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Re: Cycle Touring Festival Clitheroe

20 January 2015 - 5:56pm
£75.00...?

Wowzers! That's me priced out too unless something changes. I live over four hours away in Somerset, so I've got to factor in travel expenses; a local teenager to look after my chickens and kennels or dog sitter for my spaniel.

A shame........hc

EDIT: As a comparison (so I'm not just moaning) I went to a 4 day, 3 night festival at the beginning of Summer last year and paid £40.00 for a FULL price ticket. Camping, talks, workshops and similar, day- time and night-time entertainment (live bands) all included. You could bring your own food or buy there. I bought there and for fresh, wholesome, produce it cost me £8.00/day for the 1st 3 days (3 meals) and £3.00 on the last day (breakfast). Good value and I'll go again.

The festival industry is over-saturated as you know and it's really hard to get good attendances. Apart from the whole bank-loan problem which makes life difficult for festival organisers, it's little wonder they go bust all the time.

I'll never get to see Yorkshire or Lancashire at this rate. It's expensive up North.............hc

Re: Cycle Touring Festival Clitheroe

20 January 2015 - 5:39pm
Vantage wrote:I received an email update concerning the festival the other day. This is part of it...

How much are tickets?

Early bird tickets will cost £75 for the weekend. This includes: •Two nights basic camping accommodation
•Lunches on Saturday and Sunday; dinner on Saturday
•Access to all talks and workshops


£75 is the price for the discounted limited number early booked tickets as I understand it.

So that's me priced out of it

Not surprised you won't be going at that price.
I think that will put off a lot of cyclists.
I pay £25 for 3 nights camping including 2 nights entertainment at our national motorcycle event.
What is it that warrants £75?

Re: Cycle Touring Festival Clitheroe

20 January 2015 - 5:12pm
I received an email update concerning the festival the other day. This is part of it...

How much are tickets?

Early bird tickets will cost £75 for the weekend. This includes: •Two nights basic camping accommodation
•Lunches on Saturday and Sunday; dinner on Saturday
•Access to all talks and workshops


£75 is the price for the discounted limited number early booked tickets as I understand it.

So that's me priced out of it

Re: Bike suitability for a particular interior road in Icela

20 January 2015 - 4:40pm
Load distribution, yeah that's the other caveat I haven't mentioned. This will be my first time touring with front panniers, as I will need the extra capacity. I've not tested my bike with front panniers yet. Got the rack, just haven't fitted it yet. And if it makes it unstable, which I gather is possible, I might have to re-evaluate. Tubus racks btw, so solid enough there.

To be honest, for this trip, I have to be ready that things will fail. If it's not the bike, it will be the tent or something else, it's quite likely. I would mind on a longer trip and more far away locations, but with a short trip which didn't cost much and a place like Iceland, I don't think I would be too disappointed if I have to be a regular tourist for a couple of weeks.

But yeah, I'll probably go and get that stronger wheel set from Spa..

Re: Bike suitability for a particular interior road in Icela

20 January 2015 - 4:27pm
22camels wrote:Yeah ok I will probably go with the new wheel set, but I'm still a bit skeptical as I'm on a bit of a budget and to invest another 250 into a bike I won't be keeping for that much longer seems a bit rash. 40mm tyres on new wheels, or 35mm tyres on current stock wheels, that I've had no trouble with, never a broken spoke. Actually I have done, on 28mm tyres, a bit of forestry roads here and even beaches where the sand was dense enough and it was fine. There is a lot of variation in off-road surfaces, even within Iceland, so, lacking experience, it's difficult for me to say now how it will be on the specific road I'm thinking of taking. Also whilst yes sure it's true that strong wheels are essential, and Iceland demands an extra high level of preparedness, I suspect it's tempting to over prepare / over insure - yes if you want the trip to be perfect, or if it's a long trip, yes, but for a short trip of three weeks, if there is a 50% chance I'll be fine with my current setup, if a bit slow on the gravel, and the other 50% of the time, my wheels break in the first week, I have to catch a ride to the next town, and spend the rest of the trip larking around on foot, do I mind that much? Not sure..
I don't adventure tour, but I do do a very specialist sport in a very remote place and where if stuff breaks I just cannot do what I travelled halfway round the World to do.

My motto is to buy the right kit (not necessarily the most expensive), take spares, make sure I'm entirely self-sufficient such that I can mend myself or my kit if either breaks. It's been close once or twice, but I've only ever lost one half-day in c30 trips and that was due to my own crass stupidity and the proximity of a whisky bottle I think others have given you great advice along similar lines which will help your trip to go as you'd wish.

