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Updated: 36 min 45 sec ago

Re: Must've been Changeover Day?

1 September 2014 - 6:03pm
Last day of school holidays, maybe many returning from a trip away?

Re: Can I have a moan?

1 September 2014 - 5:56pm
BigFoz wrote:In the case of the car dumped on a driveway, what would happen if you decided you no longer wanted a driveway and bricked it off from the road before said tool returned from holiday?
Who knows...
What about bikes chained to railings, suppose you uprooted the railing and threw it in a skip? Same principle I'd have thought...

I tried to find the article, sure it was on the Beeb website.

Re: Solo night ride

1 September 2014 - 5:53pm
My windstopper jacket (sometimes called a Roubaix jacket, possibly just to annoy Spesh - my exact one is a Tenn but it's not currently available AFAICT) copes with a surprisingly wide range of temperatures, about 0-16 depending what's underneath. Worth considering?

If you have a non-fixable mechanical miles from anywhere then carrying the bike will keep you warm

Re: Can I have a moan?

1 September 2014 - 5:25pm
In the case of the car dumped on a driveway, what would happen if you decided you no longer wanted a driveway and bricked it off from the road before said tool returned from holiday?

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

1 September 2014 - 5:10pm
timdownieuk wrote:Why either/or? If you're on your own clearly you go for CPR. The best way however to restore circulation after cardiac arrest is to restore rhythm, something a defibrillator does much better.

If you are on your own you get help first, 999, the help will bring the defib. then carry out CPR, otherwise you will be doing CPR until the cows come home.

I think a lot of people don't realise that if someone has a cardiac arrest, they will be lucky if they survive. Including the woman that did it on my Father when he died. She was most upset, when I spoke to her at his funeral, that she didn't save him. I tried to explain to her that there was a slim chance that it would help, and I thanked her for trying.Don't get me wrong 5% is better than 0. and it is worth doing something. people don't survive a cardiac arrest when there in a heart ward in hospital, where they have all the kit, so in the street, you are on the back foot from the start.
If you are far away from a defib, out in the stcks, then in my experience then the odd are even slimmer. I'm a member of a mountain rescue team and all the cardiac arrests I have attended in remote places, or have known about, have been fatal.

Neil

Re: Solo night ride

1 September 2014 - 5:01pm
Again some fantastic advice thanks everyone.

2 point have sprung to mind since Saturday....

What with the BiL it got me thinking on what sort of id I should be taking in case the worse happened. Originally I was only going to have my wallet with 2 bits of plastic and my phone. Anyone have any thoughts?

Theres been quite a range of temperatures over the past week, everything from what you'd expect for an August night/morning to bloody freezing. I'm gong to cop out if the forecast is for too much rain but anyone with any ideas on a what to take in terms of clothing. Main worry is having a non-fixable mechanical and ending up miles from anywhere and being freezing or the other extreme lugging around clothes I don't need. Will only be taking a smallish day pack. Again any thoughts?
Thanks

Re: Can I have a moan?

1 September 2014 - 4:47pm
We got a 'charge' for parking in an Aldi car park for too long - reason being my wife had to rush our daughter to hospital an an ambulance! Even then we were only half an hour over.
Appealed it to Parking Eye and then declined it and sent it to the ombudsman but we haven't heard anything for weeks so I'm assuming it's finished with!

Re: Can I have a moan?

1 September 2014 - 4:45pm
beardy wrote:You dont take them to court for damages, you take them for breach of contract.

They have accepted the contract offered in the big prominently displayed sign to park on your property for the fee of £85 by the act of parking there, if they dont pay after taking the service offered then they are in breach of contract.

Except that its subject to the Unfair Terms in Consumer Contracts Regulations 1999: any parking charges have to be reasonable for the services provided and that would be judged by what the local market price was for equivalent service level parking. If I got such a notice I would ignore it. They would then have to take me to Court where it would be assigned to the Small Claims track. Worst case I end up paying the parking fee and they end up having to swallow their costs of taking me to Court. Likely case they might get a fiver and still have to swallow their costs. What they are relying on is people not knowing that and paying up.

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

1 September 2014 - 4:43pm
[XAP]Bob wrote:
Holywood CPR is great though - Take a 3 week decayed corpse, 3 chest compressions and they'll spit out a mouthful of seawater (despite this being in the middle of the desert) and run a marathon...

I did read that the success rate for CPR so something like 5% - not sure how that's defined.

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

1 September 2014 - 4:39pm
beardy wrote:It isnt just the initial purchase price of the AED units. They need servicing and spare or replacement batteries, I suspect they may be over a hundred pounds per year for its upkeep.

