CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition

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Updated: 2 hours 27 min ago

Re: light weight touring weekend saddle bag?

6 April 2015 - 3:31pm
You could try one of the newer saddle packs such as the ones Appkit, Revelate et al make. Basically they are a saaddle bag mounted sideways! I have a couple for both the road bike and off road bike, pretty much for using as you suggest. They are very stable and are only a little more effort to get into, a price I am happy to pay for the lack of swaying etc.
The even cheaper option would be the Alpkit cuttlefish, at least that is what I think it's called. £20ish for a lightweight pack, basically a shaped dry back for a saddle pack, but it has mounting webbing so could be used as a full saddle bag with maybe a little more effort to get it fitted solidly.

Re: Hotel or camping during a cycling tour?

6 April 2015 - 2:29pm
I go to northern France for most of my cycling where I think the local setup favours camping - the weather, for me anyway, is what you might call Goldilocks i.e. not too hot, not too cold for camping, and the place is littered with reasonably priced camp sites, the French gov. subsidising their town campsites. France too is predominantly rural, which is where I do most of my cycling, but I agree with others - why apply a hard-and-fast rule to stick to one regime or another? MixNmatch, do what feels right at the time... I nearly always find a cheap hotel if I'm in a town/city, and sometimes it's great to stay in a rural chamber d'ote and enjoy a bit of pampering. But on the whole, your typical 2 or 3 star camping municipal has got everything I need/want so that's where I tend to head to...

Re: Carrying currency on a tour in Europe

6 April 2015 - 2:20pm
Good to hear the various ideas here. Have usually just gone with €cash in various stashes but next trip is more adventurous so needed something a little more long term so have applied for a CaxtonFx card, seem ideal.

One odd note: When applying it just said there was an error with my application and to expect an email, didn't get an email so applied a few more times, same result. Phoned and they were awesome, turns out by error they just mean they need to do some manual credit checks on me and then email me, not an automated response. Just hope I don't end up with 5 cards and an empty £ account

Re: 142 Turf Moor

6 April 2015 - 12:49pm
Turf Moor - and there was me thinking it's a football ground.....

142 Turf Moor

6 April 2015 - 12:45pm
Wasn't sure where to post this but it relates to Simon Warren's 'Another 100 Greatest Cycling Climbs'. I've just done the one above (as part of a a 50 mile spin) and for anyone also doing this I thought I'd mention firstly the whole climb has been well-resurfaced and the drain cleaned so water shouldn't course across the road. It's a good time to do it. Also he is right about treating the ford with caution; it is stoned and quite concave, despite just gently free-wheeling through it I nearly wobbled off at the end.

Was there a thread about these climbs? - I thought there was but couldn't find it.

Re: Practical GPS 101

6 April 2015 - 12:17pm
bohrsatom

Thanks for that information especially the tracking. I dont know if I would trust a device to record a number of days without saving.
How long does recharging take using charging device and how long does charging device take to charge?
What is the rating (mAh) of your Anker device and will it provide more than one charge?
I can see myself getting into a world of dynamos and/or solar chargers. I never yet had a map run out of power.

Re: light weight touring weekend saddle bag?

6 April 2015 - 12:15pm
If not using a saddle bag presumably you'll carry on with your rear carrier and will anything that holds 20 litres be significantly lighter than your single Ortleib?
There's not much any good other than Carradice for 20 litre sized saddle bags and, as you say, there's little point in saving 200 grams - under 1/2 a pound.

Re: Hotel or camping during a cycling tour?

6 April 2015 - 12:11pm
I take an emergency tent and sleeping bag. I camp when there is no decent alternative. I like a roof. On one tour. no hotels available, we managed to snag a mobile home on a campsite instead of using our tents.

I don't normally sleep well in tents. I find I interact with more people in B&Bs. I like coming down to a buffet breakfast and stocking up for the day. I can also cook in my room in a hotel, whereas I do not tend to cook evening meals on campsites. I eat out. It's expensive for a lone traveller in hotels but sometimes I just think "sod it, I'm on holiday".

Re: light weight touring weekend saddle bag?

6 April 2015 - 11:59am
I'd be taking something that is multipurpose so you can use it in different ways, the bike packers often use dry bags, but maybe a lightweight backpack.

http://www.pedalingnowhere.com/gear/dry ... kepacking/

http://www.seatosummit.com.au/products/ ... -day-pack/

http://www.seatosummit.com.au/products/ ... -dry-bags/

Re: Hotel or camping during a cycling tour?

