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Updated: 2 hours 6 min ago

fell walking vs cycling

3 July 2014 - 6:17pm
I did the Tourmalet 3 weeks ago, and last week went fell walking up Blencathra via Bannerdale crags and Sharp Edge in the Lakes, about 8.5 miles and a lot of ascending.
I noticed that I seemed to be breathing a lot harder when walking uphill than on the bike, but also that moving the legs didn't seem an effort, whereas on the Tourmalet I was aware of making effort on pedal strokes. Walking uphill felt less challenging and being able to see the summit a long way off wasn't disheartening. I also noticed that though although we were out for 6 hours a sandwich, energy bar and crisps seemed enough food. I'd worry on the bike if I hadn't more than that in six hours.
I was a bit surprised to find that I had some aching at just the top of my thighs at the end of the walk, but the big difference was how unrecovered I felt the next day after the walk, I really wouldn't have wanted to do another. I think that is probably due to biking being low impact whereas walking puts more stress on your body and shakes up your internal organs. Unless "For Goodness Shakes" which I used after biking is a miracle recovery drink.

Re: Tesco delivery van driver

3 July 2014 - 4:51pm
Nice to see a 'good driver' thread – perhaps this can be a regular cheering up feature .
There's a long downhill stretch on a busy B road in a 20mph zone which I always dread – I usually get numerous close overtakes as drivers break the speed limit to beat me to each traffic island. Coming home last night, a kind person hung back all the way and refrained from tailgating when I slowed to turn off – thank you .

Re: Tesco delivery van driver

3 July 2014 - 3:05pm
Psamathe wrote:A few weeks ago I was given really good clearance (unexpected) by a CTS Buildbase lorry. And I then needed to order loads of sand, ballast and cement (7 big square bags and a palette of cement) so I used that builders merchant and told them about the good driving their delivery driver had (incl. the vehicle) and hence my selection of supplier. And word got around the company and when delivered the driver knew I had praised his driving (same driver delivered my stuff).

I always try to give both good and bad feedback - as I believe the good feedback can be as effective (or more effective) than complaints.

Ian

Well said.

Re: Tesco delivery van driver

3 July 2014 - 12:15pm
A few weeks ago I was given really good clearance (unexpected) by a CTS Buildbase lorry. And I then needed to order loads of sand, ballast and cement (7 big square bags and a palette of cement) so I used that builders merchant and told them about the good driving their delivery driver had (incl. the vehicle) and hence my selection of supplier. And word got around the company and when delivered the driver knew I had praised his driving (same driver delivered my stuff).

I always try to give both good and bad feedback - as I believe the good feedback can be as effective (or more effective) than complaints.

Ian

Re: Tesco delivery van driver

3 July 2014 - 12:06pm
661-Pete wrote:Just goes to show: the courtesy I experience from other road users far outweighs the abuse. It seems, and I hope, it's the same for others.

Excuse me, got to pop out and do some shopping....

....at Tesco's .

I'm with Pete on this one, I just don't get abuse from drivers. It may happen one day, but it ain't happened yet.

i reckon history will show (in a short time too) that this is a transition period where we become more used to cycles on the road as their number increases. Being less unusual, they will be more accepted. Compare us to Europe, where the higher costs of car insurance suggests the driving is more risky, they are nonetheless accustomed to and accepting of cyclists in a way many of our folk are not. Its very likely that before long we too will be treating cyclists in a much better way as they become more numerous.

Re: Tesco delivery van driver

3 July 2014 - 9:58am
This is the less obvious half of "safety in numbers", not only that more cyclists, on their bikes, mean that motorists have to act accordingly but also that more motorists, in their motors, know what it is like to be on a bike.

Re: Tesco delivery van driver

3 July 2014 - 9:16am
Hmmm, my experience of those guys is that they are always on the phone..

Al

Re: Tesco delivery van driver

3 July 2014 - 8:47am
Just goes to show: the courtesy I experience from other road users far outweighs the abuse. It seems, and I hope, it's the same for others.

Excuse me, got to pop out and do some shopping....

....at Tesco's .

Re: Tesco delivery van driver

3 July 2014 - 7:09am
One of our local Sainburys delivery drivers is a keen cyclist and we often manage to compare notes when he's dropping off our weekly shop. I wonder which will be the first major supermarket to switch to pedal power for deliveries?

Re: Tesco delivery van driver

3 July 2014 - 5:53am
Someone has to say it...

Every little helps!

Re: collecting my new bike

2 July 2014 - 11:28pm
foxyrider wrote:It is a requirement on Cycle Schemes that everything be processed together - we do hundreds of them! However there is no requirement for you to take everything from the store in one go.

A work colleague had this issue last year with his C2W LoC. He went for a £700 bike but when it was time to process the LoC the bike had dropped down to £500 so had to 'spend' the balance on lights, computer and mudguards.

