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Re: trans am for novice advice needed

3 February 2016 - 9:34pm
bump

Re: lighting in Germany

3 February 2016 - 7:06pm
The reason I carry lights is for tunnels and to have a torch. It also helps in rain and where tree's overhang the road for long stretches.

Berlin hostels can fill on summer weekends; some advance booking is wise. Berlin can be hot!

Re: d lock for touring?

3 February 2016 - 6:18pm
Independently and before I read it I also thought of Micks suggestion.

Get a light but chunky looking padlock and a bit of light chain.

http://nothingbutpadlocks.com/products/ ... chain-65cm

http://www.pvrdirect.co.uk/productinfo. ... oCPrzw_wcB

And…

http://nothingbutpadlocks.com/products/ ... sc-padlock

Unfamiliar stuff might put a thief off?

Al

Re: d lock for touring?

3 February 2016 - 6:01pm
pwa wrote:TrevA wrote:
Brilliant lateral thinking! Just go to a place where stuff doesn't get nicked!

yes, like a small island, or holiday in your garage.

Re: lighting in Germany

3 February 2016 - 5:44pm
Thanks for the advice everyone, one less thing for me to worry about

Re: d lock for touring?

3 February 2016 - 4:59pm
TrevA wrote:robing wrote:I don't take a D lock touring. I've got enough to carry without a dirty great lock. I don't really leave the bike anywhere unattended in busy places. In cities I tend to use hotels and take bike in room or secure store. I was on the ferry to Barra from Oban and another touring cyclist had a massive Kryptonite Lock with them! I said you won't need that on the Outer Hebrides!

I just take a small cable lock. We stayed on Islay and Mull and had to leave our bikes outside on Islay. I didn't even bother to lock mine.

Brilliant lateral thinking! Just go to a place where stuff doesn't get nicked!

Re: WESTERN ISLES

3 February 2016 - 4:54pm
rualexander wrote:TrevA wrote:We did the Inner Hebrides last May. I think it rained almost every day and I was in full winter gear most of the time, with Goretex on top in the rain. So long as you dress for the weather, it's not too bad. Can be quite windy but I don't think I saw a single midge.
Last May was unusually bad.

Just my luck!

People did say that they'd had a very late spring and it was unusually cold and wet for the time of year.

Re: d lock for touring?

3 February 2016 - 4:46pm
robing wrote:I don't take a D lock touring. I've got enough to carry without a dirty great lock. I don't really leave the bike anywhere unattended in busy places. In cities I tend to use hotels and take bike in room or secure store. I was on the ferry to Barra from Oban and another touring cyclist had a massive Kryptonite Lock with them! I said you won't need that on the Outer Hebrides!

I just take a small cable lock. We stayed on Islay and Mull and had to leave our bikes outside on Islay. I didn't even bother to lock mine.

Re: morocco suggestions please

3 February 2016 - 4:39pm
Only just spotted this post - sorry for the delay in replying

I will be going later so cant make it. Thanks anyway.

Interestingly I have since read a journal on CGOAB from a guy complaining about hoteliers trying to rip him off and aggressive kids. I've decided to go anyway but interested if you experienced this?

Re: touring and flying with hydraulic disc brakes

3 February 2016 - 2:59pm
The two reasons I went for discs(cable BB7's)where wet weather stopping power,which is far superior than rim brakes,and rim wear which can be diabolical in UK winter conditions.
Other than that I agree with you.

Re: touring and flying with hydraulic disc brakes

3 February 2016 - 1:50pm
As a simple soul with mere v brakes I sit and wonder at the debate. Personally for my type of touring I do think vs are the best. As someone said earlier, as there are problems, why bother?

Nonetheless, seeing as the OP is deciding, two points which have not been mentioned:

Weight, surely a couple of v arms are a lot lighter than all the disc malarkey. OK, I know weight will be dismissed as it is a touring bike.

Cost, surely a couple of v arms are a lot cheaper than all the disc malarkey. Even a couple of new rims hardly brings the price near.

Ding, ding seconds out, back to the main bout.

