - by a driver who should have known better

28 June 2015 - 11:08am
I think we're back to the same problem as always.
If a driver sees a gap that s/he thinks the vehicle they're driving will fit through,some drivers will fit it through irrespective of other considerations.
For some it's the gap they're focusing on,the vulnerability of the cyclist isn't of concern,the passing/not being held up/not having to slowdown,etc,is the issue for them.
This is clearly bad and inconsiderate driving,with no room for error.
As a cyclist I try to minimise that situation by closing the gap and riding further into the carriageway when I deem it necessary,which stops the problem,it may need a strong nerve at times but my life is more important that their journey time.
What I find worse and mindless, is being passed closely when there is a huge gap with no need to pass closely,with no oncoming traffic or a wide roadway,etc,in such situations the safety zone I've created to my left by riding further out in the roadway comes in very handy,whereas in such situations if I were close to the curb I'd be left with nowhere to go.
In a world where all drivers care for vulnerable road users such tactics wouldn't need to be employed,however this is the UK where idiots who drive cars,etc,abound

Re: Close pass - by a driver who should have known better

28 June 2015 - 9:26am
Can't quite see if the vehicle is left hand drive, but I often find left hookers pass closer as the driver thinks he can judge the extremities of the vehicle better.

Re: Close pass - by a driver who should have known better

27 June 2015 - 11:10pm
British motorists living in Holland could well bring their cars over with them when visiting the old country.

Close pass - by a driver who should have known better

27 June 2015 - 10:46pm
I had this happen to me earlier this week. Fairly typical run-of-the-mill close overtake, close enough to be scary to me nonetheless (note that the offender is a BMW) - but look at the numberplate! (freeze frame at about 24s).

You'd have thought, a Dutch motorist, with myriads of cyclists all around him when on home territory, would be able to interact better with cyclists. Or had he perhaps not quite got the knack of driving on the 'wrong' side of the road?

Re: another cyclist killed by a lorry in London

27 June 2015 - 10:11pm
Pete Owens wrote:There are certainly design features of construction vehicles that are likely to make them more likely to crush people. They are higher with bigger heavier wheels so there is a greater chance of being dragged under and run over, rather than being pushed over to the side.

More crucially construction lorries are exempt in legislation from having side bars to prevent cyclists falling under the wheels. That is about to change in London in September when Crossrail standards will become mandatory for all HGVs in London.

Re: Please help!

27 June 2015 - 6:56pm
simple put on some ordinary pedals

Re: another cyclist killed by a lorry in London

27 June 2015 - 6:52pm
mostly based on stereotypes

Which is probably quite suitable as we are talking about the interaction between two groups rather than two specific individuals.

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