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Updated: 44 min 39 sec ago

Re: Oh eck...its another one of those "What bike" questions.

3 January 2015 - 6:22pm
Sorry if this is fast turning I to a Thorn fan club page but my vote is for a Thorn Raven.
Not as heavy as the Nomad but can carry almost as much IMO.
Rohloff hub adds a grand but complete piece of mind re back end.
I added a chain glider guard so pretty happy with set up for far flung touring.
Off to do the Pamir Highway in May.

Lots of other bikes around but happy with the Thorn.

Matt

Re: Oh eck...its another one of those "What bike" questions.

3 January 2015 - 4:56pm
+1 for the Thorn

I agree about getting a strong bike with strong wheels and they don't come a lot stronger than Thorns.

I have a Thorn Sherpa and it's very reliable. 26" wheels with deore hubs , 36 spokes and Rigida Grizzly rims. (These are very light but very strong).
The bike has V brakes which are simple, easy to repair and replace.
The Thorn frame is Double Butted, Seamless, Heat Treated, Cold Drawn, Cro-mo. which again is light but very strong.

You have plenty of time to find a 2nd hand one but make sure you get the right size for you.
check out the size chart of the Thorn "mega brochure"

http://www.sjscycles.com/thornpdf/THORN ... OCHURE.pdf

Big Cheat Alpine route?

3 January 2015 - 4:20pm
I experienced riding in the Alps for the first time last year (Austria and the Reschen Pass into Italy) and was so impressed by the Alpine scenery that I would like to tour there for a couple of weeks again this year. The problem is that, though I don't mind some climbing, I'm no longer a young feller so am looking for an easy-ish option. Please can anyone advise of an Alpine route of say 400 kms which isn't too difficult, maybe with a train ride to ease the way, !!!
Thanks.

Re: Oh eck...its another one of those "What bike" questions.

3 January 2015 - 3:35pm
MartinBrice wrote:The Tricross isn't made for carrying luggage and doing very long trips on rough roads.
I think you will find that that is precisely what the Tricross was designed to do! So maybe the latest models are not as nice as earlier ones but they still do the job very well.

MartinBrice wrote:It's more of a cyclo-cross bike - one light bloke, lots of mud, all over in a few hours.
In fact its nothing like a cross bike, well okay a slight resemblance.

There are lots of 'anyroad', 'allroad', 'adventure' available these days, some of which like my Focus Mares and the Kona Jake do have cyclo X heritage but that doesn't mean using one will compromise your comfort and/or enjoyment.

Re: Oh eck...its another one of those "What bike" questions.

3 January 2015 - 3:33pm
Depending what size you want, this struck me as good value http://www.thorncycles.co.uk/forums/ind ... ic=10379.0

Re: Oh eck...its another one of those "What bike" questions.

3 January 2015 - 2:47pm
Another point is the 26 v 700 wheel argument. I personally go for 26 with an MTB type set up as spares are easier to get.

Re: Oh eck...its another one of those "What bike" questions.

3 January 2015 - 2:36pm
al_yrpal wrote:A friend went cycle touring in Vietnam recently, hit a pothole and busted his arm in four places. Make sure you get a tough touring bike.

Al

Of course we never have potholes in the UK! Any more pointless scare stories?

Turning to the OP. I am not sure why you think you will be riding lots of dirt in these countries. Most of the major roads are paved and I imagine that if you only have a month in each you won't be venturing far off these well cycled routes.

Many of the roads are better than you will find in the UK. Last year I rode over 3000 kms mainly in VN and Cambodia and only rode 220kms of dirt. Most of this was a particular road that I sought out in the far east which is probably paved by now.

Edit in as it got lost in posting: you may find longish sections of roads under (re) construction that can prove challenging. These are likely to be the most dirt that you will ride.

As for a bike, I am no expert, but would recommend something reasonably tough that you can rely on. I ride a Surly LHT, but as I am light and travel light it is probably a bit over the top. Nonetheless I like the security it offers as I am often in fairly remote areas, albeit on paved roads.

You don't say if you are thinking of doing it, but I don't recommended camping.

I ride these countries often, as in a few months most years, so happy to advise on routes, etc.

Re: Oh eck...its another one of those "What bike" questions.

3 January 2015 - 2:18pm
+1 for Thorn. I swear my Club Tour is tougher than any similar bike although it is well equipped with quality components. It eats miles, is stable loaded, and even with drop bars handles tracks and bad surfaces well.

Re: Oh eck...its another one of those "What bike" questions.