My C2W bike has changed again today but when I placed the original order I asked for mudguards and rack to be fitted by the shop. I'm capable of doing it myself but prefer the shop to do it.

Re: Tesco delivery van driver

2 July 2014 - 11:24pm
Not everyone is bad.

Tesco delivery van driver

2 July 2014 - 10:56pm
Coming home from town this afternoon, I needed to change to the right-hand filter lane. I signalled and moved into what I thought was a large enough gap in front of a van. It then switched to the inner lane and pulled up on my left as we both stopped for the traffic lights. The window opened and I braced myself for some abuse even though I reckoned my manoeuvre had been all right. Conversation goes like this:

Him: "Keeping fit, then?"

Me: "Trying to - it's hard work in this wind."

Him: "I know - I like riding my bike but I've got a bad back at the moment and can't go very far."

Me: "Ah, that's bad luck"

Him, as his light changes to green and he drives off: "Have a nice day!"



I thought I'd post as an alternative to the bad experiences.

Re: Nightmare drive

2 July 2014 - 9:05pm
[XAP]Bob wrote:
Why not have them both "one way" for motor vehicles?



Ha ha, a highlands gyratory!

Re: Nightmare drive

2 July 2014 - 9:00pm
Mark1978 wrote:I wonder if you're cycling it would be quicker to go around via the coast route? Not that you would want to mind as where's the fun in that!

Actually the coast route is far more enjoyable than the the pass. The coast route is quieter had a quite a few climbs followed by some long sweeping descents. In fact it is far more fun than playing dodgems with vans and cars on the pass.

And if you are not time trialing the views around the coast are fabulous.

Re: Cycling on single-track roads

2 July 2014 - 8:27pm
Sorry, not read all through this thread.

Single track roads?
Good grief, Devon and Cornwall are littered with them, in fact we live on one.

Life is like that round here. Give and take with cars lorries busses and cyclists, let alone pedestrians.

Just two segments of the area.
https://maps.google.co.uk/maps?q=gunnis ... 1,,0,-5.71

https://maps.google.co.uk/maps?q=gunnis ... 2,,0,20.16

Re: Nightmare drive

2 July 2014 - 8:11pm
On the subject of reversing uphill for a lower gear, my dear old dad told me that this used to be a regular tactic for getting up Sutton Bank (A class road with stretches of 25%.) There are relatively sharp bends on Sutton Bank so you might have thought that any benefit from a lower gear in reverse would be cancelled out by the difficulty of steering. Even with the modern vehicles of the 21C, there are plenty of problems. There are big signs on the approach road noting the total of HGV's which have got stuck during the last year. Caravans are banned up and down, but when I was driving up there a few weeks ago, there was a large caravan parked on a layby in the bit covered by the ban. The towing vehicle was a Renault Kangoo so you have to query what some drivers have in the space between their ears.

Re: Cycling on single-track roads

2 July 2014 - 8:08pm
On Forge Road, Eridge, (East Sussex) which is part of route 21, and connecting roads, I have found that the majority of ?local? motorists are exceptionally courteous. On this hill for example http://goo.gl/maps/UvAEU I've had Range Rovers, utility vans and cars pull right up on the bank and wait for me to climb (slowly) uphill past them. Of course if I'm at the top about to go down and a motor vehicle is coming up the hill I wait. Similarly on the flatter part of the road, there seems to be a mutual respect between me as a cyclist and many vehicle drivers as regards passing and overtaking places with acknowledgements by both parties. I don't know if the route 21 repeater signs have any effect that motorists should expect cyclists to be on this route.

Anyone else use this route with similar experience?

Re: Nightmare drive

2 July 2014 - 7:50pm
brynpoeth wrote:I heard the one about vehicles having to reverse up a steep hill (Arthog hill) because the reverse gear is the lowest. Is it true, does anyone from back then know?

I don't know about the lowest gear, but I do know that my uncle Billy's prewar (very!) car had the petrol tank mounted on the bulkhead above the engine, with a gravity feed from the front down to the carburetter. If the fuel level was low, and the hill was long and very steep, the carb would run dry and it was necessary to turn round and reverse up hill to refill it

Re: Nightmare drive

2 July 2014 - 6:23pm
Mark1978 wrote:But I think for the most part apart from the OP breaking his clutch it isn't a particular problem, traffic levels are relatively low and the road copes.
+1 There really isn't a problem on this road, so long as road users are a little bit competent and considerate.

BTW, the coast road has had a bit of a bad press on this thread. In fact, it's a great road by most standards, with marvellous sea views, mainly two lanes, and plenty of short, steep climbs to test the unwary cyclist, complacent after having climbed the Bealach na Ba.

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