CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition

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Updated: 2 hours 25 min ago

Re: Diabetic Feet on Tour

21 November 2014 - 3:54am
B&b with radiator for the shoes and then waterproof over shoes would be another method. We picked some excellent waterproof equipment up in the Netherlands a few years ago, good commuter kit, which cleared up incipient trench foot. Boy, that was a wet holiday.- I'm sure there will be similar kit available decent cycle shops in towns you visit. Good luck with the tour.

Disclaimer: I know nothing about diabetes and what will work best for you.

Re: Brittany - the draining of the Lac de Gueledan

21 November 2014 - 3:40am
bretonbikes wrote:MrsHJ wrote:I noticed the climb up Mur de Bretagne coming from the east - it felt steeper than that!!. The 8 year old very stoicly walked it in a very hot day. At least we didn't miss the turn to the campsite like the rest of the family. I bet the campsite isn't very happy about this.

That isn't actually the steep bit! Sorry to disappoint;-)

No worries, I've done plenty of HC climbs, the perception changes massively when cycling with the kids. And no doubt in a few years they'll be going up everything and I will be left far behind.

What's the purpose of draining the lake?- aha, just read your link, mechanical repairs.

Re: Diabetic Feet on Tour

20 November 2014 - 11:50pm
I'm T1 and my cycling now is mostly commuting in all weathers, 10 miles/40 minutes. If it's raining or has been then the Sealskinz get worn on the commute and depending on how wet they get decides on how long I wear them when I get into work. Most of the time I'll keep them on as it quickens the drying time and putting damp shoes on 9 hours later doesn't feel as bad. If I get caught out in rain without my Sealskinz socks then I have spare socks in my locker along with a jar(?) of baby powder which gets sprinkled on my feet and legs before I don my work clothes. I work 99% of the time in a +2c chill warehouse and don't suffer with cold feet in my workboots despite only wearing a thin pair of sports socks on my feet. Sealskinz socks do take their time to dry which is why I have two pairs so that I have a dry pair ready to wear.

Re: Diabetic Feet on Tour

20 November 2014 - 9:13pm
I think you have to wait a bit more time for responses ferdinand ? few people are in your predicament and probably dont want to make useless comments on a serious matter?

Re: Diabetic Feet on Tour

20 November 2014 - 6:19pm
Ferdinand I'm sorry you have had a poor response for a serious enquiry. I'm not diabetic - but I would have happily recommended sealskinz socks to you. They work. There have been reports of water getting in by running down your leg in very wet conditions, suggested solutions seem to centre about taping the top of the sock to your leg. Haven't had this problem myself, but even if water does get in this way you should certainly be able to dry them out overnight (turn them inside out!) and start the next day with cosy toes. Good luck!

Re: Touring Cassette

20 November 2014 - 4:03pm
Unless the cassette-chain is worn out the cheapest way would be to just change the inner chainring.
Put it small-small and measure the gap between the chain and the bottom of the front derailleur cage.
You need 2 mm per tooth reduction.
So a 4 mm gap will let you drop the inner by 2 teeth and an 8 mm gap will let you drop it by 4.

Re: Touring Cassette

20 November 2014 - 3:38pm
I have 44/32/22 x 11-30 on my touring bike but my preference is spinning rather than honking up hills(I am 59).. this might be of use to you http://www.bikecalc.com/gear_inches

Re: Need advice on a bike tour of Scotland

20 November 2014 - 3:06pm
hi Radomir
your route looks great ...I see you have cape wrath included ... (a great trip) ..just to let you know this ferry is run depending on the weather http://www.capewrath.org.uk/

Re: Diabetic Feet on Tour

20 November 2014 - 2:07pm
I've yet to tour and it isn't looking like I'll be able to until next year. I've been type 1 for 34 years.
From my days of commuting ten miles to work and ten miles back in all sorts of weather, I can't remember wet feet ever being a problem. I'd get to work, put on dry sock and work boots and go about my business with no adverse effects other than wrinkly feet if it was bad enough.
The problems may start if you combine wet feet with cold weather. But even then I think it would take some time for any long term issues to surface. Neoprene overshoes might be your best bet and shoes with as little padding as possible will dry out quicker than those with lots of padding.
The best overshoes I've ever used are these... http://www.amazon.co.uk/BBB-HardWear-BW ... +overshoes
Mine are nearing 3 years old and still waterproof and cosy. Water gets down the sides but any overshoe will have that problem.

Re: What is the best dynamo hub for touring?

20 November 2014 - 8:41am
That clarifies things. In remote areas I would indeed also like some backup and even produce my own electricity. Solar is getting better, but heavily dependent on where you are. In your area it may be quite viable. As for the rest, I think you need to distinguish between gps and phone. As I said, the right kind of gps can last a long time if it does not need to work hard (can you design and load tracks in advance?). Phones consume rather a lot. On the other hand, you can buy these external battery packs that will give you a couple of extra charges for your phone (buy serious quality). If you take a e.g. netbook (I don't, but many do), its battery can serve the same function. The other advantage of an external battery pack is that it does not matter that much if it gets stolen. My Etrex 30 cannot be charged from usb power, however.

Re: What is the best dynamo hub for touring?

20 November 2014 - 8:28am
My primary requirement is as a backup source of power for my garmin and phone. I'm cycling from Canada to Mexico next year and whilst I am planning to stay in motels I thought that having backup power would be a good idea as I'm using an inland route which can be remote.

Im planning to cycle during the day so battery powered lights will be fine

My phone is also my backup GPS, map, hotel paper work, camera, video, email, etc,etc so is equally important

The hub option is starting to look expensive for my requirements

I do have a small battery that will provide one charge to either and can then be recharged when I have power - maybe this is enough?

