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Updated: 25 min 17 sec ago

Re: Cyclists are treated as if they are staionary.

4 March 2015 - 4:06pm
Vorpal wrote:+1 Also, it often seems to me that drivers just assume that cyclists go 6 - 8 mph, independent of circumstances. And then there's the must. pass. cyclist I have sometimes been going at or near the speed limit, and still had drivers over take.

There's also the concept that drivers don't think of overtaking cyclists as actual overtaking. You used it in your own post 'pass' a cyclist, whereas I bet you would say 'overtake' for a car. Many drivers have the attitude that it's their right to breeze past cyclists quickly.

Re: Cyclists are treated as if they are staionary.

4 March 2015 - 4:04pm
The problem IMHO is that a good percentage of drivers don't think end of.
Further more they don't like being told how they've almost caused a incident,when I catch them up in the inevitable traffic jam at the next TL!
It's all so much man mind thyself that's the issue,a complete lack of courtesy for no gain,or at most a few seconds.

Re: Where to cycle on semi-narrow lanes?

4 March 2015 - 4:03pm
Not whacky at all...

Re: Route Help for Ealing (W5) to Slough (SL1)

4 March 2015 - 4:02pm
certainly not near year end

Re: Eastern European cyclist escorted off motorway

4 March 2015 - 3:30pm
A couple of years ago,was cycling along the SS113 (?) along north coast of Scicily. It was not a Motorway, but appeared to have been 'improved' in recent times compared with my map. Was suprised to find the local 'Gendarmarie' alongside waving me over. After some discussion (my Italian/their English not brilliant), they indicated to follow them. Mad dogs & Englishmen perhaps? Think they were just a bit concerned at lone cyclist on road with occasional large trucks.
We then proceeded to next junction with me sweating profusely with them behind, & headed up the slip road with several more vehicles trailing behind! At the roundabout, they pointed to the road to take. As I rounded the next corner, was confronted by a 'No Cyclist' sign!
Thoroughly enjoyed my tour of north & east Scicily!

Re: Eastern European cyclist escorted off motorway

4 March 2015 - 3:02pm
We don't help the situation by using the same colour for cycle routes and motorways.

"Cycling? Yes - just follow the blue signs..."

Re: Eastern European cyclist escorted off motorway

4 March 2015 - 2:57pm
When touring Andalusia a few years ago I was told to cycle part of my route on the motorway by a police officer, whom I approached for directions. She insisted there was no alternative route (aside from a super-long detour) and cycling on motorways was legal in Spain. It was a very busy road but the hard shoulder was wide so I thought it was a good idea... until the first junction. Next time I'll choose a detour.

Re: Eastern European cyclist escorted off motorway

4 March 2015 - 1:58pm
No, but in the UK yes. I stayed with my wife at a motel near Heathrow once, and the next morning we asked the woman at the desk the directions for the airport (cycling). We set off, reached a roundabout and finished up on a road with plenty of traffic but a completely unused lane on the left. And all the signs were white writing on a blue background! After a while we realised we were cycling up a hard shoulder, but we only had a short distance to go so we put the hammer down.

Re: Where to cycle on semi-narrow lanes?

4 March 2015 - 1:57pm
danhopgood wrote:I got caught the other morning on the tandem, with a long, straight, uphill, into wind approach to my son's school, where we have to turn right. Continuous parked cars both sides. Just room for two cars to pass at slow speed. Normally there's not a lot of traffic and we just keep a safe distance from doors, which means there's no issue with cars overtaking as long as there's nothing coming the other way.

That morning though someone stayed behind me unnecessarily for a long time, allowing other traffic to build up behind. When the lead car did overtake, those behind followed, with speeds increasing. I was near the right turn by this point but felt I shouldn't stop out in the road as I might get hit from behind, so waited for a gap, signalled right and went into primary. This resulted in an angry hoot - and I was a lot more worried I'd be hit.

Only thing I can think of to do in future would be to pull into any small gaps in cars and let the traffic past, but that in itself could be dodgy with cars behind. Any other ideas for the future in that situation?
It sounds okay to me. Do the 'lifesaver' (check again over your right shoulder) just before turning to ensure that angry hoot driver hasn't become impatient, endangering driver. I also sometimes have my kids turn at look at drivers behind us and signal for us. It works a treat, as they can turn around more easily. They are good about warning about cars behind, too, though if it is important, I always check for myself. With a child looking back, I seem to get less impatient treatment, the kids feel like they are helping, and it's good training for them for cycling independently.

Eastern European cyclist escorted off motorway

4 March 2015 - 1:49pm
M1 cyclist escorted off motorway in Hertfordshire

Any one ever done any thing like this abroad?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-beds-bucks-herts-31726226

Re: Bike

4 March 2015 - 1:42pm
In London streets I prefer to look out for discarded small change money on the road. Oxford st a good place where peole drop £1 coins.

Re: Bike

4 March 2015 - 1:28pm
Don't get the Beeb here, alas, but I've seen (and smelt) the result of a boar hunt. Hunters obligingly gutted a boar about 20 ft from an MTB control I once stopped at.

