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Updated: 2 hours 27 min ago

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

18 October 2014 - 1:49pm
We had a dark green Peugeot 205 for some years, and when we bought it, I instantly noticed that we weren't so well seen as we had been in our previous (bright red) car. For all the years we owned it, I was constantly aware how we blended in.

Why they produce cars in poor colours I don't know. I do wonder if there are any figures and statistics re accidents of dull colours vs bright ones.

Black cat is curled up on the hearth-rug, one black and white one is asleep in a cardboard box in the spare room, and the other one is out somewhere ............. trying to be invisible.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

18 October 2014 - 1:39pm
Mick F wrote:We have three cats.
Two are black and white, and one is completely black.

It's the black and white ones that we can see very easily, but the black one seems to disappear into any background.

But is it actively trying to stay in places where it can be seen, following rules that govern traffic flow? If our cat is anything to go by, probably not.

Otherwise, ask why insurance companies do not charge a special extra premium for black cars, since people must be driving in to them unawares all the time...

Pete.

Re: Poncho

18 October 2014 - 1:21pm
Army surplus store - We have this physical store in Burton on Trent,
but they also do on line.
I've no affiliation or link with them but some of their prices seem pretty good to me
http://www.springfields.co.uk/catalogse ... /?q=poncho

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

18 October 2014 - 1:10pm
One thing I've noticed when it comes to hi-vis on narrow lanes is: Horse riders always wear hi-vis, dog walkers mostly wear hi-vis (sometimes even the dogs), cyclists mostly wear hi-vis, mothers pushing buggies never wear hi-vis.

I'd be interested to know the casualty data for mothers pushing buggies on narrow country lanes; 'cos I was very surprised when I became aware of the pattern.

Ian

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

18 October 2014 - 1:04pm
We have three cats.
Two are black and white, and one is completely black.

It's the black and white ones that we can see very easily, but the black one seems to disappear into any background.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

18 October 2014 - 12:14pm
tim-b wrote:
If you subscribe to the contrast theory then what is the correct colour for greatest vis on a longer ride...oilseed rape fields, followed by a built-up area, followed by a shady "tree tunnel"?

It's not a case of "correct colour", it's a case of realising that you're playing a losing game trying to second guess the scenery, and the visual acuity of the neighbourhood's drivers.

tim-b wrote:If drivers don't look far enough ahead, drive too quickly for their view, or just don't think, then potentially it's game over regardless of colour / lighting

Quite so.

anniesboy wrote:It seems to me to be ridiculous that much cycle clothing is black, I call it the new yellow.

The Highway Code rule 59 says cyclists should wear...

And if you look at THC closer it tells you pedestrians should be wearing pretty much the same thing (helmet excepted), yet nobody seems to bother and that isn't actually a problem (perceived or actual). And if you look at Cyclecraft it will point out that when it comes to cycling advice the Highway Code isn't actually that sharp.

anniesboy wrote:There should be no doubt that anyone unfortunate enough to be involved in any incident and not wearing appropriate clothing does so at their risk /choice.

It's clear that any cycling you do, whatever you do it in, is at your own risk. You do need to careful about banging on too much about "appropriate clothes" though, because you end up straying in to Victim Blaming territory remarkably easily. As noted, THC stresses the importance of bright/reflective clothing for pedestrians, so next thing we know someone running over children near ice cream vans is absolved because the sprog was in his Batman costume.

Mick F wrote:Spinners wrote:I just think there's more chance of a cyclist being seen by wearing brighter colours. That's all.+1

That I ride around most typically in bright (but not fluo) colours suggests that at least a part of me agrees, and I doubt there'll be much/any active disadvantage (including hi-viz) to getting seen in the overall grand scheme of things.

However, one needs to remember the risk compensation issue and always ride as if they're in DPM, and it's important to realise that people in Normal Clothes (my normal clothes are bright, but lots of folk have black ones) are actually entirely visible on the road to anyone bothering to look if they are in a position they can be seen.

When I'm teaching kids Bikeability I bring out a student in a dayglo vest, having divested myself of anything bright. I ask which of us is easiest to see. Everyone says it's the student. Then I stand in front of the student, and ask again, and it's me. And none of them have any trouble seeing me without hi-viz, even if I'd stick out even more in hi-viz. It also makes the students (hopefully) aware that even drivers looking out for them can't see them around corners, or in blind spots etc., so the "I'm lit up like a Christmas Tree, everyone can see me!" feeling doesn't take root.

More is not always better, if enough is enough. And I don't want to put off people who really don't want to ride if they have to dress up like out-takes from a H&S conference. And if people want to ride in black then it's a legitimate choice they don't need lecturing about.

Pete.

Re: Long Term Tour & Saddle Sore

18 October 2014 - 12:10pm
When I really suffered on a very long tour, I changed from a Brooks which is extremely rigid at the back to a soft vinyl saddle. The parts taking the most hammering were moved, the sore ares rested, and this helped. Ibuprofin helped too. If you are riding on bumpy surfaces this makes things ten times worse. If you have two saddles with you, you can swap them every few days and give the painful areas a rest.