What about solar?

Re: Diabetic Feet on Tour

20 November 2014 - 6:37am
Well, I'm T1 too, but don't cycle that much. I have longed to tour, but just don't think I could manage the condition in that environment. However I was watching the thread with interest. Have you looked over on runsweet.com or the diabetes.co.UK forum?

Cheers
Barry

Re: Diabetic Feet on Tour

20 November 2014 - 5:59am
Interesting that no one seems to have felt able to comment on this one, or perhaps no Type Is cycle!

I found an outdoor shop selling waterproof Sealskinz socks (£30 - ouch), and went for the lightest weight version.

After a careful plastering of embryonic rubs and a potential blister I have done 60 miles in the 2 days since and it is fine, even though shoes have been continually damp.

Sealskins next time methinks as the main socks, and drying the inside every night.

Fortunately my cycloshoes are slightly generous esp when they have worn in and are wet, which may have been a part of the original issue.

Ferdinand

Re: Diabetic Feet on Tour

20 November 2014 - 5:59am
Interesting that no one seems to have felt able to comment on this one, or perhaps no Type Is cycle!

I found an outdoor shop selling waterproof Sealskinz socks (£30 - ouch), and went for the lightest weight version.

After a careful plastering of embryonic rubs and a potential blister I have done 60 miles in the 2 days since and it is fine, even though shoes have been continually damp.

Sealskins next time methinks as the main socks, and drying the inside every night.

Fortunately my cycloshoes are slightly generous esp when they have worn in and are wet, which may have been a part of the original issue.

Ferdinand

Re: Need advice on a bike tour of Scotland

19 November 2014 - 7:31pm
You could cut out some of the mileage if you use the bike bus that runs from Inverness to Durness. It stops at Ullapool so you could use it to get to Durness.
This is the website
http://www.inverness-durness-highland-bike-bus.co.uk/

I would however suggest you e-mail the company first just to make sure the bus will run next year and to check the dates it will run as it is seasonal.

Re: Need advice on a bike tour of Scotland

19 November 2014 - 4:17pm
I also thought but to ask is better...
As to road after Ardgay everything is clear now. Thank you.
Tomorrow I will try to change my track according to all advices...

Re: Need advice on a bike tour of Scotland

19 November 2014 - 3:52pm
Sorry! YH = Youth Hostel

Your route from Alness is on B9176 which joins A836 about 5km before Ardgay. At Ardgay your route turns left onto a minor road and towards the YH at Culrane. In order to regain the main road A836 you will have to use a foot path and footbridge over the river. Better to stay on the A836 I think. The last time I went that way I stayed at the YH and I remember carrying our bikes up some steps to use the foot bridge.

You can see the footbridge here, alongside the railway bridge.
https://maps.google.co.uk/maps?ll=57.924694,-4.400539&spn=0.01397,0.042357&t=m&z=15&layer=c&cbll=57.924595,-4.400438&panoid=wDjgQQ2sbp_7s2QB4wEhvQ&cbp=12,180,,0,0

Re: Need advice on a bike tour of Scotland

19 November 2014 - 2:18pm
Firstly, I would like to thank everyone for their advices.

To: Peter Molog
I'll study your tours in Scotland. It is interesting. I have already downloaded the recommended maps to my PC. Also I will put it on the GPS. There's a lot of details and it is good...

To: Norman H and rfryer
Really I see I have to change my track and exclude off-road parts. I see the best way is to finish our trip at Oban and take a train to Edinburgh...
I'll come back soon with a new track.

Norman H wrote:.... at Ardgay where your route appears to go via the YH at Culrain, which I believe is now closed, and uses the footbridge over the railway at Invershin to regain the main road.. Stay on the main road, A836 to Lairg. Incidentally your route goes past the Crask Inn. “The Crask” is, I believe, up for sale but you should aim to spend the night there if you can. Especially if you like whisky!
Sure, we like whisky
Frankly speaking I did not understand a little bit the above and your abbreviation. What is it YH? Kidly ask you to expain more clear the way after Ardgay....
As to Crask I already found it.

Re: Touring with family - Bike advice needed

19 November 2014 - 12:16pm
We toured in France (Brittany) this summer with our (then) 18mth old and 3.5 year old kids: Mostly the kids were on our Yuba Mundo, but we also had a road bike pulling a 2-seat trailer (Burley Bee). Both bikes had tow hitches, so could swap the trailer over to the Yuba (lower gears for big hills) and if the 3.5 year old wanted to sleep, he could go in the trailer.

Yes, the Yuba is heavy, but when loaded with 25kg of kids plus various bits of camping gear, it's not a big issue. Good touring tyres are vital though. We plan to go camping next year with the same setup.

Re: Bike fit for French canals

19 November 2014 - 11:09am
Yes it very much depends on the canal in question. Where are you thinking of going?

Christiian wrote:Bordeaux (rather Langon) to Toulouse is a great surface most of the way and you'll be fine on audax bikes and 32mm tyres. Toulouse to Sete is pretty but can be really rough in places: there are long sections where you would even want to be on a hardtail(which I've also done, and still lost a pannier going over a particularly large root).

Agree with this! I did the Garonne (Bordeaux to Toulouse) with 28c gatorskins with no problem whatsoever. The Midi is tarmac leaving Toulouse but then becomes a stony bumpy unpaved track - we skipped it and went on the road instead. The subsequent bits of the path we did see looked virtually unrideable on a touring bike. Even with thick tyres it will be very slow going and uncomfortable.

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