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Updated: 1 hour 54 min ago

Re: Cycling lesson please

5 January 2015 - 9:19pm
If I was cycling that bit of road I would take the lane and not let them pass and not be intimidated off the road by beeping.

However that is not how I want to spend my life and if at all possible I would find somewhere else to cycle. I have some stretches that I dont like but I sometimes have to travel on. I dont really have a reluctance while doing it but I do find myself increasingly taking a very long diversion, or the car, rather than set off that way on the bike to begin with.

I do find that you get quite used to anything and less affected by it if doing it regularly.

Re: Cycling lesson please

5 January 2015 - 9:06pm
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cq3hSRRPHfs

possibly some tips to follow

Re: Cycling lesson please

5 January 2015 - 8:15pm
The trick to do when somebody beeps at you from behind is wobble.
You may want to look back at the same time but the important thing is the wobble.
If car drivers think you are a novice then they give you more room because they don't want you to fall off in front of them and damage their car.

The daft thing is it works ......

Re: Cycling 'Too Dangerous' for Australian PM

5 January 2015 - 7:34pm
Slightly OT

This was picked up by the back page section of New Scientist many years ago and given the name "nominative determinism" much more catchy than the original "aptronym"

There were some wonderful examples:

Re: The Dangers of Road Debris

5 January 2015 - 7:01pm
Tonyf33 wrote:I'm 45 so I'm no fuddy duddy and basic stuff like looking/interpreting hazards and taking avoiding action like this is kids stuff, something I taught my son at 10 and held him in good stead when he eventually took his car driving test at 18 & passed his HGV licence at the first attempt after 2 weeks tuition.

This is a group of adults, not some 10/11/12 year olds on their first outing on the roads, the one who had the crash apparently had (according to a poster above) being cycling for 30 years, yet he and his group show ZERO understanding of hazards and ride through causing the crash..stupid stupid stupid.
Or what they could have done instead, see the hazard, ease off a bit whilst doing a simple over the shoulder check to ensure they can move out into what was clearly already a very quiet road, go around the debris and move back into the lane. That's not rocket science..

If they can't even figure out something as basic as that then god knows how they deal with multiple hazards in and around towns/cities, they are a danger to themselves (as shown) and are likely a danger to others as well.
If that is too difficult to grasp for posters on here then I suggest some of you start to learn roadcraft and do a hazard perception 'crash' course asap..jesus wept
Tony please just calm down you've no need to get so irritated about this given you have quoted some stats here's mine.
I will be 64 in March at the age of 9 - 10 passed my cycling proficiency test. At the age of 16 my motorbike test currently ride a BMW 1200GS, not like a 16 year old and I am still learning. Aed 17 passed my car test. Aged 21 passed my Class 2 HGV which meant I could drive everything but artics. Aged 25 passed my Class 1 test which meant I could then drive all heavy goods vehicles but still really only drove class 2 vehicles really. Oh and I later on did a tanker conversion driver course with Smith and Robinson in Rothwell. All these were one week courses so your son was lucky to have two weeks.
So I don't need you to lecture me about road craft.
The common denominator with all these courses is that to pass them especially the HGV ones is that I always had to keep a cool head to pass them something you do not seem to have the ability to do.
Why in my earlier thread I said I thought your comments were harsh is that I can get no joy from someone hurting themselves from what was clearly a mistake on the part of the rider. What's also interesting is that when I was your age 45 and perhaps up to the age of 50 when I was out on my motorbike if someone passed me and I thought that they were racing me I would get the red mist come over and I would set off in pursuit. How daft was that but it happened.
Now at my age I am probably like beardy and I take great delight in just getting my bike around the corner bend correctly at the speed limit.
As I said before we all do stupid things just like this cyclist. For the record I too get miffed when I either see the local racing cyclists out on their training runs riding at speeds that make it difficult for cars to pass them safely but as I also said I would get no joy from seeing any of them injure themselves.

Re: Cycling lesson please

5 January 2015 - 6:53pm
lol thatd be 100% in my case...since I complained about one of their own they dont seem to like me anymore....im gutted
but it also means no polite jacket for me

Re: 10,000 miles in a year finally

5 January 2015 - 6:27pm
Thankyou.
Yes, I'm back on the merry go round!

Re: 10,000 miles in a year finally

5 January 2015 - 5:50pm
pedalsheep wrote:10,514

I somehow missed this post
Well done,it all starts again now,or did do 5 days ago

Re: Three! more cyclists killed

5 January 2015 - 3:28pm
thirdcrank wrote:If somebody really wants your car, they won't be too bothered about waiting until you are getting in or out and then taking it, using whatever personal violence they find necessary to accomplish their purpose. Plenty of cars are easier to steal than that so it's not often "necessary."
This is why when my neighbour suffered a break-in to steal his car-keys while he was in the house, the door being physically broken to enter, he was pleased that the keys were relatively easy for the thieves to find, rather than them entering further into the house and encountering its occupants. He was less impressed by the technicality the insurance company used to avoid paying out, which had nothing to do with any such detail.

