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Updated: 4 min 48 sec ago

Re: Must've been Changeover Day?

1 September 2014 - 3:25pm
Mountain bikes? Pretty much necessary to drive them somewhere if you want to get a decent ride in the environment they were intended for.

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

1 September 2014 - 2:28pm
Psamathe wrote:On the CPR and doing it properly; it's many years since I was taught (on several courses) and I've never had to do it for real, but often when you see it being done on TV it's feeble and misleading. From my memory, it's meant to be done fairly hard (one course mentioned you might break a rib on your patient but better that and they live). And of course you can't do it on a person who does not need it. So when people keep seeing dainty little gentle presses (the "patient" would probably not even be aware of), I wonder if this is mis-directing the general public.

That said, it was years ago I was taught so maybe things have changed or my memory worsened (and I'm wrong).

Ian
Apparently it's pretty much inevitable that a rib will break - and that you will feel it.

Only time my instructor had *not* broken a rib was when the patient was concious (he'd been sent into vfib by a mains shock)

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

1 September 2014 - 2:26pm
gaz wrote:I hope the rider makes a full and swift recovery.

Has anyone completed an incident report form?

If I were on a club run I'd like to think the leader may have a First Aid kit, I don't think I'd go so far as to say I'd expect them to have one or be trained to use it. As to carrying a defibrillator...

I'm always a bit sceptical on "carrying a.first aid kit". If it's bad enough that you can't do without or improvise -will anything realistically feasible for a first aid kit help? eg defibrillator - spinal splint, leg splint, real drugs like morphine etc. If a sticky plaster or even triangular bandage is gonna help, I suggest you can do without. And if cycling in a group (give there'a "leader" who's expected to have a first aid kit) can't someone cycle off to the nearest house assuming no mobile phone coverage. Knowing a bit of first aid -fair enough - and if I'm hillwalking I tend to carry rather more - but things like electrical tape, folding "sam splint" to cover fractures, and anyway have walking sticks & bivi bag. But just for a bike ride, no

Re: 2 LeJog deaths: Death by dangerous driving charge

1 September 2014 - 2:06pm
It's just a sign of how the system is creaking at the seams. For all sorts of reasons, cases are taking longer to come to trial in the Crown Court and that's in no-one's interest. In spite of bail being given in cases where it would once have been considered unthinkable, the number of prisoners waiting months (ie in custody) for their case to be heard is leading to overcrowding and all the problems that creates. OTOH, long bail periods give the opportunity for further offending and witnesses can be intimidated or get cold feet.

Too many vested interests to do much about it, I fear, but the current Lord High Whatisname (Grayling?) seems to be intent on starving out the lawyers, rather than tackling them head on.

Re: 3rd time unlucky

1 September 2014 - 2:04pm
just use puncture proof tyres and tubes;i havent had a puncture for years using these.

Re: 2 LeJog deaths: Death by dangerous driving charge

1 September 2014 - 1:40pm
thirdcrank wrote:A year to get to court and in the meantime, a further serious offence has been committed, but nobody in authority seems to find this unacceptable or even worthy of comment.

Well his solicitor even exploited it by saying in his client's mitigation "that he had no previous convictions."

Re: 2 LeJog deaths: Death by dangerous driving charge

1 September 2014 - 1:25pm
Interesting point of British law there, but he was actually found guilty and sentenced to 7.5 years for each of the deaths, but British law has these running concurrently.

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

1 September 2014 - 1:25pm
On the CPR and doing it properly; it's many years since I was taught (on several courses) and I've never had to do it for real, but often when you see it being done on TV it's feeble and misleading. From my memory, it's meant to be done fairly hard (one course mentioned you might break a rib on your patient but better that and they live). And of course you can't do it on a person who does not need it. So when people keep seeing dainty little gentle presses (the "patient" would probably not even be aware of), I wonder if this is mis-directing the general public.

That said, it was years ago I was taught so maybe things have changed or my memory worsened (and I'm wrong).

Ian

Re: Any ideas?

1 September 2014 - 1:24pm
Phil,

I find that signalling with my right upper arm out horizontally and the forearm & hand vertically downwards generally conveys the clear message "Pass me at a safe distance."

It is obviously not a turn right signal.

Most motorists respond well : a few clowns shout or otherwise (deliberately) misunderstand. You will never stop the punishment passes, alas.

I suspect that a mechanical device for space-marking will be impractical.

If I had an ongoing problem, like yours, I would be getting one or more cameras and fluro waistcoat reading "On Video".

Re: Bike Security Locked At Supermarket Bike Rack

1 September 2014 - 1:19pm
I've seen people carting their Brompton round the shop in one of the large trolleys....

Re: Energy, Fuel, 2nd Wind, Motivation

1 September 2014 - 11:53am
The other effect that hasn't been mentioned is that the body can burn fat for fuel as well (even a skinny cyclist has some) but most of our bodies aren't used to doing this. I know a hardcore ironman triathlete who does 80 mile training rides without eating before/during and only drinks water. He reckons this gets his body used to burning fat, so he doesn't suffer so much when the carbs run out in an event. He gets good results, so he must be doing something right. For us mortals who keep shovelling in the cake, the fat-burning path isn't well enough developed to sustain reasonable cycling speed.