6 April 2015 - 10:48am
cheesypeeps wrote:PaulB wrote:It depends how much stuff you want to haul with you. Travelling light (good title for a song!) without camping gear, means hotels or B & Bs but if you travel alone be prepared to be ripped off by the "Single Person Supplement"!

Can anyone explain this single person supplement to me. Surely if your willing to pay for the cost of a double room and it's £35pppn and ur happy to pay £70 that should be ok. I don't get charging £80 or the like. Ur using one less shower, one less towel to wash, eating one less breakfast.... I just don't get it!!

It is a constant bugbear - the big groups often do it better as you pay per room not person. It annoys me no end when i pay a single 'supplement' then get put in a single room! i can understand a supplement if i'm in a multi occupancy room but otherwise it is a rip off. I have to say that i find it less of an issue generally when i'm abroad, its the anti single person attitude in the UK that really irks - there are lots of single travellers - we supplement couples/families. Then of course there are the 2 for 1 meal deals, free child places/food - someone has to pay and that someone is the single person.

Hotel or camping during a cycling tour?

6 April 2015 - 10:16am
PaulB wrote:It depends how much stuff you want to haul with you. Travelling light (good title for a song!) without camping gear, means hotels or B & Bs but if you travel alone be prepared to be ripped off by the "Single Person Supplement"!

Can anyone explain this single person supplement to me. Surely if your willing to pay for the cost of a double room and it's £35pppn and ur happy to pay £70 that should be ok. I don't get charging £80 or the like. Ur using one less shower, one less towel to wash, eating one less breakfast.... I just don't get it!!

Re: Practical GPS 101

6 April 2015 - 10:01am
I used a Garmin Edge 800 for a 4-month tour, so my experiences are probably quite similar to what you'd get with the 810.

Power - A day's riding used about 60% battery so it needed charging every single day. Where possible I connected it to mains power for a couple of hours but failing that I had an Anker backup battery which worked fine. I then took advantage of whatever power I could get to keep the Anker battery charged.

Navigation - you can only have a single active route at any one time, either following a GPX track/route or using the device to navigate to a particular point. So you can navigate to a point away from your GPX route and the Edge will create a new route between your current location and destination. Getting back to your GPX route is straightforward. When you first load the route be sure to choose "Always Display = ON". This means the Edge will always show it on the map even if it is not the active route. Then to get back to your route you just need to find that line on the map and set it as your destination. When you make it back to your planned route just re load the original GPX route and select "No" to "Navigate to start of route?".

Routing with no paths - unless the map you are using has the paths recorded then you won't be able to do A-to-B navigation on the device. The only workaround would be to create a GPX track on your computer, send it to your device and navigate using "Turn Guidance = Off" in the course settings. You won't get the Turn Left/Turn Right alerts but it will be displayed as a purple line on top of the map.

Saving ride data - I think the data is only saved when you press the reset button. So if you have a long ride over multiple days just don't press reset and you'll get one file with all ride data. If you make a mistake it's not the end of the world as it's possible to join/split/edit GPX tracks.

The only issue with routing on the device is that it's pretty inflexible. If you want to go from A to B via C then you're going to need to do A - C then C - B, and it's even harder if you'd prefer to take one road over another. There are a few settings that let you tweak how the device creates routes, and if you are using OpenCycleMap then the map data is set up to make the device favour bike routes. But you need a PC/Tablet to get a high level of control over where you are going. On my trip I was following pre-planned routes 95% of the time but would let the device navigate to supermarkets, campsites, etc that were a few miles away. I wouldn't have trusted it to create 40-50 mile+ routes that avoided major roads.

Re: Hotel or camping during a cycling tour?

6 April 2015 - 9:28am
Camping for me. I can't sleep in a bed that isn't 'mine'.

Re: Spalding to Fosdyke Bridge

6 April 2015 - 8:08am
Haven't been along there for some years now. If you want to know what it's currently like I suggest you contact Alf or Teresa Webb at the Bike Inn. They live and work about half way along your proposed route to Fosdyke. http://www.bike-inn.co.uk/default.asp

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

5 April 2015 - 11:09pm
bigjim wrote:Are modern bikes suffering from the fashion for a long drop to the handlebars? I struggle with modern frames to get comfortable. I'm 6'2" with very long legs. Bikes from older era tended to have the handlebars a lot closer to saddle height. This, IMO, to facilitate riding on the drops a lot more. Hence those simple single sidepull brakes that people believe are not very powerful. But operate them from the drops and they are just as good stoppers as the modern stuff.
I try to buy older, mint, if possible 25" horizontal toptube frames. I don't have to have too much stem or seatpost showing and can comfortably ride in the drops.
I do have smaller frames but once aboard the big ones I notice such a difference in comfort. I tour on a big 25" 90s frame and can ride comfortably all day.


well its the small frames and the cut off steerer? unless u get a preying mantiss frame?

