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Updated: 9 min 39 sec ago

Re: fewer motorists fined for mobile use

17 April 2015 - 12:57pm
TrevA wrote:But you still see plenty of people doing it. I count several on every journey i make, either by bike or car.
This is what I can't understand. I see the same and if we are both seeing this, how come a plain clothed Police car isn't as well and thus isn't booking all these people. They could be getting loads every day. And after a few weeks word would get around and people would no longer feel they wont get caught and will stop (or reduce) their use.

But as things stand, I'd expect we all see this regularly (I nearly got squashed by a van coming towards me on a to lane road because the driver was on his phone and not watching which side of the road he was on) and nothing will improve unless something starts to get enforced.

Ian

Re: fewer motorists fined for mobile use

17 April 2015 - 12:24pm
Best way to catch them would be via unmarked police van.... higher up so i can see all the 'held down by the gear lever / on the knee' mobiles....... 4 last week on a short stretch of M61 , another 3-4 this morning.......

Re: fewer motorists fined for mobile use

17 April 2015 - 12:19pm
But you still see plenty of people doing it. I count several on every journey i make, either by bike or car.

Re: fewer motorists fined for mobile use

17 April 2015 - 11:37am
mercalia wrote:rather depressing that there has been a fall in fines given out -
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-32337990

Often a reduction in prosecutions for something is given as evidence of reduced offending. Why do you think that this is reduced enforcement rather than reduced offending? My observation is that most people now think using a mobile phone is taboo, whereas not long ago it was thought to be the whole point of the thing.

Re: fewer motorists fined for mobile use

17 April 2015 - 11:06am
It isn't an "easy pinch" - unlike a cyclist riding on the pavement.

Re: fewer motorists fined for mobile use

17 April 2015 - 11:03am
They're getting away with everything these days it seems and they very well know they can.
The missus and I were on our way back to mine yesterday on the M61 where they are upgrading it to a 'smart motorway' and there is a 50mph speed limit because of the roadworks. We were doing according to her speedo, 48mph and some idiot using a mobile undertook us doing probably 70mph. It happens all the time.

fewer motorists fined for mobile use

17 April 2015 - 10:47am
rather depressing that there has been a fall in fines given out -

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-32337990

I dont think the softly softly approach that many polieforces doing makes a difference

Re: Route from Bala to Dolgellau advice.

16 April 2015 - 9:55pm
As A roads go, that stretch to Dolly from the west end of Lake Bala is pretty good outside peak season. Often quietish, smooth tarmac, no steep sections and wide for much of it's length. It can be done in about an hour IIRC.

Re: Disappointing For Cyclists in Radstock

16 April 2015 - 9:09pm
Dave W wrote:I thought there was a short cut that definitely avoids the double roundabout - not sure about the new roundabout.

http://www.gps-routes.co.uk/routes/home ... ycle-route

Have to say Radstock has become a total bottleneck particularly when driving in from Trowbridge to visit Bike It to get my bike serviced.

Hi Dave. There used to be before all the regeneration work. It was a source of lots of complaints on the NCN24 as it was so tricky. I'm hoping they fix something up. I'm hoping once the housing is finished they'll make this link safe and cycle friendly rather than 'pedestrianising' us.

Still waiting to get advice from our CTC rep...b

Re: What is gr8 about motorcycling?

16 April 2015 - 8:31pm
To give my opinion on whether motorbikes are more like cars or bicycles; neither. They have similarities with each and their own unique characteristics.

The attraction and the practicality will, obviously, depend on the person and how they use it.

As for assisted pedal cycles - well, back in the past (till the early 80s?) mopeds had pedals with which they could, at least in theory, be powered, and often that was how you started the motor. Nowadays that's completely gone and a moped is just a small, low-powered, usually speed-restricted (used to be 30+/5mph in UK, now I think it's 45km/h EU) motorcycle. It would, as has already been said, be possible to line up historic vehicles and show a clear progression from early 20th century bicycle-with-engine to modern motorbike, and a moped would be a sort of off-shoot of this. So philosophically or intellectually, I agree with the view that power-assisted pedal cycles are fundamentally not pedal cycles, regardless of how that assistance is provided. However, in practice they have - at the moment - more in common with bicycles than with motor vehicles, as far as I can tell from observation, not having ridden one.