Re: Bike suitability for a particular interior road in Icela

20 January 2015 - 4:23pm
22camels wrote:Yeah I need to learn how to replace broken spokes.

Do you think upgrading just the back wheel will be alright then, there wouldn't be some sort of imbalance between the wider heavier stronger rim on the back, and the narrow, lighter, weaker rim on the front?

That's the thing, I wouldn't lose most of my holiday as I'm sure I would still have a good time even without my bike, it's about expectations. But I guess the primary purpose I set myself for this trip is to learn more about longer distance bike touring in a more challenging environment as the max I've done up to now is one week in quite easy places and I have plans for a much longer trip. So in that sense yes I think should take the bike side of it seriously .

If funds are limited, then the priority would be the back wheel, you would have to keep the load limited up front ( just enough to make handling of the bike better) and avoid potholes, your front wheel might not survive those.

Maybe you could do the rough stuff in the last week? That way any problems are not too much of a big deal, you will still have had lots of cycling, doing this you might be able to use your existing back wheel.

Re: Bike suitability for a particular interior road in Icela

20 January 2015 - 4:14pm
If you want to help preserve the wheels do not put everything on the rear of the bike, spread the load! Take an emergency spoke - no need to remove cassette to get you going again.

Looking at those roads, it looks like fun and i'd happily tackle them on my Airnimal!

Re: Bike suitability for a particular interior road in Icela

20 January 2015 - 3:51pm
Yeah I need to learn how to replace broken spokes.

Do you think upgrading just the back wheel will be alright then, there wouldn't be some sort of imbalance between the wider heavier stronger rim on the back, and the narrow, lighter, weaker rim on the front?

That's the thing, I wouldn't lose most of my holiday as I'm sure I would still have a good time even without my bike, it's about expectations. But I guess the primary purpose I set myself for this trip is to learn more about longer distance bike touring in a more challenging environment as the max I've done up to now is one week in quite easy places and I have plans for a much longer trip. So in that sense yes I think should take the bike side of it seriously .

Re: Bike suitability for a particular interior road in Icela

20 January 2015 - 3:34pm
Yes, that sounds like good advice. Having the kit and the knowledge to repair wheels in the field will cost you little and give you a feeling of independence. You need to be able to get the cassette off (tiny portable tool from Spa) and you need spare spokes (mainly cassette side rear) and a spoke key.

Re: Bike suitability for a particular interior road in Icela

20 January 2015 - 3:25pm
22camels wrote:Yeah ok I will probably go with the new wheel set, but I'm still a bit skeptical as I'm on a bit of a budget and to invest another 250 into a bike I won't be keeping for that much longer seems a bit rash. 40mm tyres on new wheels, or 35mm tyres on current stock wheels, that I've had no trouble with, never a broken spoke. Actually I have done, on 28mm tyres, a bit of forestry roads here and even beaches where the sand was dense enough and it was fine. There is a lot of variation in off-road surfaces, even within Iceland, so, lacking experience, it's difficult for me to say now how it will be on the specific road I'm thinking of taking. Also whilst yes sure it's true that strong wheels are essential, and Iceland demands an extra high level of preparedness, I suspect it's tempting to over prepare / over insure - yes if you want the trip to be perfect, or if it's a long trip, yes, but for a short trip of three weeks, if there is a 50% chance I'll be fine with my current setup, if a bit slow on the gravel, and the other 50% of the time, my wheels break in the first week, I have to catch a ride to the next town, and spend the rest of the trip larking around on foot, do I mind that much? Not sure..

Turn it around and look at it another way. You only have a short trip, a breakage could mean losing most of your holiday. To keep costs down you could just upgrade the back wheel. These at £86 for rear wheel

http://www.spacycles.co.uk/products.php ... b0s176p349

will do the job perfectly. For the front take do not put a lot of weight up front, take a few spare spokes and learn how to repair them. Most spoke breakagages are on the rear anyway. When you get rid of the bike, sell the rear wheel on here ( or transfer to the new one, it will almost always be better than what is supplied on a new one if the rear wheel is machine built), you'll get a decent price.

Re: It makes me want to tour there again .....

20 January 2015 - 3:08pm
foxyrider wrote:mercalia wrote: No more charabangs ( wow thats the first time in probably 50 years or so I have used that term, I had to confirm its spelling ).

and you still got it wrong, its actually charabanc as any bus enthusiast will tell you!

