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Updated: 1 hour 42 min ago

Re: New Forest Tour

22 February 2015 - 10:24pm
I'd also recommend Acres Down http://www.acresdownfarm.co.uk/campsite.html. The north side of the Forest is quieter and hillier. There are several campsites near Fordingbridge in the NW corner which is a good place to buy food. The route through the Forest edge villages from Downton to Ringwood is lovely too. Various other camping options around Nomansland but no idea about the quality.

HTH
Julia

Re: Tour de Isle of Wight - 1-4 May 2015

22 February 2015 - 10:15pm
I would not advise leaving your vehicle in a New Forest car park over a Bank Holiday - it is notorious for breakins even when there's nothing on show. Use Google maps and find a residential street in Lymington with on street parking and leave it there. Works well for us.

Re: Rotterdam > Istanbul - Which bike?

22 February 2015 - 9:33pm
Dawes - In my opinion the Ford of touring bikes. Lots of models all perfectly competent but not especially exciting. Maybe a tiny bit overpriced but discounts are available!

Janis - don't know enough about them really; never heard anything bad. If you can get on with the frame shape and bar end shifters it's probably the better of the two. Why? Better wheels and tyres and of course was more expensive in the first place.

Try riding both then you'll have a better idea.

Re: Shane goes lightweight :)

22 February 2015 - 8:38pm
Rucksack : Food and water.....a great incentive to keep both to a minimum.....I'm known to carry way way too much of both

Re: Pannier Inventory Lists

22 February 2015 - 8:36pm
How many panniers? I've just sold my front panniers and will now have two rear, frame bag and bar bag. Hope it all fits!

Re: Shane goes lightweight :)

22 February 2015 - 8:31pm
What did you carry in your rucksack?

Re: USA Tour

22 February 2015 - 8:21pm
In general, the cost for a camping place is the same, independent of how you arrive.

However, state and national forests usually have some places 'reserved' for late arrivals by foot or bike and they are much less likely to turn you away without a reservation than if you arrive by car.

Also, there are campgrounds that do not allow campervans and motor homes. These are usually a bit cheaper. Some place like Yosemite, it's best to book in advance, if you can.

http://www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/campgrounds.htm

Note that Yosemite (and most other state and national forests) have a fee to enter the park, as well as camp. But those fees are typically smaller if you walk or cycle than if you bring a motor vehicle in.

IMO, $20 is not too bad. Many private campgrounds will charge more. You can sometimes camp for free on farmland, or public space, but always ask first, as tresspassing is a criminal act in the USA. If there isn't a local tourist information to ask at, ask at the police or fire station. They are usually happy to help and can tell you where it is safe and legal to camp.

Re: USA Tour

22 February 2015 - 8:02pm
Thanks , that's useful advice. I've pretty much decided to ride from San Francisco across to Yosemite , down through the Giant Sequoia park , across death valley , to the north rim of the Grand canyon , then head NE to Pueblo , cross the Plains to Washington via the Ozarks and Appls. I thought 3 months would do it , I did 4,500mls in Europe in 70 days so I think I'll be ok on time . Two questions :
What maps would you recommend ? When I'm in Europe I use l motoring atlases because they're cheap,
How much do American campsites generally charge for solo campers ? The only fees I've seen on web sites seem a bit steep - $20+ but I think this might be for cars.

Ta Nigel

Re: Shane goes lightweight :)

22 February 2015 - 7:37pm
Hi,
Great, what the next trip

Re: Shane goes lightweight :)

22 February 2015 - 7:07pm
Nope, didn't miss anything but my 3season bag (though that was easily compensated by a creditcard and cheap hotels...Spain is one of the few places I've been in the world that actually has single rooms).

Loved the simplicity of packing with so little gear and the easy of carrying such a light set up, or lifting it over gates and walls.....