Re: Three! more cyclists killed

5 January 2015 - 2:54pm
If a car has a PIN keyboard, they break in and damage it, let you do an emergency bypass repair and then nick it later on.

Re: The Dangers of Road Debris

5 January 2015 - 2:52pm
I did Roadcraft thirty years ago, along with the IAM test. Then I did decades as a courier on motorcycles and later vans. Zero cycle crashes so far.
Just because somebody sees different angles and makes different choices doesnt mean they are a "newby" or incompetent. It may be they have actually learnt more than you.
One thing that I do know for sure, from road experience is that things dont turn out the same each time you make the same decision and that text book answers are best left for keyboard experts.

The difference here is that people are pontificating from a computer keyboard with the benefit of hindsight, making it oh so easy to be arrogant and correct when not being put to a real life test (without being given the answers in advance as is the case here.)

Re: The Dangers of Road Debris

5 January 2015 - 2:28pm
I'm 45 so I'm no fuddy duddy and basic stuff like looking/interpreting hazards and taking avoiding action like this is kids stuff, something I taught my son at 10 and held him in good stead when he eventually took his car driving test at 18 & passed his HGV licence at the first attempt after 2 weeks tuition.

This is a group of adults, not some 10/11/12 year olds on their first outing on the roads, the one who had the crash apparently had (according to a poster above) being cycling for 30 years, yet he and his group show ZERO understanding of hazards and ride through causing the crash..stupid stupid stupid.
Or what they could have done instead, see the hazard, ease off a bit whilst doing a simple over the shoulder check to ensure they can move out into what was clearly already a very quiet road, go around the debris and move back into the lane. That's not rocket science..

If they can't even figure out something as basic as that then god knows how they deal with multiple hazards in and around towns/cities, they are a danger to themselves (as shown) and are likely a danger to others as well.
If that is too difficult to grasp for posters on here then I suggest some of you start to learn roadcraft and do a hazard perception 'crash' course asap..jesus wept

Re: Cycling 'Too Dangerous' for Australian PM

5 January 2015 - 1:31pm
As for Abbott & That Ilk - well I've long thought that Oz and NZ are a 'lost cause' as far as promotion of cycling is concerned - I'm hoping someone will come in and prove me wrong! But it reminds me of an (American) former MD of mine at work, who was bothered (me being apparently 'unreplaceable' or something) about me cycling the meagre 2 miles to the workplace. He dropped hints that he'd prefer me to sport a suit-of-armour or whatnot. Don't get me wrong: he was an excellent manager and I got on well with him. But as far as his attitude to cycling was concerned, he was a total prat.

Re: The Dangers of Road Debris

5 January 2015 - 1:27pm
Tonyf33 wrote:hondated wrote:Tonyf33 wrote:Bloody newbs, seriously what a douche, how the hell can you not see those VERY large sticks and why oh why were they riding in the gutter in the first place? The carriageway clearly is demarked by the solid white line, why the heck would you ride in the trash section, just asking for trouble.
Stupid is as stupid does springs to mind..
Oh come on Tony that finally comment is a bit harsh.Haven't we all done silly things.

I don't put my head down when in a group on what was clearly a fast section of downhill road, I don't jump from the carriageway to the gutter (& back again), never mind to do it without over the shoulder or under the arm checks, I keep my eyes open for hazards not jerking about like this bunch of idiots. They brought this on themselves by their own actions/inactions, the debris is relatively minor, it's a few large objects that could have easily being avoided even at speed but because they don't have either the riding skills nor the intelligence to figure out risk & hazard perception & why the crash happened they'll carry on making the same stupid errors. My phrase is wholly appropriate IMO.
Arrh the beauty of getting old and with it acquiring some wisdom !

Re: Cycling 'Too Dangerous' for Australian PM

5 January 2015 - 1:22pm
mercalia wrote:I used to know a guy at school whose surname was
Coffin
IIRC, "Peter Coffin" was the name of a character in Moby Dick - not a doctor at least. Mind you, there are lots of weird names in that book.

Neilo wrote:I once met a guy whos surname was Citcat, pronounced Kit-Kat, I had to try very hard not to laugh.
The much-publicised leader of the Green-led Brighton and Hove Council is called Jason Kitcat, yes he too apparently got a lot of stick at school (and is still getting it now).

Re: Three! more cyclists killed

5 January 2015 - 1:08pm
My previous car (Peugeot 306) had a PIN pad for security. Do any other models have this? I liked to believe that this was a near-foolproof anti-TWOC device (wouldn't stop someone breaking in, but at least stop them driving away even with the key).

The main nuisance was, whenever I took the car in for its MOT or service, I either had to tell the garage the PIN, or enter a special temporary 'service' code - and remember to cancel it afterwards.

It seems almost criminal that car makers allow their products to be so easily stolen. After all, a motor vehicle (in the wrong hands) is the closest to a killing machine that most of us will get. Would you leave a loaded gun visible on your front porch?

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