Now if you're being pedantic it's actually char-à-banc

Re: Bike suitability for a particular interior road in Icela

20 January 2015 - 2:35pm
Yeah ok I will probably go with the new wheel set, but I'm still a bit skeptical as I'm on a bit of a budget and to invest another 250 into a bike I won't be keeping for that much longer seems a bit rash. 40mm tyres on new wheels, or 35mm tyres on current stock wheels, that I've had no trouble with, never a broken spoke. Actually I have done, on 28mm tyres, a bit of forestry roads here and even beaches where the sand was dense enough and it was fine. There is a lot of variation in off-road surfaces, even within Iceland, so, lacking experience, it's difficult for me to say now how it will be on the specific road I'm thinking of taking. Also whilst yes sure it's true that strong wheels are essential, and Iceland demands an extra high level of preparedness, I suspect it's tempting to over prepare / over insure - yes if you want the trip to be perfect, or if it's a long trip, yes, but for a short trip of three weeks, if there is a 50% chance I'll be fine with my current setup, if a bit slow on the gravel, and the other 50% of the time, my wheels break in the first week, I have to catch a ride to the next town, and spend the rest of the trip larking around on foot, do I mind that much? Not sure..

Re: 2nd pair of shoes

20 January 2015 - 2:07pm
Birkenstock sandals. Quite often cycle in them too

Re: accommodation

20 January 2015 - 12:46pm
foxyrider wrote:whoof wrote:Guess its always worth asking if there are facilities when you book.


I always check before I book it's just that there is no need in France I just turn up. Last year I was going to book with a hostel in Wales which advertised secure bike parking but when I asked on the phone this turned out to be their back yard. I had to contact three places in the Isle of White before finding somewhere for this February.

Re: Bike delivery service - Virgin BikeMagic

20 January 2015 - 12:05pm
Doesn't sound like £50 is the insurance limit, just what you get included as standard - imagine that you can pay for more...

Re: accommodation

20 January 2015 - 11:56am
whoof wrote:The main problem I have is what to do with my bike. In France I I turn up at a hotel and ask if they have somewhere safe to park my bike the answer is always 'of course the garage, cellar, office, your room....'
In the UK it's as if I just asked where I can keep my ox for the night. 'There might be some racks in the street around the corner, perhaps in the garden or could I not put it in my car?'. I know there are lists of cycle friendly B and Bs but the point is in France I don't need a list as they are all cycle friendly.
Guess what, this summer another two weeks cycle touring in France.

Have to say that in my experience most accomodation have been helpful in providing secure bike parking, i think only once have i had to park the bike on the street and that was in Celle in northern Germany. Otherwise its lived in cleaning cupboards, cellars, garages, my room, conference rooms, back corridors.............Guess its always worth asking if there are facilities when you book.

Re: It makes me want to tour there again .....

20 January 2015 - 11:48am
mercalia wrote: No more charabangs ( wow thats the first time in probably 50 years or so I have used that term, I had to confirm its spelling ).

and you still got it wrong, its actually charabanc as any bus enthusiast will tell you!

Re: 2nd pair of shoes

20 January 2015 - 11:45am
Lightweight sandals or deck shoes, they take hardly any space in the bag. The moulded foam type are great - light, waterproof and cheap!

After a day riding i'm glad to have an alternative to my cycling shoes for the off bike activities although i might go shoeless on nice grassy/sandy campsites!

Re: Bike suitability for a particular interior road in Icela

20 January 2015 - 10:25am
If your Tricross survives baggage handlers it will probably survive Iceland! There are plenty of forestry "roads" in the UK for you to experience gravelly tracks and test the suitability of tyres. But good strong wheels will be essential for a loaded bike on rough surfaces.

Re: Touring in Norway

20 January 2015 - 10:21am
beardy wrote:Asking from the viewpoint of somebody who has never flown with a bike, do the luggage weight limits allow you to carry enough kit (including the bike) for four weeks of wild camping?
It depends... Some airlines will allow either allow teo pieces of baggage, and accept a bicycle as one of them. Others do not include bicycles as part of the luggage allowance, but allow them to be carried for no additional charge, with some limitations. Others make passengers pay for everything.

viewtopic.php?f=16&t=67410 is a couple of years old, now, but has some good information.

Excluding the bicycle itself, between carry-on and a checked bag, it's usually possible, even if the checked bag is just panniers all strapped together.

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