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Updated: 1 hour 29 min ago

Re: 200km the aftermath and advice wanted

26 October 2015 - 1:38pm
PH wrote:I read it as 9.5 hours. If it was 24mph I have no advice to give...I got it wrong - it is just under 23mph. Still rapid by my standards. I read it as an odd way of writing 5 hours and 45 minutes.

Re: 200km the aftermath and advice wanted

26 October 2015 - 1:34pm
tatanab wrote:samsbike wrote:It was the longest I have been on a bike in one sitting, approximately 5 and 4.5hrs. 131 miles in 5.75 hours, that's 24mph, a good racing effort. Several mph faster than I ever managed at that sort of distance back in the 70s. Even when racing I would spend a fair time on the tops and hoods. It was some years later that I had a spell of neck pain, and I can certainly recall hunched shoulders as mentioned above. This was always brought on by riding harder and longer than I was accustomed to at that time.

I read it as 9.5 hours. If it was 24mph I have no advice to give...

Re: 200km the aftermath and advice wanted

26 October 2015 - 1:27pm
samsbike wrote:It was the longest I have been on a bike in one sitting, approximately 5 and 4.5hrs. 131 miles in 5.75 hours, that's 24mph, a good racing effort. Several mph faster than I ever managed at that sort of distance back in the 70s. Even when racing I would spend a fair time on the tops and hoods. It was some years later that I had a spell of neck pain, and I can certainly recall hunched shoulders as mentioned above. This was always brought on by riding harder and longer than I was accustomed to at that time.

Re: 200km the aftermath and advice wanted

26 October 2015 - 1:07pm
samsbike wrote:It was the longest I have been on a bike in one sitting, approximately 5 and 4.5hrs.
I dont think I have ever done more than about 3 hrs in one sitting before.

That's your answer, I'd continue to look at what's causing the neck problems as these are happening on shorter rides and not worry about the rest until you've done a few more rides of that length.
That's a huge jump and just getting through it is an achievement.

Re: 200km the aftermath and advice wanted

26 October 2015 - 1:04pm
pwa wrote:As the others have said, cycling over 100 miles is bound to produce a few aches and pains, especially if you don't often go that far. Don't be misled by people talking about saddles and bike positions being "comfortable". They mean "tolerable".
That may be your experience but it certainly isn't mine and I frequently ride 100+ mile touring days without the need for padded shorts, as do several other people I know.

Re: 200km the aftermath and advice wanted

26 October 2015 - 12:59pm
It was the longest I have been on a bike in one sitting, approximately 5 and 4.5hrs.

I do have a banana back - my flexibility is poor.

I dont think I have ever done more than about 3 hrs in one sitting before.

Also we hardly stopped was continually pedaling.

I didnt use the drops a lot but my bars are quite high so I find it relatively relaxing just to drop down and pedal steadily.

I think I did have tight glutes and hamstrings, I just have not done enough yoga and it was more of a twinge in my back that a constant pain.

cheers for all the feedback.

Re: water carrier Q.

26 October 2015 - 12:49pm
used to use one of those, never bothered to hang it. These days i either use my waterbottles or i have a pertex water bag that i carry - it folds down to the size of a walnut!

Re: 200km the aftermath and advice wanted

26 October 2015 - 12:29pm
foxyrider wrote:How long were you on the bike? Saddle soreness is related more to time than distance so if you normally ride for six hours and it took you ten then it will inevitably be uncomfortable! Would you be comfortable sat on a kitchen chair without moving for 10 hours? Essentially the longer you spend in the saddle the less it will be an issue in the future. The 200km event i do each spring can be excrutiating (7-8 hour ride) or just tiring (5.5 hour ride) - the first one i did took 10 hours and everything hurt!

How much did you use the drops? Endurance riders don't usually use them for extended periods as its a less than comfortable position, like the saddle though you can 'train' yourself to cope with it longer. Its generally more comfortable to alternate your hands around the top of the bars - i usually end up on the hoods as thats my default comfort position, i very rarely get on the drops.

Wow!

