CTC Forum - On the road

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Updated: 2 hours 20 min ago

Re: Why do so many people die shovelling snow?

2 hours 26 min ago
Going out in the cold to shovel snow or cycle is equivalent to doing a "cold pressor test" - a medical test in which a hand is immersed in cold water. The test causes changes in blood pressure and heart rate and causes a number of physiological changes related to the heart. It can be a predictor of cardiac problems. So it's not surprising that going out and getting cold limbs while taking vigorous exercise by those who are usually sedentary picks off some of those with undiagnosed coronary problems

There is another factor...

2 hours 56 min ago
People talk about cardio or cardio fitness. What the vast majority of people don't realise is that the fitness is in the muscles specific to the exercise. A concert pianist has extremely fit small arm and hand muscles, a runner has to have upper and lower leg muscles very fit, a cyclist has to have the quads, esp. the vastus medialis.
You put an extremely fit cyclist who can swim well, but doesn't, into a pool and he will be gasping in no time.
You can be fit enough walking or running, but unless you use your shovelling muscles regularly, you are going to be gasping with a very high pulse in no time.

Re: The Great British Cyling quiz

3 hours 54 min ago
Bicycler wrote:If something is worth doing it's worth doing well. If their wording can trip up people who know the law no doubt it can confuse those who don't. I also think it would be best for them not to offer sloppy legal advice for free if they want to attract paying clients.

They managed to catch out a few cyclists who think they know the law about ASL. First you must cross the stop line to get to the Advanced stop line.
The exact legal entry point was not asked for.

This quiz highlights why we are better off with proper legal representation when things end up in court. In law the exact wording is every thing an it is easy o trip people up.

Re: The Great British Cyling quiz

10 hours 36 min ago
100 % first time.

Re: I Hate Virgin Trains

22 November 2014 - 10:27pm
Bicycler wrote:I wasn't attempting to justify subsidy (though I can think of far worse things to subsidise) just pointing out that subsidising does affect the cost as far as the individual customer is concerned.

Maybe but it's still costing them much more than the ticket price would suggest. And the bigger the subsidy the larger the hidden cost to the user is.

Re: Skateboarders v cyclists..amazing footage

22 November 2014 - 10:21pm
Just a pair of knuckle draggers

Re: I Hate Virgin Trains

22 November 2014 - 10:12pm
I wasn't attempting to justify subsidy (though I can think of far worse things to subsidise) just pointing out that subsidising does affect the cost as far as the individual customer is concerned.

Re: I Hate Virgin Trains

22 November 2014 - 9:56pm
Bicycler wrote:TonyR wrote:iviehoff wrote:One of the reasons that trains are cheaper in other countries is that they subsidise them more comprehensively.

Which means they only give the illusion of being cheaper. The subsidies come from the taxes people pay so they are paying an additional indirect cost on top of the visible direct cost
But that additional cost is met by all the relevant tax payers rather than falling on the individuals using the service.

Yes, so you and I are subsidising the fares of London commuters. And the rationale for that is?

Re: Weekend Rides

22 November 2014 - 9:29pm
Almost makes me want to move back to north Manchester where I come from.

I've done the lanes of Cheshire to death from my current south Manchester home.

The trek over Warburton bridge, up through Leigh and past Bolton to access the moors is a bit too long at this time of year.

Re: Weekend Rides

22 November 2014 - 9:27pm
Rain didn't discourage 18, including 3 first timers, coming out for our 22 mile Easyride this morning.

Split into 3 groups, kept in the lanes and met lots of very courteous oncoming motorists who stooped whilst we passed and overtaking ones who held back until they could pass safe and wide with just one exception

Re: Speeding cyclists on LBC now

22 November 2014 - 9:21pm
kwackers wrote:When I took my motorcycle test one of the things was to ride it at the side of the instructor as he slowly walked along. Then you had to do a U turn without putting a foot down.
I seem to think they were both quite hard. I reckon the fat tyres on the motorbike actually made balancing at slow speeds harder due to the rather sedate steering.

When I learnt to ride a motorbike I was quite disappointed in how long it took me. I was already a motorist of ten years' experience and a cyclist for as long as I can remember. I expected to be able to handle a motorbike in minutes but it wasn't the case.

The only part of my week long course where I genuinely shined was in the slow-control module; weaving around cones in a car park. The instructor, seeing I was handy at it, jumped in front of me on his bike to teach me a lesson and we continued to do super slow figure eights around the circuit until one of us put a foot down. Years of doing track stands at London traffic lights came in useful: I won.