If you've carb loaded effectively, you should have enough fuel for around 2 hours of activity, which is why marathon runners hit the wall at around 20 miles.

Sugars can't be absorbed in the mouth, but I think an Australian research group showed that as soon as they were detected in the mouth, the body would release more reserves. Eating something sweet certainly seems to produce a response faster than anything could get through to the blood stream.

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

1 September 2014 - 11:46am
[XAP]Bob wrote:When I last had CPR training it was being questioned due to the damage you could do the patient (I'm not kidding)
Apparently breaking a rib was bad, and could result in being sued for deliberately causing injury....

Anyhow we did the training anyway, because the instructor could see sense. Of course he was also talking about having a tattoo on his chest:

"In case of heart failure press here:X"

Someone commented on the "risk of doing harm" with CPR by explaining "the patient is currently dead, how much worse can you make it"

Re: Help with choosing bike type and/or commute through Lond

1 September 2014 - 11:24am
Vorpal wrote:Well... sometimes it's just impossible to stay dry. The only real solution is carrying a change of clothes. Stick them in a couple of layers of carrier bag, or better a bag that seals. You can strap that to a rack or put it in another bag.

This time of year, you can wear shoes that dry quickly, like sandals. They can be worn later into the the autumn by adding something like Sealskinz socks. Otherwise, maybe you can keep a pare pair of shoes (even crocs, or something?) in your locker.

To be honest I would probably do that anyway as I wouldn't want to wear the same clothes I cycled in due to sweat and comfort. Cycling shoes as well. I wonder though, if you cycled and your clothes got wet, do you wear the same clothes you changed into on the way back? What if you used cycling clothes? Would you need two sets in rain or do you have somewhere to dry them?

By the way, I have a u lock and would like to get a second lock. Since I can leave the locks there, is there any advantage to a chain over another u lock? I've heard people say you need two separate tools to break different kinds of locks but that doesn't really make any sense. Heavy duty bolt croppers should be able to cut most locks and angle grinders pretty much all of them. Perhaps chains would be more susceptible to bolt croppers and u locks could be attacked with a car jack - but with a good enough lock and locking technique the argument doesn't hold.

Anyway thanks again.

Edit: looking back through this thread I noticed that you also gave this advice. I have the fahgettaboudit mini and use the Sheldon Brown technique. I need something larger for the front wheel and will leave the saddle and post in the locker.

Re: Energy, Fuel, 2nd Wind, Motivation

1 September 2014 - 11:08am
Judging the amount of CHO to eat before a bike ride is tricky for the newbie.

It is dependent upon the cyclist's capability ( Watts for 1 hour ) and the Watts demand of the ride ahead.

The greater the cyclist's capability and the lower the demand of the trip, the less CHO the rider needs to eat beforehand.

A seasoned Audax rider who was a TT racer, with a 60 minute 300 Watts, will be using approx. 25% of that capability to ride a 200 km Audax, so the cyclist might eat 25% of the physics calculated CHO.
On the other hand, a newbie cyclist who can keep up 150 Watts in the 1 hour test, will be utilising 50% of his capability on the same ride, so will be encouraged to eat 50% of the physics calculated CHO for the ride.
Really newbie riders would not be advised to attempt a 200 km Audax without any idea of what they could sustain for 60 minutes on an ergometer.
If they do attempt the ride, they would be wise to eat 100% of the physics calculated CHO.

Re: Any ideas?

1 September 2014 - 11:00am
I appreciate that some of the Boadicea type suggestions are made in jest, but for anybody who's tempted to follow them up, remember s 3 of the Criminal Damage Act:

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1971/48/section/3

Re: Energy, Fuel, 2nd Wind, Motivation

1 September 2014 - 10:59am
"So, getting more energy a few miles after starting out - is that 2nd wind ?"

No.
That is your vascular and pulmonary systems dilating in response to some exercise.

"2nd Wind" is the release of adrenaline in response to sustained exercise. This condition can be fuelled with simple sugars such as glucose.

When you get endorphins and any sensations in your legs disappear, that's 'flying on wings'. Putting sugars in your stomach now is like 'tipping the nitro can'.

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

1 September 2014 - 10:55am
Here's how to avoid the need to carry one about: get it delivered -

http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/201 ... brillators

Re: Any ideas?

1 September 2014 - 10:54am
Yeah, I do the same with pannier, and think it helps. The arm idea is really a trade off, ****** off response to a couple of stupid close passes versus happy 99 percent of the time to go with the flow of traffic. In some ways it might cause more problems than it cures, I actually enjoy riding and treat interaction with other traffic as I would normally when driving. Almost wonder if I would actually come across more as a 'silly' cyclist by having something like this, still debating. Perhaps a hand on the end of the arm with the second finger raised? And for added effect, Stanley knife blades for finger nails?

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

1 September 2014 - 10:28am
When I last had CPR training it was being questioned due to the damage you could do the patient (I'm not kidding)
Apparently breaking a rib was bad, and could result in being sued for deliberately causing injury....

Anyhow we did the training anyway, because the instructor could see sense. Of course he was also talking about having a tattoo on his chest:

"In case of heart failure press here:X"

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