CTC Forum - On the road

Syndicate content
Discussion boards hosted by CTC, the national cycling charity
Updated: 1 hour 16 min ago

Re: The bicycle: good enough?

9 hours 36 min ago
reohn2 wrote: But at least it's got disc brakes ....

er, shouldn't that read

reohn2 wrote: But at least it's got discs ....

call me a cynical get but I reckon there are no calipers....

cheers

Re: Helmet Cams Are Inflaming Road rage

9 hours 40 min ago
Why are we talking about smoke alarms in a debate about helmet cams?

Vorpal wrote:As for helmet cams.... Like everything else drivers with dash cams are 'just protecting themselves' agaisnt claims, etc. but the same camera somehow transforms a cyclist into an aggressive maniac?
But it doesn't! It makes some cyclists into aggressive maniacs - not all of them. The problem being is that as more and more videos make their way into the public domain where a motorist has made a mistake and a cyclist goes out of their way to belittle them then the public will start t think that all helmet cam cyclists act that way, and then that all cyclists act that way.

Cameras have their use. Someone does something dangerous and the evidence can be supplied to the police and some form of education can be given and maybe some punishment. Whether this happens, we are not to know - I've heard some people say that it has happened and some say it hasn't.

However, what I see on the majority of these videos is a cyclist going out of their way to say that they are better than someone else. Yes, the driver made a mistake but is there a need to chase them down, wind them up to a state that they start making fools of themselves and then put that online? The 'Clown takes a pratfall' video comes to mind a lot in this mindset of winding up motorists. Yes, that fella in the Peugeot was a first class idiot but the cyclist knew after he had his first verbal encounter with him that the motorist was not going to back down. Why not be a bigger man and just forget about it there and then - you've made your point but it hasn't sunk in. Is there a need to goad the man so that he makes a fool of himself and then let the whole world see? What if that man had some past that the press got hold of that they turned against the holder of the video camera? Suppose the press make out he was a war hero from the first Iraq war who had suffered from psychological issues and anger problems - but had got over these through therapy and then this cyclist comes along and winds him up. It doesn't even have to be that true - once the press get hold of a tiny smell of a better story that will sell their papers then they will and mud will stick.

I get some close passes occasionally. I get motorists cutting in on me - usually I make a type of gesture of "wtf was that all about?" Not any aggression towards the other driver. Sometimes after doing this the next driver that passes me will make a gesture at me in the tone of "Blummin' heck, that was close". In my mind, whilst the first motorist got away with it - but maybe he saw my gesture, the second motorist thought about things and he/she will give just that little bit extra thought around cyclists. Cloud cuckoo land - maybe. But going out of one's way to humiliate people or have heated arguments is bad for cyclists in general.

Re: Helmet Cams Are Inflaming Road rage

10 hours 31 min ago
karlt wrote:irc wrote:[XAP]Bob wrote:You just have to hope the battery doesn't fail prematurely - which could leave it without the power to beep.

Also check the date on the alpha source...

I rely on burning toast once or twice a year to ensure it still works.

Sausages. It's almost impossible to grill sausages without setting off what we now refer to as the sausage alarm.
Maybe I should burn more stuff cooking...

Actually, I go around and replace all the batteries in the smoke alarms once per year, then use those batteries in less critical stuff, like toys. I also test them (using the little 'test' button) after I've installed the new batteries.

As for helmet cams.... Like everything else drivers with dash cams are 'just protecting themselves' agaisnt claims, etc. but the same camera somehow transforms a cyclist into an aggressive maniac?

Re: Helmet Cams Are Inflaming Road rage

10 hours 38 min ago
Lance Dopestrong wrote:
At best a camera is good for a bit of legal retribution after the event. It does nothing whatsoever to actually make you any safer.

The law doesn't allow retribution - only that you should be at least no worse off as consequence of someone else's negligence. So if the law is on your side it's useful to have evidence to back it up in the face of the inevitable denial.

And as motorists become aware that they can't run in to you with impunity they're likely to take more care, which in turn does make you safer.

