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Updated: 2 hours 15 min ago

Re: Ian Austin MP - Couldn't make it up

27 May 2015 - 11:39am
Rochester Row car park? NCP Victoria? Guildhouse Street? Park up and walk (you know it makes sense), it would be quite simple to have planned to do that. Better still, pack a folding bike, park further out and cycle in.

Re: Ian Austin MP - Couldn't make it up

27 May 2015 - 11:08am
Err.... steady on guys.

I just looked up the story on what may be a more trustworthy source: I can't vouch for it.

It seems this guy had driven down from the West Midlands that day, and it was just the last mile of his fairly long journey in which he got caught in a snarl-up. This sort of thing has happened to me oodles of times (usually on the M25 ) and I won't deny just how annoying it can be! I don't know why he didn't go all the way by train but he may have had good reasons.

He apparently responded to people who tweeted "why didn't you walk?" with the reply that he "couldn’t abandon his car on a London road." Seems reasonable to me. One extra parked car on the street would only make things worse!

I don't know what the black cabbies' dispute is about, but I can understand people feeling a grievance. I'm sure that on those occasions when I partook in a Critical Mass on our capital's streets, there were some folks about that would have been not wholly favourable to us cyclists. That's human nature! And I've had the odd 'moment' with a black cabbie myself....

Re: Roadcycling fimed whit pro drone in 4k definition

27 May 2015 - 10:44am
the next thing for racing cyclists with back side in the air - dont need to look ahead use a drone with camera floating just above as eyes?

Re: Ian Austin MP - Couldn't make it up

27 May 2015 - 10:39am
I think the chap who invents teleporting of MP's to a far distant planet, one way, is worthy of the billionaire club. If you go online to paliamentary expenses, even though they've curbed their excesses there is still a lot to question....regular first class train travel when 2nd would be fine etc. Though in Mr Austins case the taxi fare may be far lower than the expense claim for wear and tear of artisan crafted leather shoes.

On a side note to do with the distance, I think it was nicholas crane on his maps programme who pointed out to underground passengers how short the distance was between particular stations. It was just that people viewed the underground map ( as it has no defined linear scale ) and went station to station.

Re: Roadcycling fimed whit pro drone in 4k definition

27 May 2015 - 10:09am
hamster wrote:All pretty silly numbers marketing. 4K at 30fps is essentially SD for any moving content. If it moves by 4 pixels per frame then the motion blur will make the edges just as fuzzy. HD with 60Hz would look sharper.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wAlm1uazfQY

But the drone's camera angles are really fun and some amazing new shots to be had!

I can't have my life's work dismissed so casually

'4k at 30fps is essentially SD for any moving content' Mmm, well there is a lot going on here which needs to be looked at in order to explore this one. First of all, the constants are pixels and resolution, ie. how many. In other words resolution is the number of 'dots' can be squeezed in to a space. An A4 picture at x resolution will look sharper than an A3 picture at x resolution, so screen size plays a part too. SD, HD, 4k etc are not safely defined but generally accepted in the UK for television broadcasting as 576 interlaced for SD, 1080 interlaced for HD. So, a UK HD TV will have 2.07MP per frame, this is 5 times the resolution than SD. This is the definition.

Lets explore the frame rate now. 30 frames per second is the default US ATSC frame rate adopted due to the use of 30hz mains electricity. In the UK it is generally 25fps and in cinema 24fps. You mix up fps and hz but assuming you mean frame rate, does a faster frame rate give a sharper picture? Well, the human eye can detect frame rates higher than current TVs display, but not much more. Lets go back to our 35mm film cameras, if we want a really sharp image, we would try and get as fast a shutter speed as possible. This would lead to the iris opening wider which would reduce the depth of field. We would freeze the action whilst blurring everything else. It was a compromise which we utilised to get the image we wanted. The same with moving image cameras, the faster they record a frame, the sharper the image. So in this respect, you are correct, a faster camera gives a sharper image. But there are limitations, such as, light levels, lens performance, sensor (film) sensitivity.