Al

Re: Long Term Tour & Saddle Sore

18 October 2014 - 11:56am
Ditch the padded shorts, when I did this my saddle sore days ended.

Re: Long Term Tour & Saddle Sore

18 October 2014 - 11:52am
If you're already doing your best in the hygiene department about the best thing you can do is take a couple of days off. Not always possible but its the only real cure

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

18 October 2014 - 11:44am
Hi

If you subscribe to the contrast theory then what is the correct colour for greatest vis on a longer ride...oilseed rape fields, followed by a built-up area, followed by a shady "tree tunnel"?

I always wear either a yellow, an orange or a white jersey; I prefer the orange one during the day because it doesn't attract hordes of little flying things from the fields, at night I prefer either yellow or white. No science, just my preference

I don't use lights during the day unless it's foggy (or similar), again it's just my preference

If drivers don't look far enough ahead, drive too quickly for their view, or just don't think, then potentially it's game over regardless of colour / lighting

Regards
tim-b

Re: St Malo to Narbonne

18 October 2014 - 9:53am
Hi Linda,

My wife and I are planing to ride from Narbonne to home in Oxfordshire on our tandem, so we just might meet en route.

We have done it before and went via Mazamet this time we are looking at a flatter route, we will after all have a combined age of 143.
We are doing this to "celebrate" our golden wedding anniversary.

Our plans are only outline at present as we have to be fit/well enough to do this.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

18 October 2014 - 9:35am
Spinners wrote:I just think there's more chance of a cyclist being seen by wearing brighter colours. That's all.+1

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

18 October 2014 - 9:31am
maxcherry wrote:So why do people in Hi-Viz, with lights and helmet get knocked over ?

Did I ever say they didn't?

I just think there's more chance of a cyclist being seen by wearing brighter colours. That's all.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

18 October 2014 - 9:21am
It seems to me to be ridiculous that much cycle clothing is black, I call it the new yellow.

The Highway Code rule 59 says cyclists should wear the following

appropriate clothes for cycling. Avoid clothes which may get tangled in the chain, or in a wheel or may obscure your lights
light-coloured or fluorescent clothing which helps other road users to see you in daylight and poor light
reflective clothing and/or accessories (belt, arm or ankle bands) in the dark.

There should be no doubt that anyone unfortunate enough to be involved in any incident and not wearing appropriate clothing does so at their risk /choice.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

18 October 2014 - 8:57am
pjclinch wrote:What hi-viz certainly does that started me wearing it is standing out at very long distances, but the more I thought about it the more I realised you don't get hit when folk are a long way away. I can't recall any incident (driving or riding) where I've suddenly come across a bike (or car) at short range because it wasn't a conspicuous colour (including plenty of "stealth cyclists"). I can recall those where something turned up out of a blind spot, or where my own observation had been poor.maxcherry wrote:Black stands out in daylight. It's not true that bright colours make people more aware.Two answers from me here.

We were driving home from Liskeard in September, and there's a long stretch where you can see maybe half a mile. It's a great place to get a move on and perhaps overtake slower vehicles and lorries etc.

The road was clear, I was doing about 55mph maybe 60 it was about four in the afternoon and lovely bright weather. In the distance we saw a "shape" and as we got nearer it was a cyclist dressed in mainly black. There was no problem and we gave him plenty room as we passed him, but it was only because I had my eyes peeled into the distance that I saw him. Had there been a string of vehicles, I doubt we'd have seen him quite so early.

Obviously, cyclists don't get hit by vehicles a long way off and obviously I'd have seen him eventually and early enough to be no problem, but it is nice to see that the road is clear a way off so you can plan your line.

Had he been wearing something brighter, he would have been seen for what the "shape" was.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

18 October 2014 - 8:29am
Black stands out in daylight. It's not true that bright colours make people more aware.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

18 October 2014 - 8:05am
maxcherry wrote:Why does wearing black matter if I have lights on my bike?
Bright colours are for being seen in daylight.

Re: The Struggle in lake district

17 October 2014 - 8:19pm
Just had a look at Google earth and the road I am thinkin of is indeed north rd, which goes past the unicorn pub and then past kirkstone foot I think, it seemed to go on for quite a while and I only joined it bout half way down walking it I think, not quite sure where it ends up at though

Re: The Struggle in lake district

17 October 2014 - 8:10pm
It's a long time since I walked up that road but I don't know how long it stays tarmac - obviously it is a bit of a dead end for vehicles. Looking at the map I can easily believe that it may be as steep as the struggle, but not as long.

Re: The Struggle in lake district

17 October 2014 - 7:45pm
Yep Bicycler, defo went up the struggle via the small roundabout out of Ambleside and eventually up to the hairpins near the top of the Kirkstone inn. I seem to remember a road called Sweden bridge on the right as I walked down what I think is the kirkstone rd to the bottom where the gem or stone shop is, so by the sounds of it our wires have got crossed between me and the guys in the shop. Looked pretty steep to me walking down it and a climb I have not done before on my bike, it seemed to go on fir quite a way, but definitely not the "struggle"........although it would be!

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