Re: Helmet Cams Are Inflaming Road rage

11 hours 44 min ago
irc wrote:[XAP]Bob wrote:irc wrote:
Don't need to. It goes from silent to giving single beeps when the battery gets low.

You just have to hope the battery doesn't fail prematurely - which could leave it without the power to beep.

Also check the date on the alpha source...

I rely on burning toast once or twice a year to ensure it still works.

Sausages. It's almost impossible to grill sausages without setting off what we now refer to as the sausage alarm.

Re: The folder revelation and results so far

21 hours 31 min ago
SSCN4861.JPG

I use a folder for most of my riding. I live a ten minute walk from work so my bike is ridden purely for pleasure. I got a folder because my work pattern is unpredictable and I found that I was riding over the same routes. Putting the folder in the car and driving to distant start points enabled me to explore new roads.

The bike (Xootr Swift) only has 8 gears but I find that to be more than enough. I fitted a smaller chainwheel to lower the gearing and 'bar ends that change the flat 'bars into drops. The 20" wheels roll well and I have no problem riding 35 to 40 miles at a time (hills permitting!).

When I remember the old single speed bikes I had as a boy and the distances I covered on them I am sometimes ashamed at how fewer miles I ride on better bikes!

Folders are great and can be used for most types of leisure riding. My Xootr is my first choice when planning a ride.

SSCN5014.JPG

As you can see from the photos, I like to change things on it. The Xootr takes standard parts (except the seat post and stem riser) so I can customise it 'till my heart's content.

Re: The bicycle: good enough?

31 August 2015 - 11:38pm
The DF bicycle developed quickly from the Hobby horse and hasn't changed fundamentally other than (significant) incremental tweaks and ongoing refinements,but the basic bicycle is still there.
It's ability to instil freedom in the individual for the their energy input is unsurpassed.

Beautiful it is,and most definitely 'good enough' .

Re: The bicycle: good enough?

31 August 2015 - 11:23pm
Brucey wrote:mill4six wrote:This might be quite speedy.

https://www.facebook.com/43033336703362 ... =1&theater



blimey....

More style than substance IMHO.... a tail fairing would net at least as much gain without knackering the steering so much(think of the windage torque on the bars!!!!)...

The wheel fairing panel gaps are too tight at the front of the machine; on a bumpy road the steering will bind.

The gearing isn't going to be any good for going fast with, not with that size chainring.

You can't go up hills either, because there is no small ring, and you can't fit a small ring because the frame was designed by a twit, so that the chain will foul the chainstay....

As if further evidence of the muddled thought involved were needed, you can see that they thought that the handlebar had to be 'aero' even behind the windscreen, for some reason....

cheers

But at least it's got disc brakes

It's a MAMIL's machine if ever I saw one,now where's the engine?

Re: The bicycle: good enough?

31 August 2015 - 9:57pm
mill4six wrote:This might be quite speedy.

https://www.facebook.com/43033336703362 ... =1&theater



blimey....

More style than substance IMHO.... a tail fairing would net at least as much gain without knackering the steering so much(think of the windage torque on the bars!!!!)...

The wheel fairing panel gaps are too tight at the front of the machine; on a bumpy road the steering will bind.

The gearing isn't going to be any good for going fast with, not with that size chainring.

You can't go up hills either, because there is no small ring, and you can't fit a small ring because the frame was designed by a twit, so that the chain will foul the chainstay....

As if further evidence of the muddled thought involved were needed, you can see that they thought that the handlebar had to be 'aero' even behind the windscreen, for some reason....

cheers

Re: Pre-ride (or pre-drive) checks.

31 August 2015 - 8:37pm
other kinds of settling can cause the bulk of 'apparent stretch' but in fact, all cables do stretch;

1) elastically (reversibly) when under load, and
2) permanently (not reversibly) typically the first time they see a high load, due to settling of the strands in the structure of the cable.

To combat 2), cables usually come 'pre-stretched'. This doesn't make them immune to settling stretch but it does greatly reduce it, down to perhaps 1% or so settling once installed. However bicycle cables are also fitted in curves, and cables that see a high load in a curve will settle (stretch) a little when they see the high load for the first time. [You can tell that this is happening because the cable will be a different shape when removed, once it has seen a little service. If it is removed without seeing a high load. it'll be just the same shape as when it went in.]

cheers

Re: Pre-ride (or pre-drive) checks.

