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Updated: 59 min 47 sec ago

Re: Problems I never knew needed solving

29 May 2015 - 12:10pm
My wife uses Specialized Bar Phat, which is a gel-like substance that goes under your handlebar tape. This reduces vibration from the road, also padded track mitts/gloves will reduced vibration.

Re: Problems I never knew needed solving

29 May 2015 - 10:35am
May just not be used to the road bike practice of choosing one's line on the road to avoid irregularities that you'd just plough a hybrid or MTB straight over.

Re: Problems I never knew needed solving

29 May 2015 - 8:46am
thelawnet wrote:And suddenly I have some insight into some of the cycling problems I had previously dismissed as non-issues - painful vibration through the handlebars on any surface other than perfectly smooth tarmac- looks like I need to buy some padded gloves; sore backside from the frame/saddle transmitting all the same road issues - need to get some padded shorts; lack of stability on slippery surfaces/cornering/going down hill - best buy myself a helmet; lack of appropriate shoes for the pedals.

The review for the bike insists that it is 'relaxed', 'comfortable' and that the 'frame and the fork do a good job of filtering out vibration and chatter from uneven roads.' I assume that all of these qualities are relative.

Apparently it's a practical choice - practical if you count the lack of possibility for mudguards, panniers, or even carrying a lock lest you compromise its 'every gram less costs a pound more' weight properties, and then fear of it getting nicked if you leave it out in public.

But maybe I will grow to love it, once I am appropriately shod, clad, and am used to the riding position.

It's hard to know if these are things which are specific to your bike or if you're just not used to how a road bike goes? I certainly don't get painful vibrations through the bars and usually ride without gloves (except when it's cold which is all the time recently).

Is your fork carbon? What tyres do you have? What pressures?

Of course the ride isn't going to be as forgiving as something with massive tyres, but it shouldn't be uncomfortably so.

Re: Problems I never knew needed solving

29 May 2015 - 6:39am
thelawnet wrote:foxyrider wrote:So the OP's new bike is different to his other bikes but it doesn't mean they are 'problems'.

Having every road bump transmitted to my hands and backside is definitely a problem.
I expect that some wider tyres; the widest you can fit will help. I use Conti 4 seasons. Although I have Marathons on some other bikes, I find them a bit stiff in the narrower sizes. IMO the performance of the Conti 4 seasons justify the cost, but I know that not everyone agrees with me. Have a poke around on the 'tyre recommendation' threads on the forum for something a little easier riding than Marathons.

Other things you can try:
different, or double tape on the handle bars
suspension seat post
gel saddle

Other people manage to make such bikes comfortable for long distances, so it should be possible for everyone, or nearly everyone who wnats to ride one.

Re: Problems I never knew needed solving

29 May 2015 - 4:30am
The fastest average speed I ever got was on a 1960s steel touring bike with down tube shifters, I swear those bikes somehow just "go faster" over modern bikes.

I think a lot of new cyclists ride MTB's around on the road, but switching to 700c was the best thing I did. I do miss the full suspension though and wish there was some sort of FS road bike, if I dare say that. Maybe a high end (in other words carbon) FS MTB that has 29 inch wheels and has disc brakes is on a par with that.

That would be the perfect bike to me, a MTB thats full suspension, carbon, with 700c wheels and disc brakes, with 25/28 tyres with a light tread (M+ would do), with road triple chainrings and flat bars. If it had 32h or 36h wheels there isn't really anywhere you couldn't go on such a bike. You could hammer it around trails on it but it would be on a par with a road bike on the road (if you ducked right down lol). It could be made even better with a Rohloff hub on it, one day.

All I care about is reliability, durability, performance and comfort, not necessarily in that order. What I don't care about and never will is "going faster" or racing, or having lightweight stuff thats going to wear out in two years, or as some call years... "seasons".

Re: Is a cadence sensor worth it?

