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Updated: 1 hour 17 min ago

Re: Cyclist dies on Surrey 100

13 August 2014 - 9:45am
It does, s**t sadly happens.

There is no real solution.

I am in the lucky 5% to have survived one so it is an issue very close to me.

Until it happens quite often there is nothing that would indicate it would.

Prior to mine, I always had a very good set of stats, blood pressure, heart function and resting heart rate. I was in good shape and there were no indications of what was to happen.

This goes for countless cases of this, seemingly fit healthy people keeling over out of the blue with no previous indications. Ironically a lot of super fit athletes, especially long distance ones are putting themselves at risk of atrial fibrillation. AF itself though is not immediately dangerous but can quickly degenerate to become something worse. All those aging willowy elite cyclists who boast of very low resting heart rates are particularly at risk but probably do not realise it. Probably one or two on here in fact.

The thing that gets me about this case though is the time it took to get a defib on the scene.

Re: Bonnet surfing

13 August 2014 - 8:50am
Postboxer wrote:I think most of the people on here would agree there needs to be more convictions for driving offences and that the penalties should be more severe.

For this sort of act, I'm all for bringing back public stoning.
I'm glad the lunatic got something though.

Re: Cyclist dies on Surrey 100

13 August 2014 - 6:55am
Colin_P wrote:Sudden Cardiac arrest.

I've suffered a few myself and am one of the lucky 5% to survive the first one.

It makes my mind boggle that on such a large sporting event they didn't seemingly have proper emergency medical facilities. For anything like this there should be an AED available or even several along the route. An AED is an Automatic External Defibrillator.

Kris Cook might well be alive today if those treating him had access to one.

Rest in peace Kris.

On a 100 mike route to be sure of having an AED (and people who know how to operate one) within life-saving distance of every rider could require an awful lot of them.

Sometimes [inappropriate word removed] happens.

Re: Cyclist dies on Surrey 100

13 August 2014 - 4:56am
Guess there are a few issues here; Unfit possibly overweight people suddenly taking up a bike, going for a ride ( I believe he was not particularly 'old'). How many times do you see the advice; seek medical advise before taking up exercise....
An underlying condition that led to the Arrest ( a neighbour died in marathon at 26 due to a cardiac condition and he was a regular marathon runner).
AED were probably available along the route as so many towns, villages, shopping centres etc do have them, but as said you probably need them every mile along the route plus someone to operate them.
When we do our resuscitation days at work, we are advised if someone arrests at the local shopping centre we are probably best leaving the trained operative to operate the AED because they have been trained to use that specific piece of kit, and are probably very eager to try out those skills....

CPR, death and time of death can be very different things. If someone has collapsed with an arrest and requires CPR then (as we are told on our resus days) they are already dead, you cannot do any more harm... (and why we are taught to recognise peri-arrest conditions and call help before the arrest occurs). Arrival of ambulance and transfer to hospital would mean continuation of CPR but time of death will only be when resus attempts are abandoned and a doctor officially declares the person is dead. Incidently my dad was already in the ambulance when he arrested and still did not survive his heart attack.... so speed of emergency services arrival may not have necessarily had a bearing on the outcome.

Given the numbers riding it is surprising there are not more such incidents in these events.

Condolences to family and those around who witnessed the event.

Re: Cyclist dies on Surrey 100

12 August 2014 - 10:54pm
Colin_P wrote:It took 45 minutes so I believe for an actual ambulance to get to him.

Seems like a bit too long.

An AED costs about £1500 and they should be scattered about all over the place. Hopefully they will become more popular in the near future.

His wife who was with him is reported as saying it took 20-30 mins. Given the conditions - Chris Boardman who was riding it described them as “went from torrential to biblical and then to just horrendous” - with flooded roads all over the place its not surprising the ambulance took some time to get there despite the proximity but those were very unusual conditions. It does appear though that there were medical staff from the organisers with him from pretty early on giving CPR and the delay was maybe not the cause of his death which was an hour and a half later at the hospital.

I'm also not sure how well an AED would have performed given that everything would have been soaking wet and high voltages don't generally mix well with water.