The beasts have reached pest status here, and hunting is now permitted all year round. Rather disquieting when you're riding tranquilly down a country road and you see the "Chasse" warning signs out: even more so when a troop of 20+ crosses the road like an express train 30 yards ahead.

Nice cycling in the Jura.

Re: Where to cycle on semi-narrow lanes?

4 March 2015 - 1:24pm
You did the right thing - the hoot is a good sign, it means they've seen and acknowledged your presence.

Re: Cyclists are treated as if they are staionary.

4 March 2015 - 12:54pm
danhopgood wrote:I think part of the problem is motorists aren't always good at assessing the speed of cyclists and do it partly based on what they look like, rather than how fast they're actually going.

+1 Also, it often seems to me that drivers just assume that cyclists go 6 - 8 mph, independent of circumstances. And then there's the must. pass. cyclist I have sometimes been going at or near the speed limit, and still had drivers over take.

Re: Where to cycle on semi-narrow lanes?

4 March 2015 - 12:38pm
I got caught the other morning on the tandem, with a long, straight, uphill, into wind approach to my son's school, where we have to turn right. Continuous parked cars both sides. Just room for two cars to pass at slow speed. Normally there's not a lot of traffic and we just keep a safe distance from doors, which means there's no issue with cars overtaking as long as there's nothing coming the other way.

That morning though someone stayed behind me unnecessarily for a long time, allowing other traffic to build up behind. When the lead car did overtake, those behind followed, with speeds increasing. I was near the right turn by this point but felt I shouldn't stop out in the road as I might get hit from behind, so waited for a gap, signalled right and went into primary. This resulted in an angry hoot - and I was a lot more worried I'd be hit.

Only thing I can think of to do in future would be to pull into any small gaps in cars and let the traffic past, but that in itself could be dodgy with cars behind. Any other ideas for the future in that situation?

Re: Cyclists are treated as if they are staionary.

4 March 2015 - 12:22pm
I think part of the problem is motorists aren't always good at assessing the speed of cyclists and do it partly based on what they look like, rather than how fast they're actually going.

Example, pretty girl in swirly dress on bike. Driver thinks - bound to be slow - and acts accordingly. She may be slow, but not always - could be Victoria G (nee P) going down hill with the wind behind her - definitely not slow. I then think there's a tendency for drivers to be embarrassed about backing out of a manoeuvre - they commit early and if they get it wrong, the cyclist suffers.

In their defence, many drivers don't ride bikes, so they don't always appreciate what difference a tail wind/hill/ pretty girl on bike to chase can make.

Re: Police appeal - attack on cyclists in Islington

4 March 2015 - 10:43am
mercalia wrote:that cctv is really shocking - that some one on the pavement could just leap at you and stab you.

Yes that's the worry,if someone treats another's life in such a way things are bad.
Though it's worth remembering that it's an isolated incident.
What I do find surprising is that if the attacker wanted the lad's bike he could've just knocked him of it and stolen it,as a result,the crime would have been theft,which wouldn't have attracted much attention from the police.
As it is,he's now wanted for murder and no stone will be left unturned to find him,quite apart from his stupidity,he must feel he's immune to prosecution,which for the rest of society is a worry in itself.

I don't want this to detract from the loss of a 15 year old boy who will now never realise his potential,and who's parents will now be devastated for the rest of their lives and,as happens so often in our society,all for one moment's madness.
It's truly,truly,sad and my heart goes out to his family and friends.

Re: Where to cycle on semi-narrow lanes?

4 March 2015 - 10:43am
A lane wide enough for two cars is wide enough for safe overtaking when a cyclist takes a default position suitably far from the gutter.

The issue is a lane about 1.5 car widths, where there is kind of enough space to put a stationary car and a pedal cycle, but certainly isn't enough room when the car is moving (a moving cyclist takes much less energy into any situation, and is therefore able to pass said stationary car safely).

At that point the primary position is required to prevent unsafe overtaking, and some motorists will decide that you are being needlessly obstructive. It is the oncoming traffic which is blocking their arrival at the next traffic jam, not the cyclist.

Re: Police appeal - attack on cyclists in Islington

4 March 2015 - 10:24am
I'm lucky enough to live in a place where crime levels are low, and violent crime almost unknown. It is easy to become complacent when a problem is not on your own doorstep. But while violent crime affects any part of our nation we must all stay focussed on reducing it. No citizen of the UK should fear walking to the corner shop after sunset.

Re: Bike

4 March 2015 - 10:18am
Audax67 wrote:...but I have noticed that after a boar hunt the roadside beer-can coefficient goes up by an order of magnitude. Not reassuring, considering the rifles they use.

Did you see Monica Galetti following a boar hunt on 'A Cook Abroad' the other day?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0 ... tis-france

She was clearly disturbed by the proceedings, but I suspect those she was with were on their best behaviour compared to the beer swilling hunters around your way. Guess I am not alone when hearing of the folk from the Jura region, which seems quite non-moderm, thinking 'Jurrasic'. But then, thinking about it, let me go look in Wikipeadia... Ah yes, named after the Jura mountains. Hmmm, so I am not so clever. (And I still post this, ha).

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