So how has the film industry coped with these limitations over the last 120 years? They have maximised and controlled light, developed fast lenses and probably the single most important development, perfected mounts and tracking systems which move with the action, thus 'freezing' it within the frame.

The real issue is that the rest of us just want to film an activity with our GoPros but have no control over lighting and may not have access to tracking and panning equipment. They might be mounted on our helmets or handlebars. Of course the result is going to be less sharp, and to be honest, a frame rate of 300fps is only going to make the footage less watchable!

Are they silly numbers then, no. The numbers indicate to us what we can expect to achieve. For most broadcasters and film makers, that is an excellent watchable product.

Re: Ian Austin MP - Couldn't make it up

27 May 2015 - 10:07am
It gets better.

He turns out to have been in his car.

F

Re: Ian Austin MP - Couldn't make it up

27 May 2015 - 9:55am
ferdinand wrote:Yesterday PM from the Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Cycling Group:

"Taken 2.5 hours to get from Victoria to Westminster thanks to black cabs demo. How do I sign up for @Uber so I never have to use one again?"
https://twitter.com/IanAustinMP/status/ ... 5599025152

It is just over a mile, so about a 15 minute walk.



F

Isn't this the whole problem with modern UK society and transport?
People expect to want to go somewhere and just as if by magic be there.
The chap who invents teleporting will instantly be a multi billionaire....... ........whilst increasing the average body fat of the human race by X times and other associated health issues similarly.

Re: Ian Austin MP - Couldn't make it up

27 May 2015 - 9:29am
oh they are special people, they shouldnt have to rub shoulders with the (other) subhuman of the species, didnt u know that?

Re: Is a cadence sensor worth it?

27 May 2015 - 9:17am
I think anyone who can undertake giant journeys on a 1970s chopper Mick is the stuff of legend and would have to be a statistical outlier!

Ian Austin MP - Couldn't make it up

27 May 2015 - 9:02am
Yesterday PM from the Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Cycling Group:

"Taken 2.5 hours to get from Victoria to Westminster thanks to black cabs demo. How do I sign up for @Uber so I never have to use one again?"
https://twitter.com/IanAustinMP/status/ ... 5599025152

It is just over a mile, so about a 15 minute walk.



F

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

27 May 2015 - 8:46am
admin wrote:As an update, we've now been walking to school instead of cycling for some weeks now. The difference is amazing: almost stress-free school journeys! It takes me 40 minutes to get to and from school, compared to 20 minutes on the bike, but it's so much more pleasant. There's no way I'd ever recommend anyone to cycle to school now. Walk, or go by car, I say.
Glad that you've got it sorted. Once you realise that you have to set aside that extra time, it gets second nature. Also, you probably had an extra five minutes at home getting the bikes out, locking the bikes at school, etc.

Keep it up with the kiddies doing the other leisure cycling.

Re: Is a cadence sensor worth it?

27 May 2015 - 8:01am
He's not tested me then!

Out the other day along the riverside road down in the Bere Peninsula, there's a long level bit along the River Tamar. Very pretty area - sea birds, wild flowers, boats etc.

Along there, I always take my time circa 7 or 8 mph, but in top gear 115". Very very relaxing to ride slowly on the level in a very high gear.

Cadence?

24rpm.

Re: Problems I never knew needed solving

27 May 2015 - 1:30am
kwackers wrote:I had a lightweight carbon framed bike for a while and whilst it was a revelation in what it meant to ride a bike that weighed nothing it did demonstrate comfort was a relative thing.

I simply rode it less and less until one day I brushed the cobwebs off and sold it.

Nothing beats a steel framed tourer (imo).


I agree for touring, winter and town work. But I also run two steel framed road bikes on country lanes in the summer.

My 1999 531c Bob Jackson is a dream on 23mm tyres. It comes out of hibernation every spring like the Blue Peter tortoise and it feels as if I've just got a brand new fast bike.