29 May 2015 - 12:22am
Fitted the computer yesterday. Haven't fitted the cadence sensor yet though.

The good news is that the LED bike light doesn't interfere with the wireless transmission. The bad news is that the heart rate monitor doesn't seem to update properly - it sometimes changes and other times will stay at the same rate despite me changing the amount of effort. Tested it whilst sat at my desk today at work and the readout will suddenly freeze. I suffer from something called ectopic beats and the display would freeze after one of these beats. I can't believe that this is the problem, but I'll keep monitoring (pardon the pun) it.

Re: Crane River Parks Hounslow & other London rides

28 May 2015 - 10:45pm
Here is a pdf file that shows quite clearly the west edge of the "circuit" that PRL refers to - the well looked after section and also the way to get to the Hounslow Heath section via the Cavalry tunnel - the path on the right near the "Feltham Circles" north west of the crematorium gardens.

http://www.richmond.gov.uk/crane_park_to_hounslow_heath_leaflet.pdf

click to enlarge pictures

The nice gravel path on the south side of the Circuit of the looked after section.JPG

a fellow traveller that hitched a ride.JPG

Re: Is a cadence sensor worth it?

28 May 2015 - 10:45pm
Only slightly off topic but before the days of cycle computers checking cadence involved a watch and counting.

On an 84" fixed 25mph is 100rpm. Riding a 25 mile time trial with an Ingersoll stopwatch on the handlebars I used to count the revs, aiming to reach 100 before the second hand got back to 12 o'clock. This gave an immediate indication of whether I was inside or outside the magic hour at every point in the ride. Sadly it was usually bad news but occasionally exhilarating.

Re: Is a cadence sensor worth it?

28 May 2015 - 7:44pm
I've no idea Mark. Probably to allow non cycling fit people to achieve it easily?

Re: Is a cadence sensor worth it?

28 May 2015 - 7:39pm
It's not quite true though, a cadence of 400 wouldn't be high power.

There is an optimum range, and it will be a bit different for each of us. MickF's range is lower than some others, but that's fine.

Personally I work best at 90-100 rpm, so what - we're not clones...

Re: Is a cadence sensor worth it?

28 May 2015 - 5:40pm
NATURAL ANKLING wrote:Hi,
Low cadence low power.
High cadence more power.

viewtopic.php?f=1&t=66742#p569959

A good rule of thumb.

I zip past many people on road bikes as they pedal in high gears at low cadence.

My road bikes are fitted with 42/32/22 MTB chainsets and I spin away in a comfortable gear all the time. To keep a decent, efficient cadence on a traditional road chainset you have to be very fit indeed, and probably young too.

I don't think cadence sensors are that useful. Once you realise that straining laboriously at high gears is inefficient and slow it is easy to find a comfortable and efficient cadence for yourself.

Re: Ian Austin MP - Couldn't make it up

28 May 2015 - 4:48pm
Flinders wrote:I have no idea why politicians tweet. You need to be far cleverer than most MPs are to be accurate, not to be misleading, and not to make an idiot out of yourself, when you have so few words.

Blaise Pascal wrote:I made this [letter] very long, because I did not have the leisure to make it shorter.

It's very hard to write anything meaningful in 140 charac

Re: Police Had Pulled Over a Driver

28 May 2015 - 1:20pm
eileithyia wrote:1. 'Out of town' registration in one of Coventry's less selubrious areas... I'm a bit puzzled by that. In the UK car registrations stay with the car, whatever part of the country it's been moved to (this is not the case in many other countries, where if you move into a different area you have to get the number plates changed). And the big car dealers ship used cars all over the country. My present car has a number plate beginning with 'N' which is the code for north-east England, even though I live in Sussex and bought it locally.

Re: Is a cadence sensor worth it?

28 May 2015 - 12:45pm
No, I can't run any distance at all. Tires me out!
Put me on a bike, and I can ride all day up and down the Cornish hills. Show me any of the joggers we see round here and I bet they couldn't even ride a bike up Gunnislake Hill.