Donations now are up to almost £35k so some good will come of this and hopefully that will be of some comfort to his partner.

Re: Cyclist dies on Surrey 100

12 August 2014 - 10:07pm
It took 45 minutes so I believe for an actual ambulance to get to him.

Seems like a bit too long.

An AED costs about £1500 and they should be scattered about all over the place. Hopefully they will become more popular in the near future.

Re: Cyclist dies on Surrey 100

12 August 2014 - 9:27pm
Colin_P wrote:It makes my mind boggle that on such a large sporting event they didn't seemingly have proper emergency medical facilities. For anything like this there should be an AED available or even several along the route. An AED is an Automatic External Defibrillator.

Kris Cook might well be alive today if those treating him had access to one.

Rest in peace Kris.

How many would you need and how many people trained to use them? It was a 100 mile route so assuming a maximum allowable time to restore blood to the brain of 4 minutes and zero response time of getting the message out and AED moving you'd have to have one every four miles along the route or hope to get lucky in the location of any cardiac event. And that's assuming you could achieve 30mph response speed on country roads clogged with cyclists. In practice you'd probably need them at 1 mile intervals to be any use. I am sure they did have some on the route but probably far better to rely on a fast ambulance response time - Guildford was quite close to where it happened. I did have one ambulance go through in the leaving London leg and everyone moved over with the blues and twos going.

Its not unique to cycling either. This regularly happens on marathons. The London Marathon sudden cardiac death rate is 1 per 80,000 finishers so about par for this which has had one death now over three years of about 25,000 participants a year.

Not that any of that makes it less sad or less painful.

Re: Horse Riders

12 August 2014 - 9:14pm
Flinders wrote:skicat wrote:Flinders wrote:Horses have to be exercised to keep fit, including at times when bridleways are too muddy and arenas are waterlogged.
Many of the larger stables have horse-walkers. Just a big round cage with an electrically driven harness in the centre that rotates slowly and makes the animal walk round and round. Looks like something you might see at a fairground. I could never figure out why you couldn't put a large bag of carrots 6 feet in front of the horse and link it up to a generator instead of a motor. That way you'd get energy out of it rather than having to put it in.

I see those horse walkers in action quite a bit, and the horses don't seem to mind being on them, but it must be a bit boring. I get exceedingly bored on a turbo- so much so that I just don't use it when I ought to and get unfit if the weather is bad. I must get around to working out a way of getting a book stand on the handlebars.....


Audio book on a stereo off to the side (unless you like wearing headphones whilst riding...

Re: Cyclist dies on Surrey 100

12 August 2014 - 8:35pm
Oh but you go and ride these events completely unprepared. If you rode to prepare, you might become a - gasp! - cyclist. Here's another one doing 400 miles on no preparation https://mobile.twitter.com/Emily_News/s ... 160704?p=v

It's a tribute to the accessibility of cycling that there aren't more incidents.

Thoughts with the nearest of the London 100 rider.

Re: Cyclist dies on Surrey 100

12 August 2014 - 7:51pm
Colin_P wrote:It makes my mind boggle that on such a large sporting event they didn't seemingly have proper emergency medical facilities. For anything like this there should be an AED available or even several along the route. An AED is an Automatic External Defibrillator.


I was up in London ( not taking part not my type of game ) & I was struck at how old some of the riders where. You would have thought they would expect quite a few incidents and plan for it

Re: 'Cyclists Dismount', should we?

12 August 2014 - 7:24pm
I've always read that a non compliant sign is at bet just random colours on a pole at worst an unlawful obstruction of the highway.

Re: 'Cyclists Dismount', should we?