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

27 May 2015 - 12:28am
walk or go by car........ thats a shame that you've defaulted to that choice. I think if you were to ask 100 parents the schools, for example, 1.5mls away is it walk or car? I hedge my bets 90 would pick up the car keys. So I think to say walk or go by car will sustain the excess of short distance car journeys, hence pollution, high traffic volumes and obese children/parents. My experiences in the area I live are that people will drive less than half a mile without any thought of walking it, I'm seen as odd as I walk 2mls to the nearest bus stop. I still drive a car, simply try to balance its use, to me 1-2mls would be walk, that also as a kid when I walked to school. I think I must be well out of touch with the modern attitude to life, quite worrying. The idea of say dutch style cycle provision is ideal but I think we all know that no party that would typically be elected in the UK would have such a policy for infrastructure.... the one party that may, the greens, sadly just can't attract the majority and are disadvantaged by our voting system.

So from your experience should we not really be putting the emphasis on walking, together perhaps with public transport in urban areas( rural quite poorly served ) in lieu of the car, also school buses. For those wanting to cycle the roads would then be quieter if others chose those options.

Re: Crane River Parks Hounslow & other London rides

26 May 2015 - 11:59pm
elPedro666 wrote:Thanks for the update [emoji3] we've just got back from exploring some similar waterside hidden gems around Stockport; very satisfying to get intimate with the nooks and crannies of your local area [emoji6]


Yes u dont need to go abroad to find places to explore, some can be very close, many need a bit of time that u probably cannt afford when traveling abroad or some distance from a base.

click pics to enlarge

here a few more - these from Staines Road section - so called Donkey Wood -

across small open grassy spaces.JPG

Donkey Wood raised walkway.JPG

Donkey Wood here is why.JPG

not always swampy but this day was wet.JPG

Donkey Wood.JPG

Re: Butser Hill - proposed cyclepath for the missing link

26 May 2015 - 10:04pm
We've got one of those alongside the A1076 Gayton Road in Gaywood, Norfolk. It's unpopular and many people on bikes still use the carriageway. Have Hampshire really got enough income to waste building horrible things? Give them a week and go to the local press - if it's linked to either Archant or Johnson Press, I expect they can find the occasional "why don't they use the cycle track?" / "because it's awful" exchanges in the EDP or Lynn News letters pages.

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

26 May 2015 - 9:28pm
ferdinand wrote:I'm still reflecting on cycle paths, but I think we need both Major and Minor versions

No, please no!

We don't need "cycle paths", they've been tried and have failed terribly. You just end up with footway conversions, which are narrow, not safe, give away priority at every side road, and annoy pedestrians.

We simply need what the Dutch have (and to a certain extent also the Danes). We need cycleways - ways that are designed for bicycles to use, just as carriageways are designed for motor carriages. Dutch-style cycleways are good enough for all cyclists, from children aged 8 cycling on their own to school, all the way to teams of racing cyclists passing through. It's not difficult, although it does need some careful attention to detail and a strong commitment to build them. But, once built, the entire population can make use of them, leading to better health, less congestion, less pollution, less danger, better community interaction, etc, etc.

As an update, we've now been walking to school instead of cycling for some weeks now. The difference is amazing: almost stress-free school journeys! It takes me 40 minutes to get to and from school, compared to 20 minutes on the bike, but it's so much more pleasant. There's no way I'd ever recommend anyone to cycle to school now. Walk, or go by car, I say.

Re: Is a cadence sensor worth it?

26 May 2015 - 9:13pm
I did a health appraisal thingy at work and they asked me to pedal a stationary bike at 55 rpm. I found it very difficult - my natural cadence is much higher (but what I dunno). The guy administering the test said regular cyclists found turning the cranks so slowly difficult.

Re: Is a cadence sensor worth it?

26 May 2015 - 8:50pm
Swear by them. Multiple knee surgeries (both knees), need a good cadence. Use mine most when training and racing (Tris/TTs). Ideal cadence at threshold Heart Rate (from my HRM) = best I can do...

My "natural" cadence is 93rpm. No idea why, that's where it feels right.

I use a cateye astrale to measure mine with rear wheel speed / distance sensor and cadence. I have 3 of them across the bikes (don;t have one on the MTB...) they're all 20+ years old. One has a cracked screen and leaks water from a crash many years ago - cling film wrap cures it and allows perfect visibility.

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