3 January 2015 - 1:58pm
Buy a Thorn. The Tricross isn't made for carrying luggage and doing very long trips on rough roads. It's more of a cyclo-cross bike - one light bloke, lots of mud, all over in a few hours. If you want trouble-free riding for week after week while carrying a lot of luggage, there's not a lot of choice. You might cavil at the starting price: remember you can always sell it afterwards, they fetch a reasonable price on the used market. If you need convincing, have a look at some long-distance cycling blogs to far-off places and see what they ride and if they have trouble with the bike. There's no substitute for experience, and you can obtain that by reading other people's blogs.

Re: Show your touring bikes !!!!

3 January 2015 - 12:33pm
Thanks, I've found some other images now. They are the only grips I've seen that have the clamp bolt on the leading edge.

I don't get on with ergonomic grips, only comfortable in one position for me, and don't allow many positions.

Re: Show your touring bikes !!!!

3 January 2015 - 12:05pm
The Grips are " SQlab 711 SY Short" installed the right way round, and I install them (and the ergon grips on other bikes) slightly steeper than most people for a comfy wrist angle

It's quite amusing that with all the fancy bits on that bike that there's a discussion about the 20 quid grips

Re: Oh eck...its another one of those "What bike" questions.

3 January 2015 - 12:02pm
A friend went cycle touring in Vietnam recently, hit a pothole and busted his arm in four places. Make sure you get a tough touring bike.

Al

Re: Jura, France via Belgium & Luxembourg

3 January 2015 - 11:45am
I stayed in Ghent for a night at Poort Ackere Monasterium which is right in the centre, it gets mixed reviews and is a bit expensive but an interesting experience. Have a good trip.

Oh eck...its another one of those "What bike" questions.

3 January 2015 - 11:38am
Hi all,

Okay, so it looks very likely that I am going to get 4 months off work at the end of the year, I’ve asked and my manager has okayed it, and so has his manager, just director level to go and then its signed and sealed, so its 99% happening.

The plan is to tour in South East Asia, a month each in Thailand, Laos, Vietnam and Cambodia. While I expect sealed roads in Thailand, I’d expect to cycle a fair bit of dirt track in the other country’s. At the moment I tour on a Specailized Tricross and its lovely and most importantly, it’s very comfortable, but I have a couple of concerns. Firstly, will I get up all those hills on it and secondly, are the wheels strong enough to spend a long time on the dirt tracks. I’ve suffered a lot in the past with broken spokes and this time want to make sure the wheels/bike are bomb proof.

I’m in a very lucky position of not having to worry too much about the money, but don’t want to spend £1000 plus on a bike that might only get used twice a year after this tour.

Just writing this I’m clearer on what I’d like, I’d like to make the Tricross tough enough for this trip, but I do imagine it to be a bit on the light side.
So what would you guys do, over haul the Tricross or buy a new bike? If you buy a new bike, what would you look at?

Thanks in advance to any help you give.

Jura, France via Belgium & Luxembourg

3 January 2015 - 9:24am
Hi all,
In June/July I'm planning to cycle to the Jura in France & would like to go through Belgium & Luxembourg. Does anyone have any route advice please ? It's my first trip of this kind & I plan to B&B & travel light. Any GPS routes that I could download would be helpful.
Cheers

Re: Show your touring bikes !!!!

3 January 2015 - 8:30am
it looks like that bike gas Ergon grips which have the flat part back facing backward. from the side this flat bit looks pointy. so they are mounted correctly, though their angle looks a little steep. Still, if the rider is comfy, that's all that matters

Re: Veloscenic France

2 January 2015 - 11:09pm
Yes, thanks, that's the one that sparked my interest - and the guy in the picture is a close likeness to me!! Looks a good, rewarding but relaxing route.

Lewis

Re: Veloscenic France

2 January 2015 - 9:49pm
A short article about a tour on this route appeared in the latest issue of Cycle mag.(Dec 2014/Jan 2015).

Re: TOURING 2015

2 January 2015 - 9:34pm
Mistik-ka wrote:alicat wrote:Wouldn't bother with the Beeston in Leeds, exotic is not an adjective that sits well in the same sentence as it.
Nobody said it was a sensible plan. (Walking from London to Edinburgh wasn't exactly sensible.)
If we were sensible, we'd probably take an all-expenses-paid cruise to somewhere warm and dry…
Besides, who has the heart to break a promise made to a teddy bear?


Ignore him when your are in Leeds pop down Beeston Hill to Elland Road and the home of Leeds united Football club, one of the most famous Football teams in the country.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leeds_United_F.C.


.

Re: Poole(UK) to Santander(Spain) Blog update

2 January 2015 - 9:13pm
Ive just read your blog, fantastic. Ive done Spain back to Poole (via St Malo) right up through the middle of France but your route down looks so much more fun than my route up....

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