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Updated: 2 hours 21 min ago

Re: Advice on accident involving a dog

8 September 2014 - 8:12pm
Cheers Gaz. I've been a member for over 2 years, never had an accident until the weekend though hence the amazingly high (not) post count.

Appreciate your advice and anyone else who has experience of a similar situation.

Thanks again.

Re: Biker's death filmed - horrific.

8 September 2014 - 8:11pm
I don't flash bikers - no point in two people being dazzled.

You might notice me dip my rvm if you were following me with either main beam on or a flickering dip. Means I might not see your overtake beginning though, but it does mean I can better focus on where I'm going.

Re: Biker's death filmed - horrific.

8 September 2014 - 7:53pm
Bonefishblues wrote:I ride a huge bright green motorcycle whose twin headlights sit on full beam on bright sunny days



Apropos of nothing is there a debate in motorcycle circles about this practice? I try not to get wound up as a driver but there are few MORE distracting things than a motorcycle approaching from front or rear with flickering full beam.

I understand it's to be seen (I assume) but its very much on the increase it seems to me, and there's a part of me which wonders if it's becoming counterproductive.
I only use it in bright sunlight where imo it's really not that bright.

If the beam is flickering I'd suggest it's actually on dipped, the flickering you see is because the cut off for the dipped beam is roughly in line with your eyes (particularly when when accelerating). Full beam doesn't flicker because it doesn't have a cut off. One of the problems is that motorcycle headlights are physically set quite high.

(You wouldn't be the first motorist I've had flashing me and then switching to full beam to make a point when I'm on dipped lights - something that bizarrely I've never had on full beam! - If I did I'd switch back to dipped).

Re: Advice on accident involving a dog

8 September 2014 - 7:38pm
Welcome to the forum, sorry to hear of the incident.

You'll find some general advice on all accidents here. The best way to proceed is with proper legal advice. If you are a CTC member contact the accident help line.

If not see if you have any free legal advice through household insurance, union membership, etc. Personal injury solicitors may also be able to help.

Re: Biker's death filmed - horrific.

8 September 2014 - 7:26pm
Tonyf33 :
On this public forum, at this time, I think that your derisory descriptions of the deceased are inappropriate. The tone is wrong and socially unacceptable.

Your comments about risk-taking, putting others at risk and poor judgement are all reasonable.

New York is the best cycling city in the US ....

8 September 2014 - 7:05pm
...... apparently, doubt Dulcie Canton agrees! http://vimeo.com/105250259 (seen on Bike Snob)

To see how good the NYPD are read the description for the vid.

Re: Biker's death filmed - horrific.

8 September 2014 - 5:48pm
You make the point exactly, some people don't like saying what they think, you've said that about yourself right here...I said what I think and I have no qualms about that, I don't need to wait and say something insipid and weak and meaningless at X point after the event.
IMO forummers need to get over the fact the motorcyclist died and look at the fact that he was a part and parcel of the incident happening through his own wrongdoing, not just a tippy toe over the line but a huge step over that line that could and often does have huge ramifications to other road users/innocent parties.
Blindly ignoring that does a diservice to the rest of us whom want to be safe and stick to the rules

As for EllieB, It's okay for people to disagree, I don't care what others think, it won't stop me from posting what I think, what I object to is a poster making out that I said I was glad that they died..that's bang out of order.
As for Vorpal accusing me of name calling, well I've seen plenty of angry posts on this forum that never get even a sniff of derision when 'name calling' is going on aplenty..motorvehicle drivers, judges, other cyclists all being called out yet I'm the one being told off/berated for speaking my mind about a person prepared to ride his motorbike in a way that was reckless and dangerous..
Because that's fair isn't it

Re: Biker's death filmed - horrific.

8 September 2014 - 5:01pm
Tonyf33 wrote:Ellieb wrote:Given that the family of the biker who died must have known that it would reveal poor riding from their son, but chose to release the video in order to allow others to learn, I think the tone of your comments are really disrespectful and inappropriate.
Sorry, how is that so? Not one single thing I said is untrueTony, I think you're missing Ellie B's point. What you posted may indeed be the truth of the matter, but there are times when certain things, however true, however much you feel impelled to say them, are best left unsaid, at least for the time being.