Re: The Great British Cyling quiz

22 November 2014 - 8:52pm
Bicycler wrote:If something is worth doing it's worth doing well. If their wording can trip up people who know the law no doubt it can confuse those who don't...
By which measure the Highway Code itself falls short.

Hopefully a few of those who got some answers wrong (according to the quizmasters) might look for a bit of further guidance. I'd expect it's more likely that they'll look to refresh their knowledge of the Highway Code than to investigate the minutiae of the Highways Act 1835 or the Road Vehicle Lighting Regualtions 1989 and it's subsequent amendments. With a bit of luck by the time they've found the sections relevant to the answers they will have refreshed their knowledge in other areas along the way.

Bicycler wrote:BTW I liked this gem:

amber pedal reflectors also need fitting if a bike is manufactured before October 1st, 1985.
Yes, that is without doubt a bit of a howler.

Re: Skateboarders v cyclists..amazing footage

22 November 2014 - 8:44pm
My first thoughts too, but followed a link a found what appears to be chase car in this video at 3:25

Re: The Great British Cyling quiz

22 November 2014 - 8:30pm
If something is worth doing it's worth doing well. If their wording can trip up people who know the law no doubt it can confuse those who don't. I also think it would be best for them not to offer sloppy legal advice for free if they want to attract paying clients.

That and I didn't like the rather judgemental way in which some of the answers were worded:
Contrary to popular belief, it is against the law to ride a bike along the pavement (The Highway Code, section 64). While most cyclists will have taken the option on at least one occasion – and it does not seem to be particularly policed – it underlines the importance of pedestrian safety on these walkways.

On top of this, rightly-coloured clothing is also still only a "should", not a must.

While more careless cyclists may give the impression that they are able to take more liberties than other road users, the Highway Code is clear: cyclists must adhere to the exact same rules as everyone else.

BTW I liked this gem:

amber pedal reflectors also need fitting if a bike is manufactured before October 1st, 1985.
Get them fitted Bob!

Re: I Hate Virgin Trains

22 November 2014 - 8:23pm
TonyR wrote:Or the Greek national railways. Running costs of €1Bn, ticket sales of €100m and even the cleaners got paid c€60k p.a. And they wonder why the country went bust.
The Greek railways are an extreme case, and quite a few of the more ridiculous lines have been forced to close of late. They did build some beautiful new lines around Athens recently, though a city the size of and density of Athens probably needed those.

Re: The Great British Cyling quiz

22 November 2014 - 8:18pm
I noticed that the web address is that of a solicitors, I think?

Re: The Great British Cyling quiz

22 November 2014 - 8:14pm
It seems to me that the quiz was written from the point of view that those most likely to take the quiz would be unlikely to have a knoweldge of road traffic law above that gleaned from the Highway Code. Equally it was not intended to educate anyone above the level of knowledge to be gained from studying a handful of entries within the Highway Code.

Re: The Great British Cyling quiz

22 November 2014 - 8:08pm
Thanks for the link to the detailed answers, they certainly add some information to the answers in the quiz. It is a shame that they were not included within the quiz. That said, they don't clarify some of the answers which members of this forum have found confusing.

That excerpt from the highway code actually illustrates the point I was making. It states that it is illegal to cycle on pavements without defining the term pavement. The legislation cited to support the statement is the one I quoted above which does not use the term pavement so there is no clear statutory definition. It is marginally more acceptable in the HC than in the quiz because the HC includes a section on cycle tracks in rule 62 where it is made clear that "pavement" is used to mean only those paths for the exclusive use of pedestrians. Motorists relying on the quiz (or the HC rule in isolation) could have reinforced their mistaken view that all the cyclists they see on the paths beside roads are riding illegally

Re: The Great British Cyling quiz

22 November 2014 - 7:49pm
Bicycler wrote:[mounts hobby horse] Neither "pavement" nor the modern highway jargon "footway" appear in the legislation prohibiting cycling on them. The wording is "any footpath or causeway by the side of any road made or set apart for the use or accommodation of foot passengers" [dismounts hobby horse]

64
You MUST NOT cycle on a pavement.
Laws HA 1835 sect 72 & R(S)A 1984, sect 129

So I hope you didn't mount your hobby horse whilst on the pavement or you could be in trouble .

Most of the official answers reference the Highway Code, some even reference the CTC.

Re: I Hate Virgin Trains

22 November 2014 - 6:49pm
Or the Greek national railways. Running costs of €1Bn, ticket sales of €100m and even the cleaners got paid c€60k p.a. And they wonder why the country went bust.

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