31 August 2015 - 8:24pm
At risk of starting that debate all over again, brake cables do not and never have stretched. Pads wear, outers can compress fractionally and settle into the stops, but they do not stretch.

Re: Helmet Cams Are Inflaming Road rage

31 August 2015 - 8:20pm
The helmet cam footage is usually interesting. Of the head mounted cams, see how many cyclists actually don't bother looking left or right or even behind them how many turn or pull from the gutter to primary without shoulder checking. A lot of even the conscientious and otherwise sensible riders exhibit quite poor road craft

Then there are the camera vigilantes, the small but massively high profile minority who give every one else bad name.

I don't use a camera, and rely on riding safely, anticipating the world around me, and actually looking around me now and again and don't seem to get into the scrapes that these camera boys do.

At best a camera is good for a bit of legal retribution after the event. It does nothing whatsoever to actually make you any safer.

Re: The bicycle: good enough?

31 August 2015 - 8:11pm
the dream of a fully enclosed bike is wonderful, but the reality is that every machine with a hard fairing I have ever seen or tried has been really noisy; a bit like being inside a dustbin whilst people are hitting it with something.

TBH I'm not quite sure I could stick that noise level all the time; to me it is just as intrusive as (say) the noise of riding on the rollers, which I hate. I quite like peace and quiet when I go out on my bike and I'm not sure I'd have it in any fully faired machine; maybe one with a fabric fairing would get 90% of the benefit without the noise?

BTW new materials might in the future reduce the weight of a robust bicycle significantly. However if a town bike went from (say) 15kg down to 10kg, this isn't that big a deal, not when you figure that bike plus rider plus luggage is liable to be 80-110kg for most adults on a commute.

cheers

Re: The bicycle: good enough?

31 August 2015 - 8:02pm
beardy wrote:A monocoque moulded plastic bike, enclosing rider (and chain) while also providing an aerodynamic envelope would be quite a noticeable improvement and it could be left out in the rain alongside your car.Er, a bit like one of these? (IMO the 3rd wheel is needed for lateral stability with all that area exposed to side winds, and it's not a monocoque - don't think the price / weight / stiffness combination is there yet.)

Re: Helmet Cams Are Inflaming Road rage

31 August 2015 - 7:35pm
[XAP]Bob wrote:irc wrote:maxcherry wrote: NO NO NO!

Please check your batteries and give it regular tests. Wouldn't want to see any harm coming to the bikes......or you.

Don't need to. It goes from silent to giving single beeps when the battery gets low.

You just have to hope the battery doesn't fail prematurely - which could leave it without the power to beep.

Also check the date on the alpha source...

I rely on burning toast once or twice a year to ensure it still works.

Re: The bicycle: good enough?

31 August 2015 - 7:03pm
Thinking about what is wrong with cycling may lead to ideas to improve it.

The tedious chain (and other) maintenance, exposure to the elements and wind resistance are three that come to mind.

A monocoque moulded plastic bike, enclosing rider (and chain) while also providing an aerodynamic envelope would be quite a noticeable improvement and it could be left out in the rain alongside your car.

There is already development towards some power assist up the hills.

Re: The bicycle: good enough?

31 August 2015 - 6:57pm
GeoffBrassn wrote:The bike is a good enough genre, pleasingly immune to mass production, unhappily prone to mass-compromise.

It can be mass produced but someone still has to pedal it.

Re: The bicycle: good enough?

31 August 2015 - 6:56pm
mercalia wrote:well an advance would be much lighter materials that dont have the issues of alloy or carbon but more like steel?

True, but then what? The weight of a 10 kg bike isn't that significant compared to the weight of the rider up hill and air resistance down hill. There are lots of interesting developments and improvements that can be made but the bike is still the bike.

Re: The bicycle: good enough?

31 August 2015 - 5:55pm
well an advance would be much lighter materials that dont have the issues of alloy or carbon but more like steel?

Archive

  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541

Copyright © CTC 2015

Terms and Conditions