Re: New Zealand Tour

26 October 2015 - 12:16pm
rualexander wrote:Generally you should be able to ride most gravel roads (except perhaps after they've been graded) with that set up but Marathon Supreme sidewalls can be a bit fragile so maybe think about a tougher tyre.
Yes most NZ main roads have a good shoulder that you can ride on but it often means that traffic won't move over at all to pass you, so keep well to the left if its busy, also the shoulders disappear at bridges.
Only restricted roads are the motorways, of which there are only two or three short ones in the whole country close to the main cities, and there are plenty alternatives.
I can't comment on mobile internet as its seven years since I was last in NZ, but why not get Viewranger or something on your phone, they have the whole of the South Island at 1:50,000 topographical mapping for £15, or whole of NZ for £22 https://shop.viewranger.com/products.php?category_id=33

Thanks for this. Any recommendations for a tougher tyre that will still roll nicely?

Re: 200km the aftermath and advice wanted

26 October 2015 - 10:39am
Do something new and you can expect some new aches and pains. The body adapts to your normal exercise load over time; go beyond that and its not ready. Reduce your riding and you will loose cardiovascular fitness as well as some muscle. Increase the riding and they will increase.

1. Happens to us all. If the saddle is the right fit then as you do more long rides you will adapt and the soreness should lessen. Alternatively try Vaseline or chamois cream on the 'sore' spots before you set off

2. Sore neck is often caused by hunching up your shoulders. Your shoulders need to stabilise against something otherwise your upper body is weak. Hunching up your shoulders makes them rely on your neck to stabilise and your neck muscles are not that strong so do some shoulder shrugs and bring them back down into a neutral position (but not using your lats and traps to pull them right down). Here they will stabilise against your core which is very strong. Check periodically during the ride where they are. The tendency is to rise as you tire

3. Possibly caused by lower back muscles tiring as your lower back tries to stabilise your hips so that the glutes and hamstrings have something to work against. If your lumbar spine bends so that you have a 'banana' profile the lower back muscles will be stretched and not working in their strongest alignment. Tight glutes, hamstrings and/or hip flexors may need to be sorted. Try riding with a neutral lumbar curve bending the back higher up to get down on the drops or move forward on the saddle when you go down to keep the lower spine aligned

Hope some of this helps

HarryD

Re: 200km the aftermath and advice wanted

26 October 2015 - 10:36am
Go out and do say 20 miles today. At easy pace no more than 80% of maximum effort

You are bound to get twinges if you haven't done that distance before
Stretching can help as well particularly for the lower back area. But I always think getting back on the bike is the best way to relieve the aches pains post a long distance ride.

Re: 200km the aftermath and advice wanted

26 October 2015 - 10:30am
samsbike wrote:What can I do with respect to the above?

I think the answer lies in your beginning...
samsbike wrote:For the first time yesterday I did a 200km ride,

You went beyond what you usually do. I think some discomfort is normal.

That you could do it at all suggests that your position on the bike is quite good. That you have some neck ache, even on short rides suggests it's not quite perfect, yet.

If you want to ride 200 km more comfortably, you need to do it more often. Or at least 100 + miles more often.

200km the aftermath and advice wanted

26 October 2015 - 9:58am
For the first time yesterday I did a 200km ride, well slightly longer I think it turned out at around 131miles.

Overall I had tinges but the position on the bike worked relatively well especially up to around 110miles. The last 50 or so miles I had twinges in the knees and legs that moved around and today the right knee hurts but not in bad way just a gentle throb.

Post that though this is what did hurt -

1. my bum, despite a brooks canbium and padded shorts - this was beginning to really irritate on the last 20 miles
2. my neck and RH trapezius muscle (something that even happens on short rides)
3. very slight lower back ache.

What can I do with respect to the above?

Overall the position on the bike works and I like the ability to move around the seat (fore aft) especially to climb uphill when I move very slightly backwards. The bars were set so I used tops, hoods and drops. I am not sure if using the drops contributed to the neck ache.

The neck is the one bit that still hurts today especially when I turn it.

thanks

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