Re: Ian Austin MP - Couldn't make it up

28 May 2015 - 11:44am
Flinders wrote:I have no idea why politicians tweet. You need to be far cleverer than most MPs are to be accurate, not to be misleading, and not to make an idiot out of yourself, when you have so few words.
I think with politicians on Twitter its a question of "when" rather than "if". Even "our Dave" LOL

Ian

Re: Ian Austin MP - Couldn't make it up

28 May 2015 - 10:13am
TonyR that tube map with walking times is excellent. It shows the non linear distances but also demonstrates just how close many in zone 1 are to each other.... if you make the time it'd be worth the savings I'd imagine. The tube map is an excellent design to incorporate a number representing walk time on each sector would be easy ( but not in interests of TFL I suppose ), fortunately it's rare I have to use it as I'm up north. My visits were to the motor show a few times in the late eighties and more recently regular trips to imperial college. To have so many interesting places on your doorstep must be good and the UK's big events tend to be london centric but I know when driving back from various places in the south east when I saw the sign on the A1 "Doncaster, The North" It was a nice feeling.... homeward bound away from the hubub.

Re: Police Had Pulled Over a Driver

28 May 2015 - 10:04am
I've been pulled over a few times;
1. 'Out of town' registration in one of Coventry's less selubrious areas... copper was quite rude, should have complained but never got round to it.
2. early morning in Oxford; had bikes in car and check to see we were not stealing them... fair enough (was going to National 100)
3. Tea time near the Velodrome in Manchester, again a check to see we were not stealing them
4. Quite late one night (ok probably early morning) driving down a back street in Kirby Stephens, Why was I parking there.... It was the advised place to park for the YHA and despite not having had a drink they insisted on breathylsing me... quite shocked me..... but at least it proved i was telling the truth.... warden later said they would never have pulled a local driver.
5. Twice recently there have been van checks locally; what are we carrying, Diesel check, etc., with customs, police, and other agencies all involved.

Re: Is a cadence sensor worth it?

28 May 2015 - 9:41am
nez dans le guidon wrote:I did a health appraisal thingy at work and they asked me to pedal a stationary bike at 55 rpm. I found it very difficult - my natural cadence is much higher (but what I dunno). The guy administering the test said regular cyclists found turning the cranks so slowly difficult.

Any reason why that cadence was chosen? Seems odd but I guess it depends what he was looking for.

I guess it's like some 'fitness tests' which have you running, which only tests running fitness, of which I have none.

Re: Dangerous Cycle Lane Surface When Wet ALERT NCN8

28 May 2015 - 9:37am
I could describe that situation very accurately in a few words, but they might be caught by a filter for rude language.

Those right angle turns onto pavements and off pavements, sometimes with ribbed sets which are hell to cross at a shallow angle, would only be useful if we could force those people designing then to use them in wet weather when A&E were short of business and we could all watch and have a good laugh.

Re: Ian Austin MP - Couldn't make it up

28 May 2015 - 9:33am
Tangled Metal wrote:Ppl need to get real. Man drives from one town to London and decides to sit in car during a protest that blocks roads for 2.5 hours rather than park up. Wow! Lock the guy up, castigate him on Twitter and forums. Give the guy a break.
So while sat in a car he's to Google carpark near his location then drive to it when the roads are in gridlock due to protest. Yes a load of car parks nearby, but if he didn't know where they were or get there then not helpful after the fact.
He cycles in London and elsewhere so I'm guessing he commutes that way when staying in London. Parking out of London then riding in sounds good but do you know what he was carrying? Could have boxes of paperwork, clothes for several weeks or other stuff that would not fit on a folding bike. Easy to suggest the folding bike without those facts about what he needed and was carrying in the car.

All this story seems to me as a good reason for MPs to not use Twitter. You post something as a lighthearted banter and because you are not face to face with the reader to clarify any offence or misunderstanding it triggers a backlash. I bet he wishes he'd not posted it. That was his only "crime" as far as I'm concerned. The backlash is just ridiculous MP bashing.
As he talked about signing up for uber, and specified an in-London distance, the original tweet clearly suggested that it was an in-London journey.
I have no idea why politicians tweet. You need to be far cleverer than most MPs are to be accurate, not to be misleading, and not to make an idiot out of yourself, when you have so few words.

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