Re: Shane goes lightweight :)

22 February 2015 - 6:39pm
Looks a great trip, did you miss not having anything? (other than a warmer sleeping bag!)

Re: Shane goes lightweight :)

22 February 2015 - 6:32pm
The weather was rarely above 10 degrees, mainly dry.Better to go in Spring

The shower block story is that it was -2 outside and I only had my summer sleeping bag with me and the campsite was deserted

Re: Shane goes lightweight :)

22 February 2015 - 6:28pm
I'll be doing this route in May/June this year
What was your weather like? The first half looked good! Obviously will be considerably hotter when I go.
My Spanish is reasonable so hopefully should get by.
What was the story behind the photo of you dossing down in the shower block?!

Re: Pannier Inventory Lists

22 February 2015 - 5:47pm
PH wrote:Easy Peasy
Left pannier - all bedding, radio, book and washkit in drybag
Right pannier - Clothes, in clean or dirty bag
Saddlebag - daystuff, inc jetboil, waterproof, repair kit, spare gloves, food and anything else that might be needed between camps
Bar bag - valuables, wallet, phone, camera etc...
Tent on top of panniers and rack.

All up weight around 12kg, this does me for two weeks non extreme touring. With minimal cooking and wearing mostly the same on and off the bike.
IMO the big advantage of being organised is the time it takes to set up and pack away, I like to have had a coffee and be cycling within half an hour of waking up.


This is exactly how I like to travel.I've learnt from years travelling not to over-burden myself and to limit my movements weighed down with extra kit.
That's a good list, I shall note it.

Re: Pannier Inventory Lists

22 February 2015 - 5:41pm
Get some digital kitchen scales too, then you really start throwing stuff out. Its shocking how heavy some things are that you " might" need

Its great to keep track of what you take each time, write down what you didn't use or missed then adjust your list. Unfortunately my trips are each so unique that I keep starting from scratch The evolution is amusing to see though

25kg heavy weight touring in Africa

25kg lightweight touring in winter

10kg bikepacking

Re: Pannier Inventory Lists

22 February 2015 - 5:41pm
Easy Peasy
Left pannier - all bedding, radio, book and washkit in drybag
Right pannier - Clothes, in clean or dirty bag
Saddlebag - daystuff, inc jetboil, waterproof, repair kit, spare gloves, food and anything else that might be needed between camps
Bar bag - valuables, wallet, phone, camera etc...
Tent on top of panniers and rack.

All up weight around 12kg, this does me for two weeks non extreme touring. With minimal cooking and wearing mostly the same on and off the bike.
IMO the big advantage of being organised is the time it takes to set up and pack away, I like to have had a coffee and be cycling within half an hour of waking up.

Re: Shane goes lightweight :)

22 February 2015 - 5:33pm
All on one chain
Yes

Mud guards
Not for off road touring

Tent did you have one
Msr hubba (only used it 4 times though as it was a little chillier than I'd expected)

Whats the locals like
Very friendly, though almost zero English speakers

Any grief
3 punctures and a couple of dogs that needed a boot.

You've done it before, but how long to plan.
Been planning a backpacking trip for a while, decided on this one about 3 weeks before I started

Population a bit sparce on route
Nope, passed through 2-3 villages most days.

Re: Pannier Inventory Lists

22 February 2015 - 5:26pm
I love those minimising lists of kit as they make so much sense. Lugging my own carcass weight around is enough. Carrying less kit is obvious.

Re: Advice sought on choosing a touring bike

22 February 2015 - 4:58pm
On the subject of braking with rim brakes, the important thing on long descents (eg Alps) is to have the courage to allow your speed to build up, then brake hard for the next bend. Rims heat up most when you are constantly on the brakes trying to keep the speed down all the time. If you are 2km down a 10km descent and you think your rims may be getting too hot, just pull over and (carefully) touch them. If your skin comes off I would pull over and let them cool. As previously said, its not a common problem and its easily handled.

In the 1990s I managed to blow a rear tyre on an alpine descent at 40mph due to keeping my brake on too long. Braking harder, for a shorter period is the key.

Re: Istanbul and cycle home.

22 February 2015 - 4:53pm
Hi rob
Sounds like a good tour plan you have.
I'm thinking of a similar trip home from turkey in early may but returning via greece and the adriatic coast maybe???..perhaps turning north to pick up the ev6 somewhere.... not sure yet.
Out of interest, can i ask who you are flying with and rough costs of the flight?
Cheers
Pete

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