You can buy one with lithium batteries that last 5 years. After that time it must me returned for refurbishment @ £350 + VAT or you can get one with a 3.5 year battery life tha is user replaceable that cost £125 + VAT.

IF I were serious about buying one, I'd probably plump for the 5 year one and bet on unit prices falling.

Tim

Re: Must've been Changeover Day?

1 September 2014 - 4:25pm
Mountain bikes? Pretty much necessary to drive them somewhere if you want to get a decent ride in the environment they were intended for.

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

1 September 2014 - 3:28pm
Psamathe wrote:On the CPR and doing it properly; it's many years since I was taught (on several courses) and I've never had to do it for real, but often when you see it being done on TV it's feeble and misleading. From my memory, it's meant to be done fairly hard (one course mentioned you might break a rib on your patient but better that and they live). And of course you can't do it on a person who does not need it. So when people keep seeing dainty little gentle presses (the "patient" would probably not even be aware of), I wonder if this is mis-directing the general public.

That said, it was years ago I was taught so maybe things have changed or my memory worsened (and I'm wrong).

Ian
Apparently it's pretty much inevitable that a rib will break - and that you will feel it.

Only time my instructor had *not* broken a rib was when the patient was concious (he'd been sent into vfib by a mains shock)

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

1 September 2014 - 3:26pm
gaz wrote:I hope the rider makes a full and swift recovery.

Has anyone completed an incident report form?

If I were on a club run I'd like to think the leader may have a First Aid kit, I don't think I'd go so far as to say I'd expect them to have one or be trained to use it. As to carrying a defibrillator...

I'm always a bit sceptical on "carrying a.first aid kit". If it's bad enough that you can't do without or improvise -will anything realistically feasible for a first aid kit help? eg defibrillator - spinal splint, leg splint, real drugs like morphine etc. If a sticky plaster or even triangular bandage is gonna help, I suggest you can do without. And if cycling in a group (give there'a "leader" who's expected to have a first aid kit) can't someone cycle off to the nearest house assuming no mobile phone coverage. Knowing a bit of first aid -fair enough - and if I'm hillwalking I tend to carry rather more - but things like electrical tape, folding "sam splint" to cover fractures, and anyway have walking sticks & bivi bag. But just for a bike ride, no

Re: 2 LeJog deaths: Death by dangerous driving charge

1 September 2014 - 3:06pm
It's just a sign of how the system is creaking at the seams. For all sorts of reasons, cases are taking longer to come to trial in the Crown Court and that's in no-one's interest. In spite of bail being given in cases where it would once have been considered unthinkable, the number of prisoners waiting months (ie in custody) for their case to be heard is leading to overcrowding and all the problems that creates. OTOH, long bail periods give the opportunity for further offending and witnesses can be intimidated or get cold feet.

Too many vested interests to do much about it, I fear, but the current Lord High Whatisname (Grayling?) seems to be intent on starving out the lawyers, rather than tackling them head on.

Re: 3rd time unlucky

1 September 2014 - 3:04pm
just use puncture proof tyres and tubes;i havent had a puncture for years using these.

Re: 2 LeJog deaths: Death by dangerous driving charge

1 September 2014 - 2:40pm
thirdcrank wrote:A year to get to court and in the meantime, a further serious offence has been committed, but nobody in authority seems to find this unacceptable or even worthy of comment.

Well his solicitor even exploited it by saying in his client's mitigation "that he had no previous convictions."

Re: 2 LeJog deaths: Death by dangerous driving charge

1 September 2014 - 2:25pm
Interesting point of British law there, but he was actually found guilty and sentenced to 7.5 years for each of the deaths, but British law has these running concurrently.

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

1 September 2014 - 2:25pm
On the CPR and doing it properly; it's many years since I was taught (on several courses) and I've never had to do it for real, but often when you see it being done on TV it's feeble and misleading. From my memory, it's meant to be done fairly hard (one course mentioned you might break a rib on your patient but better that and they live). And of course you can't do it on a person who does not need it. So when people keep seeing dainty little gentle presses (the "patient" would probably not even be aware of), I wonder if this is mis-directing the general public.

That said, it was years ago I was taught so maybe things have changed or my memory worsened (and I'm wrong).

Ian

Re: Any ideas?

1 September 2014 - 2:24pm
Phil,

I find that signalling with my right upper arm out horizontally and the forearm & hand vertically downwards generally conveys the clear message "Pass me at a safe distance."

It is obviously not a turn right signal.

Most motorists respond well : a few clowns shout or otherwise (deliberately) misunderstand. You will never stop the punishment passes, alas.

I suspect that a mechanical device for space-marking will be impractical.

If I had an ongoing problem, like yours, I would be getting one or more cameras and fluro waistcoat reading "On Video".

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