Re: Switzerland, St. Moritz to Martina

3 February 2016 - 1:34pm
I rode up the Umbrail Pass many years ago, which joins the Stelvio Pass road just below its summit. It did involve a short section of poor road surface (a bit gravelly) but was quiet and okay on a loaded tourer. Another favourite was the Albula Pass, with its rail bridges between canyon like cliffs.

Re: Switzerland, St. Moritz to Martina

3 February 2016 - 12:51pm
There are a number of options - although I guess it depends to a degree whether you want to avoid the Passo dello Stelvio.

The two Stelvio options are:

- go via the Forcola di Livigno and then down through Livigno into Bormio
- go via Poschiavo down into Tirano and then follow the Sentiero della Valtellina over to Bormio.

Both lovely roads.

You could take the Inn Radweg that avoids the 27 road for much of the way. There are a couple of sections that look like they might be unsurfaced, but with 1.5" tyres you should be be fine. You can climb up to Nauders and from there to to the Reschensee (Lago di Resia) and then follow the Vinschgau Radweg (also part of the via Claudia Augusta) into Meran and then Bozen.

There also looks like there's an interesting road (the 28) via the Passo del Ruorn (Ofenpass) into Mals/Malles. Note though that if you want to pick up that road from Livigno you have to take a bike-shuttle through the Munt de la Schera tunnel.

See my website for more information, on some of this.

This is probably the most useful site for bike-friendly places to stay:

http://www.altarezia.eu

Re: touring and flying with hydraulic disc brakes

3 February 2016 - 10:18am
One point,which may seem trivial to some,though IMHO important.
Self adjusting disc brakes can be a help,but they can also work against you if you aren't aware of just how worn your pads are.
I'm thinking long descents on a long tour where pads could be worn out without the rider realising how worn they are.I know someone who has degree of mechanical sympathy would be 'in touch' with the need for regular checks on pad status,but where an ever growing number cyclists treat their bike in the same way the do their car,letting a shop service a repair it,they don't always have that sympathy.
The first they realise their pads are worn is when the brakes fail or begin to make 'funny' noises,if that happens on a long descent it could be a bit hairy to say the least .

Contrast that with cable discs,or rim brakes FTM,where they need to be manually adjusted and so prompts thought and sympathy that things are wearing.
A small point but valid IMO.

Re: touring and flying with hydraulic disc brakes

3 February 2016 - 9:00am
TonyR wrote:pwa wrote:You can tour on anything you like, so long as you can carry your kit on it. It is worth asking about these things while you still have a choice though. Personally, I'd avoid any technology that I can't work on by a roadside, just to avoid unnecessary hassle. That would include electronic gears (not likely on a touring bike anyway) and hydraulics. And I'd make sure I knew how to do basic repairs to the components I did take.

Yes, you can tour on anything you like. But there is nothing in a hydraulic brake that you can't work on by the roadside either. I just don't understand this negativity of cable brake users about hydraulic brakes - much of it based on perceptions rather than experience.

Hydraulics are much more reliable than cable brakes and need much less maintenance - why do you think hydraulics are the norm on motor vehicles? The worst that's going to happen if one fails is you are going to have to ride on one brake until you get the other fixed and if you can't do it yourself any competent garage mechanic could do it for you as they work on hydraulic systems all the time. And car mechanics are far more common around the world than bike shops.

In about 50 years of cycling the only brake that has failed, 100%, on a descent, was a hydraulic disc brake. I was glad that my other brakes were vees so were not going to let me down in the same way. I also think that, unlike with motor vehicles, hydraulics are not needed. Properly set up vee brakes will lock the wheels of a heavily loaded bike, as will a cable operated disc brake. Even in the wet. Cantilevers are less inspiring but still adequate. And with a bit of forethought you can have spare cables, pre-cut to length, in your tool bag, weighing practically nothing and taking up next to no space. Not that you are ever likely to need them. My brake fettling on tour (with cantis) has never involved more than turning an adjuster or, at most, spending five minutes changing the blocks. I've never had cable problems.

Re: Great Ocean Road.....

3 February 2016 - 8:26am
simonhill wrote:Just remembered. Not the GOR but between Ad and Me on the routel. The youth hostel in My Gambier then a YHA was in an old prison. A real granite built fort of a place. Rooms in cells with no windows and original doors locks now on inside. I remember it being very hot and humid outside, but decidedly chilly (actually and metaphorically) inside. Stainless steel loo in the corner!

