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Re: And all she got was a penalty charge notice

25 December 2014 - 10:47am
Cunobelin wrote:.......Me I would have been clocking up the charges for the time

Spot on!

They have waived the release fee.....
Yep,unfortunately.
The disruption is ridiculous,she should've been arrested for causing a breach of the peace .

Re: Awful, awful cycling and I feel totally incensed

25 December 2014 - 10:27am
It means that if you are the innocent party you have evidence that you were dealing with a 'suicide cyclist'.

Don't forget the (imo bonkers) campaign to make things default to being the motorist's fault. If that comes in and you have no evidence, but it turns into an a said b said argument ... I wouldn't want to be in that situation.

I already wear a discreet Replay XD helmet cam most of the time - single button on, single button record, and I don't look like too much of a Meebon; I have a car one for Christmas Yay!

Ferdinand

Re: And all she got was a penalty charge notice

25 December 2014 - 9:54am
thirdcrank wrote:beardy

I am the driver for a blue badge holder - my mother. I've the booklet which came with the Blue Badge: The Blue Badge Scheme: rights and responsibilities in England. The first obvious point is that things may be different in Wales. One might be forgiven for thinking that the authorities are more keen on preventing alleged abuses of Blue Badges than, say, misuse of disabled parking bays.

A Blue Badge will help you to park close to your destination, either as a passenger or driver. However, the badge is intended for on-street parking only. Off-street car parks, such as those provided in local authority, hospital or supermarket car parks are governed by different rules.

My understanding is that a Blue Badge holder can park as a driver or passenger on yellow lines on a street, but not where there's also a loading ban, as a right conferred by the Blue Badge.

Elsewhere, it's unlawful to discriminate against the disabled and a Blue Badge is surely evidence of disability. So, had your parking bay been on street in England, the Blue Badge would have authorised you to park the car. If it were to be an off-street car park, then your passenger might have had grounds for an action for discrimination: I don't know.

The only place I've used - or rather my mother has used, her Blue Badge with me driving, has been to attend hospital appointments at Jimmy's in Leeds. The system there has worked well for us. This leads me to wonder what would have happened if, as in my mother's case, your passenger needed to be wheeled in a wheelchair by a carer and / or could not be left alone while their driver went off to park, even for a few moments. It's worth noting in this context that it seems some local authorities do not regard a diagnosis of even serious dementia as being a qualification for a Blue Badge.
=================================================================
edit to add

I've had a look on google to see if there's anything about parking at Mold Crown Court without success. That could be my lack of IT skills. I'll say with some confidence that the parking for the bigwigs will be ample.


As you have said there are some additional rules.

One is quite common sense in that a disabled driver is not exempt form being censured for stupid parking. Park on a zigzag line, block an entrance, or block a road and you are still open to prosecution

Also local rules can remove your right to park... some courts have no parking outside for "security reasons", but this should be clearly posted

Re: And all she got was a penalty charge notice

25 December 2014 - 9:47am
thirdcrank wrote:I thought this was as good a place as any to, er, park this.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-30591166

This bit caught my eye:

West Midlands Police said officers (sic) were there for a reassuring presence only and to prevent a breach of the peace.

Who were they reassuring? One of the pics shows a police van apparently parked in an area where parking is tightly controlled. (Before anybody points it out, I do know the van will have been exempt from the parking regs.)


THis one annoys m ein that he has got away with it...

They have waived the release fee.

Me I would have been clocking up the charges for the time

Re: Awful, awful cycling and I feel totally incensed

25 December 2014 - 9:27am
How does that help..id already seen him on my right cutting in front of a right turning vehicle.it was him doing a 90 degree turn across my bows that I couldn't have predicted.

Re: Grab Theft - handle bar kit

25 December 2014 - 8:02am
I thought everyone from London spoke with a German accent anyway. That there river ought to rhyme with "flames".

