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Updated: 46 min 37 sec ago

Re: Rhine cycle path

14 July 2014 - 1:37pm
Yes there are some long stretches on dedicated paths. Surfaces are good. usually tarmac or compact gravel and they are well signposted. They can be a bit dull so you might want to pass through a few villages.

Re: Rhine cycle path

14 July 2014 - 1:20pm
I would say from my experience, that the largest part of the Rhein Radweg is on dedicated riverbank trails - often on both banks. Some areas - east of Basel for example do rely more heavily on roads although i've never found this to be any great issue, there usually being a dedicated bike lane for you to use.

Some sections - Bonn to Koblenz for example can be pretty busy with walkers and cyclists particularly at weekends.

Re: Cycle touring coincidences

14 July 2014 - 11:52am
I rode the Great Divide going North to South in 2003, it is quite remote with lots of lumpy bits and you very rarely see other cyclists.

Quite a way into the ride when the group had diminished from 14 to 7 of us we were all riding within a mile or so of each other as we had decided to stop at the highest point on the ride at something like 12,500 ft for photos (as you do).

Within 10 minutes of us all arriving several more cyclist turned up and within about half an hour there were 17 of us. Some we knew as they were leapfrogging us but the rest of them were in two groups going South to North.

Needless to say we had a bit of a party with our new found friends. We swapped route details, emails and took photos of people we didn't know. It has always stuck in my mind as one of those experiences. How on earth did we all make it to the highest point on the same day at the same time, very surreal.

Rhine cycle path

14 July 2014 - 11:49am
I’m thinking about a ride up the Rhine, and looking at the map, it seems that:
On the lower part, up as far perhaps as Bonn, the route mostly follows minor roads at a certain distance from the river;
Above there it’s mostly on dedicated cycle tracks adjacent to the river.
Is that correct?
Any views on the relative merits/demerits of the two styles?
I assume that where it’s on cycle tracks, navigation will be a doddle. Are the other parts well signposted?

Re: Cycling to Nordkapp: searching for suggestions

14 July 2014 - 10:16am
Vorpal wrote:yes

thanks a lot. travelling is always problematic for the electricity, we are in EU but there is still no standard.

Re: Tyre pressure.

14 July 2014 - 10:14am
Thanks all for your replies. I had rode 300miles since fitting the tyre and tube, but only a couple of miles since putting a bit more air in it. On closer inspection I can see that there’s wear on a small section of the rim of the tyre. I’m guessing that part of the tyre rim popped out and that led to my problems. Like the previous post says, I’ll need to check for that each time I inflate my tyres, but probably won’t.

Cheers all.

Re: Cycle touring coincidences

14 July 2014 - 8:59am
The bottom two sections of my D-Day beaches ride post in 2010 tells the story (so I won't spoil it) and all through the medium of the CTC Forum!

viewtopic.php?f=16&t=38629

Re: Cycle touring coincidences

14 July 2014 - 6:27am
axel_knutt wrote:"You know, the most amazing thing happened to me tonight. I was coming here, on the way to the lecture, and I came in through the parking lot. And you won't believe what happened. I saw a car with the license plate ARW 357. Can you imagine? Of all the millions of license plates in the state, what was the chance I would see that particular one tonight? Amazing!"

Richard Feynman

Very good. I like this one. This nails it.

Re: Cycle touring coincidences

14 July 2014 - 12:21am
I was doing the Yorkshire Dales Cycle Way alone, and struggling up the very quiet, remote Coverdale. The only place I could find to stop and hope for food was the tiny pub in Horsehouse (bar about the size of a small living room). I opened the door and came to face with my village postman as he was leaving, on a walking holiday. There were no other people there and I stayed for a bowl of soup for half an hour.

Re: On the road one year.

13 July 2014 - 11:27pm
I sometimes question my mental capacity. It's not the long days in the saddle but the absence of home comforts that might do it for me. I guess you can only test yourself and see how it goes but like many cycle tourers I have had my fair share of days where I find myself muttering "this is supposed to be fun"!). I notice that whilst I really enjoy travelling by myself and really like camping too much of both of these together can be a bad combination for me.
Thanks for your kind words. I agree that too much of a good thing can be bad. We have found ourselves going through some beautiful areas and not really enjoying things because we have been trying to do too much. You can't see everything on your way through a country and if conditions are bad we try and take a break.
We have learned to take things at face value as well, you hear negative things about some countries which are mostly unfounded. One of the beauties of cycling is that you are never seen as a threat, we have found people to be very open and kind to us. Particularly in central Asia where conditions are generally harsher it is the friendliness of the local people that can keep you going. So start planning that long trip.

Re: On the road one year.

13 July 2014 - 9:26pm
I've been really enjoying your posts and catching up on some of your blog/journal. It is SO impressive. I think I would like to cycle a fair chunk of the world one day but the Central Asia thing doesn't really appeal ( although Georgia and the other European bits I'm totally sold on as they play to my preference for beauty plus a bit more ease of travelling.)

My personal retirement plan has always been to cycle Alaska to terra del fuego. I have no idea how doable it it but it really appeals. Before then I have plenty of plans with the Baltic cycle route always in the back of my mind for a long summer break from work (if I get made redundant ever please let it be in April!) and kids and stuff. Plus New Zealand, and many of the other popular destinations. For some reason in my imagination I'm often cycling in India but I don't know why as it isn't at the top of my destination list at all!