Many times I've drafted a post to go on this forum (or elsewhere), looked at it under the Preview button for a minute or so, then thought to myself "no, I really oughtn't to post that". So I click on the Back button and away it goes. We all get carried away at times. What's posted is posted. Sometimes I've made the wrong decision and posted anyway.

In this case, remember that David Holmes' family, after a lot of heartache, agreed to release the video. That must have been incredibly brave of them. Please don't make it harder for them! Even if his parents are not searching the internet for comments, his friends no doubt are, and stuff like this thread will get passed on.

So - sorry: I'm with Ellie on this one.

Re: Biker's death filmed - horrific.

8 September 2014 - 4:23pm
We have a junction near us, where we regularly turn left onto the main road. Both the road we're on, and the main road are 30mph limits. The viz out of the side road we are emerging from is poor but adequate. Trouble is, often the traffic coming up on the main road from the right is doing well over the limit.

We pull out when the road is clear, but by the time we're on the main road, there's someone standing on their brakes and hooting their horn.

there's no guarantee the guy would have been alive had he been at the speed limit whereas there IS a guarantee he'd have been alive had the driver actually paid attention.

Re: Biker's death filmed - horrific.

8 September 2014 - 3:11pm
Ben@Forest wrote:I also wonder if the motorcycle rider would be getting quite as much sympathy if he'd hit the middle of the car more squarely and killed, let's say a mother and her two-year-old child.
But he didn't. I don't think anyone has any doubt there were two folk guilty here. One of stupidity and the other of negligence.
If there's any sympathy to go around I think he paid a high price (some on here obviously think "fair") for being stupid while as always seems to be the case the negligent party pays a much lower one.

20 years ago I had almost exactly the same accident except in my case it was a lorry that pulled out from my left to turn right and the road was a 60mph A road. I watched the driver looking to his left at an oncoming car then expected him to check right again as the car passed - he didn't, he simply followed it out of the side road, I hit the truck and was thrown over the top, shattering my shoulder and breaking various other bones. Of course it wasn't his fault - I *must* have been speeding because otherwise he'd have seen me - a story he maintained even when the police report put my speed under the limit. In the end there was no prosecution and it was written off as an accident.

So seriously - is it really that hard to actually check that there's nothing coming? Forget the 100mph nonsense these sorts of accidents happen day in and day out on roads all over the country.
Other than timing there's no guarantee the guy would have been alive had he been at the speed limit whereas there IS a guarantee he'd have been alive had the driver actually paid attention.

Re: Biker's death filmed - horrific.

8 September 2014 - 3:05pm
I fully explained my reservations about the word 'blame' and used it only in the way it is commonly used to mean the majority of the responsibility for the collision. In my opinion that lay with the turning driver despite the reckless speed of the motorcyclist. I can quite see why you may disagree. Note that in your German example that it doesn't shift the majority of responsibility from one to the other it merely allocates partial (though not equal) responsibility to the speeding party. That is roughly in accordance with my view of this incident.

On here we know how hard it is to get the cps to prosecute never mind secure a conviction for the most serious charge of causing death by dangerous driving. In order for that to occur it must have been obvious that the driver should have seen the bike and should not have turned.

Re: Biker's death filmed - horrific.

8 September 2014 - 2:35pm
Bicycler wrote:I think the car driver was still to 'blame' for this one if that word is even appropriate in such a scenario...

I think the motorcycle rider was equally to blame. Interestingly, in Germany, where every petrolhead will tell you there's no speed limit on autobahns there is a recommended speed limit:

On motorways, a recommended speed limit (Richtgeschwindigkeit) of 130 km/h (81 mph) applies. While driving at higher speeds is not punishable, the increased risk induced by higher speeds (erhöhte Betriebsgefahr) may result in partial liability for damages.