Re: Grab Theft - handle bar kit

25 December 2014 - 7:54am
No one ever say's 'I was robbed by a 'WHITE' male/female' even though they were. They only state 'He/She was 'Black,Asian, Polish etc' with
extra emphasis on the 'Race' and 'Accent'

Awful, awful cycling and I feel totally incensed

25 December 2014 - 6:05am
I experienced my very first dangerous cycling yesterday evening whilst driving from my brothers to maters whilst visiting family in Hull for Christmas. I was waiting in the centre straight on lane here https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.76845 ... z24DTg!2e0 a cyclist approached in right hand filter lane cutting across one car obviosuly turning right (so at that point thought he was turning right) and then he swerves right across me forcing me to brake, I alays check both mirrors before pulling away & was able to react in time but he missed my bonnet by inches, 80-90% of others i reckon there would have being a collison.
Annoyingly there's a cycle filter lane to the left of the straight on lane so there's enough space to go to the left and carry on straight, I've cycled this route many times in busy traffic so I know there is plenty enough space, either that or just sodding wait behind the 2 or 3 cars that were behind me..

I felt so angry..firstly because that's the worst bit of cycling I've seen personally, secondly because if it were not for my awareness and quick reactions he'd have been under my wheels or smashed into my windscreen (likely the former) causing me great consternation & a couple of hours wasted time at the scene and chasing up damages etc ..and thirdly it's p####s like that that propagate the them and us situation. well done

It's up there in the top 10 rank outrageously selfish, stupid & (comparatively) dangerous manoeuvres I've ever personally experienced and I've being around, both as a motorist (incl 7 years as a London commuter) & as a cyclist. Putting yourself in danger of being killed/seriously injured and the fallout for everyone else just makes my blood boil.

he had all the gear, a decent bike..good bright lights..noddy hat...but no flipping idea, I drove alongside for a short distance and told him what a twonk he was and that cycling like that is likely to get you killed & what peeves people off and makes it worse for the rest of us but he just blanked me..probably because he knew he was completely in the wrong.
I really wanted to pull up further and confront him but I suspect idiots like that don't give a flying one and won't learn until something drastic happens.

Well whomever you are Mr.selfishdontgiveaflyingfig one day you'll be under the wheels of someone not so alert to your rank stupidity and/or something much larger that won't see you cutting across dangerously and you'll be another statistic

Rant Over

Re: Grab Theft - handle bar kit

24 December 2014 - 9:19pm
Drifter wrote:It was at this point that someone else in the group said this was common place at certain junctions in London where it was usually a case of snatching panniers usually containing a laptop or tablet but handlebar mounted garmins & phones etc had also been taken too.
Worrying!

To get back on topic: I've often wondered about this vulnerability in Ortlieb panniers; they just unclip by grabbing the handle. I've seen bags snatched from the back seats of cars stuck in traffic jams in broad daylight so snatching bags from bikes wouldn't surprise me at all.

Luckily my home-made pannier doesn't have such a fancy quick-release mechanism and certainly, at twenty years' old, doesn't look too attractive to thieves.

Re: And all she got was a penalty charge notice

24 December 2014 - 8:38pm
I always want those tannoy messages to shame the person a bit more. 'Would the driver of a black ford focus, registration number AB12 CDE please move it, as you've parked like a .......'

Re: 10,000 miles in a year finally

24 December 2014 - 7:46pm
pedalsheep wrote: ... I'm currently at 10,375 ...


Before the doubters get going, Well done! There's still a week left to enjoy some more riding.

Re: 10,000 miles in a year finally

24 December 2014 - 7:34pm
Well done Nuke. 10,000 miles whilst holding down a full time job and looking after a family is certainly impressive. I'm currently at 10,375 but my part time job is becoming so part time as to be non existent and I've no kids to worry about which does make it easier.

Re: And all she got was a penalty charge notice

24 December 2014 - 7:32pm
I know that at our local Tesco's, where there is a row of disabled bays, the supermarket are pretty hot on the heels of anyone using those bays without a badge - you often hear messages paging customers with a specified car reg. no. What they do with offenders I don't know, presumably they can't involve the police since it is private land, but I have noticed, of late, that hardly any badgeless cars are parked in the bays - it seems that most motorists have got the message!

As for this silly episode in Birmingham, well I can only expand on the old proverb: "A fool and his money are soon parted, but a fool and his car - never!"

Re: Grab Theft - handle bar kit

24 December 2014 - 7:27pm
PH wrote:Drifter wrote:PH wrote:What makes it objectionable is it doesn't add anything to the information. If true and I've heard plenty of similar stories without ever seeing any facts, he stole it because he was a thieving scumbag, not because of his nationality.