I do have a question for myself though ( and this is the question you have already tested yourselves on so bravo). I know that I am physically capable of cycling long distances. I sometimes question my mental capacity. It's not the long days in the saddle but the absence of home comforts that might do it for me. I guess you can only test yourself and see how it goes but like many cycle tourers I have had my fair share of days where I find myself muttering "this is supposed to be fun"!). I notice that whilst I really enjoy travelling by myself and really like camping too much of both of these together can be a bad combination for me. The reason I think it is just a case of management rather than a huge deal is because My husband wants to sail the world and I suspect that I would really crack on a transatlantic crossing, in a totally different way compared to the odd lack of enthusiasm when cycling, due to the constraints of living on a small boat. At least with my bike I have the freedom to go anywhere and I find that fabulous.

On the road one year.

13 July 2014 - 8:43pm
Last month we celebrated one year on the road in Tashkent Uzbekistan. We have travelled through 19 countries clocking up 11,000km, we weren't sure what it would be like being tour for so long but it is GREAT! Anyone else out there planning to sell everything and go touring? www.cycling-nomads.com

Re: Cycling to Nordkapp: searching for suggestions

13 July 2014 - 7:55pm
serbring wrote:pal wrote:which electricity plugin is there in norway?

It's the same as the rest of continental Europe (two pin sockets).

This one?

http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_e ... roplug.png

thanks
yes

Re: Cycling to Nordkapp: searching for suggestions

13 July 2014 - 7:49pm
pal wrote:which electricity plugin is there in norway?

It's the same as the rest of continental Europe (two pin sockets).

This one?

http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_e ... roplug.png

thanks

Re: Cycle touring coincidences

13 July 2014 - 6:57pm
When I lived in Japan my sister decided to visit from Seattle. The day after she arrived we were leaving our apartment when we bumped into our next door neighbour who had her brother visiting from New York. My sister and her brother instantly recognised each other. They had sat next to each other on the flight which had gone from New York via Seattle to Tokyo.

Re: Cycle touring coincidences

13 July 2014 - 6:16pm
Not a cycling one but a few years ago I was on Holiday in Grindelwald, Switzerland and bumped into my Nephew and family who had decided to go camping there. At the same time my cousins who live at the other end of England to me were holidaying in Wengen just the other side of the hill.

Cycling in Ireland?

13 July 2014 - 6:12pm
I haven't been there for several years, usually took the families bikes in the minibus and cycled locally.
I would, personally, avoid the tourist routes, most notably, the 'Ring of Kerry', but even then there are some nice rides there, like Killorglin to Waterville up the centreline of the peninsula, then around Bolus Head and Valencia, etc..
My favourite is Dingle, west beyond Dingle and also over the Chonair Pass to Brandon. There is also a lovely little pass over the hills to the west of the waterfall on the Chonair Pass to the South west of Brandon (Saints way?) that is slate and mountain bike territory, but OK for half an hours pushing uphill on a tourer over the top part. You won't see another soul between the road on the west side of Ballysiteragh (that the pass is just north of) and Cloghane.

I always found food expensive, especially in restaurants and 'gastro pubs'. Only disappointment was the average small pub to whom a cheese sandwich was a precut slice of cheddar from a pack on white sliced bread (the 'doorstep' with thick cut cheese seemed unheard of). Ham was usually the processed micron thick variety. Take plenty of money....

I have a friend who regularly cycled around west Ireland after season in September (I always went in school hols), his experience was mainly dry. It seems that July and August you take chances with weather.
The people are very friendly and usually say hello as you cycle past.
The terrain is quite hilly for the most part, but with that comes the views.
Enjoy it, you will probably want to go back too.

Andy Short.

Re: Cycle touring coincidences

13 July 2014 - 5:50pm
"You know, the most amazing thing happened to me tonight. I was coming here, on the way to the lecture, and I came in through the parking lot. And you won't believe what happened. I saw a car with the license plate ARW 357. Can you imagine? Of all the millions of license plates in the state, what was the chance I would see that particular one tonight? Amazing!"

Richard Feynman

Re: Cycle touring coincidences

13 July 2014 - 5:19pm
The chances of winning the UK national lottery standard draw are about 1 in 14,000,000. 1 in 14,000,000, how could it happen, we would say of many things. But in the case of the lottery, we are well aware that millions of tickets are sold each week, so we are unsurprised about regular winners.

How many people do you know well enough that to bump into them in a remote place would be a coincidence - 500? So you happened to bump into one of the 50 people from your office, but you might also have remarked on someone from your tennis club or one of the waitresses at the coffee shop you go to, etc. Since I commented on someone who knew my sister and someone who lived next door to my aunt, 500 might even be rather on the low side. So there are about 65,000,000 people in the country, so when you randomly bump into someone, that they are someone you know is already down to only about 100,000. How long does it take before you pass 100,000 people? I pass thousands a day on my journey to work. Then there's the fact that communities tend to follow similar routes. When I bumped into the same person in a town in north India and later in a hostel in New Zealand, these were both the kind of place where a particular kind of tourist is likely to go, thus greatly narrowing down the possibility.

Clearly "coincidence" is such a vague and broad concept it is hard to do science on it. But a great many weird things are remarked upon, and if they are sufficiently well defined it can often be shown that the occurrence was in fact likely, or not so very unlikely as not to occur from time to time. Many analyses of this nature have been performed.

Humans have not been designed to be naturally skilled at making statistical judgments. It is easy to fool us with apparent statistical paradoxes. This much has been consistently shown by experiment.

Re: Cycle touring coincidences

13 July 2014 - 4:49pm
iviehoff wrote:The thing about coincidences is that there are so many potential coincidences, it would be surprising if they didn't from time to time occur. The ones OP cites don't seem particularly strong. That is often given as an explanation, but has anyone ever studied it? Does meeting a friend on a mountain summit occur more frequently than it ought to, for example?
I once heard on the radio of a synchronicity where a man had broken down in village tens of miles from home. He was near a phone booth, when the phone rang, he picked it up and it was his wife wanting to know something. She was unaware that she had misdialled.

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