Re: Hotel or camping during a cycling tour?

5 April 2015 - 10:00pm
It depends how much stuff you want to haul with you. Travelling light (good title for a song!) without camping gear, means hotels or B & Bs but if you travel alone be prepared to be ripped off by the "Single Person Supplement"!

Re: Has technology changed touring?

5 April 2015 - 9:55pm
I just cycled back from Exeter on Sat, met a lady who was on holiday in Scotland with her husband who has a hip problem and can't cycle she had decided to get cycling again. She just decided there and then to cycle a JOGLE. We met her in a cafe and bought her a sandwich, she had her bike and an A to Z and stayed at B&B's, what an inspiration! I am a fully loaded tourer, camping etc.. with loads of tech two ends of the spectrum but we both enjoyed what we do!

My friend and I are going to visit her and her husband and cycle near where she lives, this world is great! Cycling can be whatever you want just enjoy it, for all those who turn their noses up at people with tech and for those who look down on someone with a cheaper bike lower budget etc.. stop and think before you open your mouth focus on enjoying what you do, don't concern yourself with what the other person is doing just take the joy that they are having.

I saw a guy like myself heavy not a typical cyclist shape, he was on a brand new bike expensive, all the gear and he was struggling up a hill and I saw him give up and start pushing, couldn't help myself pulled over told him to keep going and his fitness etc.. will soon catch up till he enjoys hills, he got back on and gave it another go I hope he carries on and wears that bike out!

If you are going to comment on the way someone else does it, encourage them take pleasure in the fact they are doing something they want to in the way they want to, offer advice but don't be offended if they disagree we all learn on the way. I love the tech and it's part of my pleasure I also like just getting on my bike and peddling enjoy life!

watch this music video for me says it all: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UtF6Jej8yb4

Have fun everyone, I am sat here still smiling from meeting both of them life is good!

Spalding to Fosdyke Bridge

5 April 2015 - 9:46pm
Mrs. M-k and I are about to set out for a week on Alderney and then six weeks on a grand and foolish "In Search of Beeston" tour on our tandem around East Anglia, the Midlands, and the North of England. We leave April 11th, so is my last query about routing before we sent out.

Has anyone any recent experience of the route from Spalding to Fosdyke Bridge along the south bank of the Welland? Google Earth shows it as all well and good until the last mile-and-a-half or so before Fosdyke Bridge. At this point Marsh Road turns into South Bank Road, but it appears to become a private road at this point, signposted "Private Road — No Unauthorized Access — Gated Road". (Not exactly welcoming.) The cycle route turns left onto Old Sea Bank and then turns right along the bank of the river, eventually rejoined South Bank Road. Google Earth's Image of this route doesn't look very inviting either — especially if it's been raining — but the satellite image is dated 2006. Has there been any improvement — or deterioration, come to that — since then?

Thanks in advance.

Re: Has technology changed touring?

5 April 2015 - 9:33pm
I toured in the 60s. All I had was a Carradice saddlebag and a 5 speed bike. I stayed in Youth Hostels or maybe a bus shelter. They were one of the happiest times of my life. No technology the likes of what we have today. Maybe it was youth and freedom from care but I can't remember wanting anything more.

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

5 April 2015 - 9:18pm
Are modern bikes suffering from the fashion for a long drop to the handlebars? I struggle with modern frames to get comfortable. I'm 6'2" with very long legs. Bikes from older era tended to have the handlebars a lot closer to saddle height. This, IMO, to facilitate riding on the drops a lot more. Hence those simple single sidepull brakes that people believe are not very powerful. But operate them from the drops and they are just as good stoppers as the modern stuff.
I try to buy older, mint, if possible 25" horizontal toptube frames. I don't have to have too much stem or seatpost showing and can comfortably ride in the drops.
I do have smaller frames but once aboard the big ones I notice such a difference in comfort. I tour on a big 25" 90s frame and can ride comfortably all day.

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