But having that power on tap clearly enables them to do things a normal bike with a normal rider wouldn't. For instance, there's a father of a child at my son's school who takes his kid to school on an electric-assisted bike. He rides up a short section of hill which is about 1:6 then does a U-turn onto the pavement and up an equally steep but narrow path to the main pavement which is some six or so feet above road level. He comes to an almost complete stop, turns, then powers up the next slope. All this with a child of about 8 on the back. No way most people would be able to do that on a non-assisted bike (and he doesn't look particularly sporty). I therefore do wonder about the effect they will have on what we so fondly know as Silly Sustrans Gates (other providers of cycle path obstacles are available!). The extra power gives more control at low speed, negating those obstacles, as well as enabling higher speeds and hill climbing. With the UK climate so much in favour of these obstacles (to prevent danger from speeding lycra louts or keep motorbikes off paths, variously) I fear the growth of electric bikes - they are quite popular here (Bristol) - will see a corresponding growth in number and severity of such obstacles.

(Haven't ridden a motorbike for 20 years but used to do 50,000 miles a year as a courier.)

Re: I Got Nudged

16 April 2015 - 8:11pm
Bicycler wrote:Ah, the attitude to elderly drivers no longer able to drive competently. No-one wants to deprive a pensioner of their transport do they? Incidents which should raise everyone's attention to the danger are turned a blind eye. Vision requirements are unenforced but then they aren't going very fast or very far and only in daylight so it's okay. This just seems the right thing to do until....
...someone gets hurt or killed and then the question is "why wasn't he stopped from driving?" I remember my granddad's driving in his later years from when I was a child. My mum insisted I walk home rather than accept a lift. If I get to the point where I don't trust my dad to drive he won't be driving unless a doctor tells me he is fit and I would notify the DVLA if I thought he might be inclined to do so. I don't want innocent people hurt and I don't want his final years scarred by the memory and guilt of causing a horrific incident.

As ever with driver licensing it is a privilege, not a right and it must be dependent upon meeting all the criteria to be able to safely operate the vehicle. A tonne of metal hurts as much when it hits you regardless of the age of the driver. We cannot have lower standards for the elderly.
Absolutely spot on!

Re: Disappointing For Cyclists in Radstock

16 April 2015 - 8:00pm
I thought there was a short cut that definitely avoids the double roundabout - not sure about the new roundabout.

http://www.gps-routes.co.uk/routes/home ... ycle-route

Have to say Radstock has become a total bottleneck particularly when driving in from Trowbridge to visit Bike It to get my bike serviced.

Re: I Got Nudged

16 April 2015 - 7:06pm
Not just elderly drivers. Everyone should consider it a privilege, not, a right. I can never understand the reticence in some cases to just take away a drivers licence for a misdemeanour. Minimal cost, sliding scale? What could be easier and more effective?

Re: What is gr8 about motorcycling?

16 April 2015 - 5:05pm
kwackers wrote:Personally I think you open more wormy cans



Yes and despite the pedantry, it's quite an important topic (I think we've well and truly hijacked this thread BTW ).

I have a friend who loves motorcycling - he regularly takes on the rough roads in Morocco. I can relate to all that, just as I occasionally fly, use trains and, yes, travel by car. But as a society we need to make distinctions (sometimes unfairly and arbitrarily). For example:

I don't think motorcycles should be allowed in bus lanes (mind you, I don't think buses should be either).
I don't think jet skis should be allowed on quiet stretches of coastline.
I think historic vehicles should be allowed where other cars might be banned.

To answer the OP's question and thinking of my friend in Morocco, I think motorcycling is an incredibly attractive activity. It's just that it belongs IMV in a different box from cycling.

Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

16 April 2015 - 4:50pm
stuff about plastic hats moved to: viewtopic.php?f=41&t=95943 please conduct further debate on the subject there not here. Thank you.

Re: A recommended book for every Cyclist

16 April 2015 - 4:20pm
The main thing that I have learned is to cycle too close to carb.

Think you might be missing a 'not' in there?
And it looks like your auto-spell corrector is playing silly billies with 'kerb'


Yep, of the publications available it's the one that I've tended to point people towards. Although, recently talking to a cycle training organisation and they were suggesting that the latest edition is starting to veer away from National Standards - thus I must get around to reading a new one to see what the differences are.

Re: Tolerance of heat and cold.

16 April 2015 - 3:30pm
I think you can general acclimatise to warmer places if you give yourself time, and don't protect yourself too much from the conditions, eg, avoid using aircon places in warm countries - just suffer till you get used to it. On the other hand, exposing yourself excessively to the conditions too quickly is a route to heat-stroke or exposure.

I think of myself as being a cold-country person, happy to ride in shorts most days on Icelandic tours. But when I was in Malaysia I eventually utterly acclimatised myself to the place, to the extent I was getting cold at night and needed a blanket when the temp fell below about 26C. After riding in temps of up to 37 and high humidity, (mid-winter) Burma with daytime temps of 30 or so, was very pleasant. Then I got home to England and shivered for a fortnight.

A recommended book for every Cyclist

16 April 2015 - 3:02pm
I have to recommend this book. Cyclecraft. After looking on the internet( mainly Youtube ) I have failed to find any significant advice for good cycling, especially for the UK. Youtube link is worth watching. https://www.youtube.com/user/sillycyclists
Before the book I was always be a careful cyclist. I use lights in the daytime including one on the helmet. I thought about going without a helmet because apparently it makes drivers keep their distance overtaking.

What I like about this book is it give a lot of in-depth information about different kinds of junction on the road including how to approach them. The main thing that I have learned is to cycle too close to carb. On a quiet road, I will drive in the primary position on the road. If a car comes up behind me, I will let him pass when it is safe, ‘not to soon and not to late’. No driver has got annoyed or in patient. I actually feel much safer on the road and get to my destination much quicker also.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_ ... cyclecraft

Re: I Got Nudged

16 April 2015 - 2:35pm
Mark1978 wrote:That's one of my pet hates. Drivers don't stop at a give way they are constantly edging forward. Like somehow if they don't come to a complete stop that's faster?
I suppose it’s rather a question of it being easier (for driver and clutch alike) to keep some momentum rather than stop and restart. Of course this is no excuse to drive into cyclists or anyone else.

I have been nudged like this on a Vespa but never on a bicycle. But it is a constant worry at lights and roundabouts.

Re: What is gr8 about motorcycling?

16 April 2015 - 1:55pm
Bicycler wrote:I think the clue in the phrase 'electrical assistance' is the word 'assistance'. I think we can draw a line between a battery backup used to assist a primarily human powered vehicle and a vehicle which requires no human propulsion.
Yeah... I think the word assistance isn't really of much use. On max assistance on a lot of bikes it's anything but, in reality you're controlling the speed of the bike by how fast you turn the pedals, in essence they become a sort of 'rotary throttle'.
Bicycler wrote:I repeat that it is this human propulsion which defines cycling for me. I could swap my bikes for tricycles, handcycles or pedal cars and when riding I would still in my mind be doing the same activity.
What about vehicles with no wheels? (For example a paddle boat) Do they count?
Personally I think you open more wormy cans with your definition than simply saying anything that has a motor doesn't count.

Bicycler wrote:What you are missing is that only you is trying to limit this to pedal bicycles. Horizon originally said cycles. Not all human powered cycles have the balance and control issues you view as central to cycling.
Did he? Fair enough. If which case we're talking about the motive mechanism and so can rule out everything with a motor and I'm happy to concur.

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