12 August 2014 - 7:06pm
Vorpal wrote:Mark1978 wrote:At the bottom of Northumberland Street (Newcastles main shopping street and pedestrianised) there is a red roundel with a cycle diagram but it's crossed out. I commented to my friend that meant cycling up there would be ok as that sign has no meaning.
It is the Traffic Regulation Order (TRO) or byelaw which you must obey, not the sign. And the offence won't be for ignoring the sign, but for doing something that is against the law or TRO.
But if the TRO requires traffic signs to be in place they must be the correct signs:

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1984/27/section/4
(1)A traffic regulation order may make provision for identifying any part of any road to which, or any time at which or period during which, any provision contained in the order is for the time being to apply by means of a traffic sign of a type or character specified in the order (being a type prescribed or character authorised under section 64 of this Act) and for the time being lawfully in place; and for the purposes of any such order so made any such traffic sign placed on and near a road shall be deemed to be lawfully in place unless the contrary is proved

In this case it may be academic because the intent of the sign is obvious but can a TRO ever be enforceable if its provisions for signage are not complied with? When I see that kind of unapproved sign, I tend to assume they have not been erected by the relevant authority and are not legally binding.

Re: 'Cyclists Dismount', should we?

12 August 2014 - 7:02pm
thirdcrank wrote:Mark1978 wrote:At the bottom of Northumberland Street (Newcastles main shopping street and pedestrianised) there is a red roundel with a cycle diagram but it's crossed out. I commented to my friend that meant cycling up there would be ok as that sign has no meaning.

Is there a streetview? The google car seems to have respected the pedestrianisation but I can't pick up the signs you refer to.

On Streetview there seems to be some sort of work going on and the sign isn't there. It was definitely there Sunday before last when I cycled past. (I didn't cycle up the street, no need to)

Re: 'Cyclists Dismount', should we?

12 August 2014 - 6:59pm
Vorpal wrote:Mark1978 wrote:At the bottom of Northumberland Street (Newcastles main shopping street and pedestrianised) there is a red roundel with a cycle diagram but it's crossed out. I commented to my friend that meant cycling up there would be ok as that sign has no meaning.
It is the Traffic Regulation Order (TRO) or byelaw which you must obey, not the sign. And the offence won't be for ignoring the sign, but for doing something that is against the law or TRO.

The TRO is only enforceable if the required signage is there to back it up. Both sides need to be in compliance otherwise you could be prosecuted for a completely unsigned restriction.

Re: 'Cyclists Dismount', should we?

12 August 2014 - 6:28pm
Mark1978 wrote:At the bottom of Northumberland Street (Newcastles main shopping street and pedestrianised) there is a red roundel with a cycle diagram but it's crossed out. I commented to my friend that meant cycling up there would be ok as that sign has no meaning.

Is there a streetview? The google car seems to have respected the pedestrianisation but I can't pick up the signs you refer to.

Re: Cyclist dies on Surrey 100

12 August 2014 - 6:28pm
Sudden Cardiac arrest.

I've suffered a few myself and am one of the lucky 5% to survive the first one.

It makes my mind boggle that on such a large sporting event they didn't seemingly have proper emergency medical facilities. For anything like this there should be an AED available or even several along the route. An AED is an Automatic External Defibrillator.

Kris Cook might well be alive today if those treating him had access to one.

Rest in peace Kris.

Re: 'Cyclists Dismount', should we?

12 August 2014 - 5:11pm
Mark1978 wrote:At the bottom of Northumberland Street (Newcastles main shopping street and pedestrianised) there is a red roundel with a cycle diagram but it's crossed out. I commented to my friend that meant cycling up there would be ok as that sign has no meaning.
It is the Traffic Regulation Order (TRO) or byelaw which you must obey, not the sign. And the offence won't be for ignoring the sign, but for doing something that is against the law or TRO.

Re: 'Cyclists Dismount', should we?

12 August 2014 - 5:03pm
Ah the popular sport of loopholing. I think that is one of the riskier signs to flout. I prefer to find rideable accessways with no signs.

Re: 'Cyclists Dismount', should we?

12 August 2014 - 4:37pm
At the bottom of Northumberland Street (Newcastles main shopping street and pedestrianised) there is a red roundel with a cycle diagram but it's crossed out. I commented to my friend that meant cycling up there would be ok as that sign has no meaning.

Re: 'Cyclists Dismount', should we?

12 August 2014 - 4:19pm
Sorry (was trying to clarify things)

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