It is the information! It's a fact! It's a description! It's a question specifically asked by the police. So there shouldn't be any objection!

The police would have also asked; height, build, hair colour, skin colour, distinguishing marks...
The way you report the story has a bias that isn't there in the facts.
it's the same as those newspaper headlines that shout "Cyclist mugs granny" when the muggers mode of transport isn't the relevant point.

What a very strange outlook!
Would the general public then consider all cyclist muggers?? I don't think so. What is your point?
It would be boring if we all had the same opinion but yours is most odd!
I certainly wasn't suggesting that all foreign speaking people are thieves!

Re: 10,000 miles in a year finally

24 December 2014 - 6:20pm
Nice one NUKe - I just passed 5,000 yesterday and was pleased with that having lost 10+ weeks to various ailments. 10,000 is a great achievement but for me that would probably be the precursor to a divorce! Lol

Re: 10,000 miles in a year finally

24 December 2014 - 5:28pm
154 miles to go... and counting down.

Re: 10,000 miles in a year finally

24 December 2014 - 5:06pm
NUKe wrote:I have been trying to do 10,000 miles in year for the last 4, And have been twarted by weather, injury and work but this year I have managed it. Finally passed the 10,000 mile mark for the year this morning
Congratulations that's some achievement.

Re: And all she got was a penalty charge notice

24 December 2014 - 4:24pm
beardy

I am the driver for a blue badge holder - my mother. I've the booklet which came with the Blue Badge: The Blue Badge Scheme: rights and responsibilities in England. The first obvious point is that things may be different in Wales. One might be forgiven for thinking that the authorities are more keen on preventing alleged abuses of Blue Badges than, say, misuse of disabled parking bays.

A Blue Badge will help you to park close to your destination, either as a passenger or driver. However, the badge is intended for on-street parking only. Off-street car parks, such as those provided in local authority, hospital or supermarket car parks are governed by different rules.

My understanding is that a Blue Badge holder can park as a driver or passenger on yellow lines on a street, but not where there's also a loading ban, as a right conferred by the Blue Badge.

Elsewhere, it's unlawful to discriminate against the disabled and a Blue Badge is surely evidence of disability. So, had your parking bay been on street in England, the Blue Badge would have authorised you to park the car. If it were to be an off-street car park, then your passenger might have had grounds for an action for discrimination: I don't know.

The only place I've used - or rather my mother has used, her Blue Badge with me driving, has been to attend hospital appointments at Jimmy's in Leeds. The system there has worked well for us. This leads me to wonder what would have happened if, as in my mother's case, your passenger needed to be wheeled in a wheelchair by a carer and / or could not be left alone while their driver went off to park, even for a few moments. It's worth noting in this context that it seems some local authorities do not regard a diagnosis of even serious dementia as being a qualification for a Blue Badge.
=================================================================
edit to add

I've had a look on google to see if there's anything about parking at Mold Crown Court without success. That could be my lack of IT skills. I'll say with some confidence that the parking for the bigwigs will be ample.

Re: proviz victim blaming advert

24 December 2014 - 3:41pm
Weirdly the areas with higher numbers of military personnel tend to link with higher cycling rates.

Bizarrely a lot of these cyclists are wearing camouflage gear

Yet the accident rate doesn't reflect this

There are two reasons.....

Either the MOD needs to rethink camouflage as it doesn't work

The visibility of the cyclist is not really a factor

Assuming that this isn't a satirical comment, I'd love to see a link to the study that supports this.

The active UK military are less than 0.5% of the population. A small proportion of these cycle, and a small proportion of this small proportion who cycle of the small proportion of the population who are in the military ignore the standard advice *not* to wear uniform off base, would be the ones who show up in *any* statistics. Arguing that the absence of impact by a tiny group on national statistics proves anything at all is quite ambitious imo .

@TonyR
Cunobelin wrote:
The visibility of the cyclist is not really a factor
Clearly not. As the recent Nottingham research showed, despite conspicuity aids making cyclists much more visible, they had no effect on their accident rates with motorists.

Can you point me to that study, please Tony? Do you mean the Phil Miller 2012 Thesis?

Ferdinand

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