Enjoy.

I will look forward to THAT !!!!!......

Again, many thanks for all the replies....Appreciated.

Re: touring and flying with hydraulic disc brakes

3 February 2016 - 8:14am
TonyR wrote:Yes, you can tour on anything you like. But there is nothing in a hydraulic brake that you can't work on by the roadside either.

I just don't understand this negativity of cable brake users about hydraulic brakes - much of it based on perceptions rather than experience.


Are you telling me that you are carrying a drill and a hammer in your toolkit to remove and replace rivets to take a brakelever apart? Love to know where you buy the seals btw

Hydraulics are much more reliable than cable brakes and need much less maintenance - why do you think hydraulics are the norm on motor vehicles?

hydraulics can be made very reliable, if that is your design goal. If however the design goal is shiny, lightweight and compact, reliabilty takes a backseat. I've yet to come across a automotive diskbrake without a dustseal, or a bicycle diskbrake with one.

Re: touring and flying with hydraulic disc brakes

3 February 2016 - 7:45am
pwa wrote:You can tour on anything you like, so long as you can carry your kit on it. It is worth asking about these things while you still have a choice though. Personally, I'd avoid any technology that I can't work on by a roadside, just to avoid unnecessary hassle. That would include electronic gears (not likely on a touring bike anyway) and hydraulics. And I'd make sure I knew how to do basic repairs to the components I did take.

Yes, you can tour on anything you like. But there is nothing in a hydraulic brake that you can't work on by the roadside either. I just don't understand this negativity of cable brake users about hydraulic brakes - much of it based on perceptions rather than experience.

Hydraulics are much more reliable than cable brakes and need much less maintenance - why do you think hydraulics are the norm on motor vehicles? The worst that's going to happen if one fails is you are going to have to ride on one brake until you get the other fixed and if you can't do it yourself any competent garage mechanic could do it for you as they work on hydraulic systems all the time. And car mechanics are far more common around the world than bike shops.

Re: Great Ocean Road.....

3 February 2016 - 2:29am
Just remembered. Not the GOR but between Ad and Me on the routel. The youth hostel in My Gambier then a YHA was in an old prison. A real granite built fort of a place. Rooms in cells with no windows and original doors locks now on inside. I remember it being very hot and humid outside, but decidedly chilly (actually and metaphorically) inside. Stainless steel loo in the corner!

Enjoy.

Re: touring and flying with hydraulic disc brakes

2 February 2016 - 10:35pm
TonyR wrote:Yes and no. For worn out pads only if you've got new ones with you. Riding in gritstone areas you can get through brake pads pretty fast which was why I first switched to discs.

Snapped cables can only be fixed if you carry a spare cable with you.

I've just cut a seized cable off a bike. Last ridden two weeks ago and in the meantime its seized so solid that I couldn't pull the outer off the inner. So new inners, outers and a pair of cable cutters in the pannier to deal with that one.

Maybe I'm just lucky but in the 15 years I've had hydraulic brakes (on four bikes) they have been fit and forget apart from the occassional pad change. The cable brakes on my other bikes have needed regular maintenance. And I can repair the hydraulic hoses at the side of the road with a penknife and brake fluid bought from any garage. How many garages carry brake cables for bikes?

I'm not denying your good fortune with hydros,merely pointing out that cable discs(BB7's at least)are easily stripped with minimum fuss and simple hex key tools that are carried as part of a tourists normal kit.
I always carry two spare cables(even on day rides),one brake and one gear,as they weigh almost nothing.
The only time I've had cables seize has been due to ice and that was a gear cable at the short outer near the rear mech.
I find stainless brake and gear cables if kept well greased and not over tightened at the pinch bolt,extremely reliable,free moving and long lasting.
I think I pointed out up thread the ease of maintenance,and reliability of cable discs IME.
They can also lock up either wheel with ease,with plenty of modulation,as such I want for nothing more.
If hydros suit you then be my guest
Disc pads of course are as easy to change on either system so no gain or loss there.
BTW I ride drops,so not quite as easy to accommodate hydros at reasonable cost.

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