What it means is that if someone doing 80kmh pulls out into an outside lane without careful observation and a Porsche is coming up at 200 kmh and rear-ends him the Porsche driver is still partially at fault at least in the insurance payouts. And that isn't an example - that's a true incident. I also wonder if the motorcycle rider would be getting quite as much sympathy if he'd hit the middle of the car more squarely and killed, let's say a mother and her two-year-old child.

Re: Ten Miles a Day

8 September 2014 - 2:24pm
Earlier this year I saw this thread and struck me as a great idea so I aimed for the 10 miles per day. And most of the year I managed to stay ahead of the target. And I'm now on 14.1 miles per day. And as we get well through the year it gets harder to "move" the average, so my personal target has now switched to 5000 miles a year. And I'm on-target except we are nearing the end of the fine weather to I expect that, being a fair weather recreational cyclist, more days will become non-cycling days as rain & winds start to become more frequent - so it is probably going to be close.

Ian

Re: Action on Dangerous Drivers - Worth the Effort

8 September 2014 - 11:46am
Yes, I think it is worth reporting incidents. I only report the worst ones to the police, the rest to the company if identifiable, especially if I had a camera running (which is only a minority of rides these days). I usually identify the driver and vehicle if possible because you never know if they'll just change job if the company gets stricter about bad driving. The company may be pressuring the drivers with unrealistic timetables, but even then the driver is still making the immediate decision that the timetable is more important than the safety of other road users.

Sometimes I'm fairly sure it's sheer negligence from drivers working for firms that I don't believe are routinely pressuring their drivers, like the van of a local family-owned seller of safety signs and equipment, which overtook me on an on-road bit of NCN11 on a blind bend, then pulled in and slammed its brakes on to make a right turn. I was glad I'd started applying the brakes during the overtake else I would have been splatted into the safety slogans on its back door

Or the bus driver reading from a book. Which reminds me to chase up https://mobile.twitter.com/Norfolkgreen ... 0843848704

Re: Action on Dangerous Drivers - Worth the Effort

8 September 2014 - 11:34am
Graham wrote:I often wonder if the offending driver is ever REALLY fired.
It must be so tempting for the company person to use such a statement as a fob-off to placate the complainant.

The usual response in any organisation is for the insiders to close ranks and ignore or fob-off the outside threat.

How will we ever know if they are REALLY fired ??

That is why I always follow up with the video

Having to write a letter retracting and apologising for their previous statement is something managers hate as it makes them look inefficient and stupid. They then take this out on the driver who has put them in that position by lying.

... and yes they do get fired.

Re: Action on Dangerous Drivers - Worth the Effort

8 September 2014 - 9:25am
ummm no. If your numbers up, its up. This is of course taking into account that you've done everything to protect yourself.

I have a 2 step process for this

1) Take up some kind of religious or superstitious belief. Try crossing your fingers just before that HGV rumbles by...
2) If that doesnt work complain to whatever diety you want to believe in when you get there...

Re: Biker's death filmed - horrific.

8 September 2014 - 8:10am
I don't see what the problem is.

The driver admitted he didn't see the motorcycle and there was no reason that he shouldn't have done. He was prosecuted and found guilty.

As a motorcyclist (and cyclist) I'm frankly more than a little annoyed how frequently stuff like this happens. I ride a huge bright green motorcycle whose twin headlights sit on full beam on bright sunny days yet I've lost count of the number of times I've had to actually stop to let the car that was in the process of cutting across my lane pass. Often without even looking in the direction they're travelling!

If the guy had seen the bike and misjudged the speed then I'd have had some sympathy but he didn't.

Re: Cyclist killed in lorry collision

8 September 2014 - 7:47am
RIP Condolences to family and friends

Re: Solo night ride

8 September 2014 - 7:06am
It sounds like you have the option to auto recalculate the route turned on. Turn this off and also turn on the option for off course warnings. This should help you stay on course. Sounds like a great ride.

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