CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition

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Updated: 2 hours 15 min ago

Re: Dilema - mud-guards or wider tyres

12 April 2015 - 2:33pm
andrew_s wrote:bigjim wrote:One of the lads at the club runs his rear mudguard over the top of the brake bridge to achieve clearance. he just trims the guard with a stanley knife so it will fit between the narrow stays.
You can get rear mudguards that are in two sections, either with a bridge connecting the two sections over the top of the brake (eg Salmon) or with a section each side of the pinch point above the tyre.

The crud guards I have, split into two, and narrow under the brake to allow them to fit - but not with a 25mm tyre I suspect as it's already tight with 23mm.

As to going over the brake, my seat stay is single until the brake where it splits either side of the wheel, so would have to be two sections each starting at the stay (how would they be attached) or would have to widen to allow an inch or more of stay to pass through the centre - not seen guards in either of these configurations - unless you know different.

Suspect I will go with the majority on here and stick to some new 23mm tyres (though not totally sure which ones yet - Durano Plus which I already have, or new set or Vredestein Tricomp as the current pair have been great so far ) and the crud guards

Re: Cycling from Suffolk to Paris

12 April 2015 - 11:28am
Barrenfluffit wrote:Also the newhaven ferry is just about long enough to catch some rest and still be making ground. So it roughly goes ride down from london during the day, catch the evening ferry and set off again in the morning (probably with lights) to paris (129m).


I'm not saying don't do this route but having done it I definately wouldn't choose to do it again. Firstly the ferry was £30 in each direction and it leaves at a very unsociable 11pm meaning either a long wait in Newhaven which is a bit of a dump (sorry if you live there) or approaching at night along fast twisty country type roads. By the time you factor getting up to the ferry lounge getting settled in and the fact that your woken 45 minutes before docking with a VERY loud fog horn ( In my drowsy state I thought we were sinking!) getting any sort of worth while sleep is futile. Also you disembark at 4am which again means cycling in the dark feeling sleepy i.e. crap and seeing nothing or sleeping outside the closed Dieppe ferry terminal till light and getting moved on by a bemused cleaner. Only benefit was fresh coffee and a delicious croissant in a Dieppe town.
Anyway thats my tuppence worth!

Re: Dilema - mud-guards or wider tyres

12 April 2015 - 10:04am
bigjim wrote:One of the lads at the club runs his rear mudguard over the top of the brake bridge to achieve clearance. he just trims the guard with a stanley knife so it will fit between the narrow stays.
You can get rear mudguards that are in two sections, either with a bridge connecting the two sections over the top of the brake (eg Salmon) or with a section each side of the pinch point above the tyre.

Re: Has technology changed touring?

12 April 2015 - 1:11am
Cunobelin wrote:There is a another thread about the "Winged Wheels" and how this is being set up as a touring competition

It struck me as an example of how technology has changed cycle touring

When I first started this would have been announced in an newsletter, or by the DA

You would then write to the CTC at Godalming with an SAE and a week later would get a list of the known sites

If you found a new one then you would again write to the CTC who would then update the lists and ad a slip of paper to following lists with the addition.

However unless the addition was announced in the magazine or you replaced your list then you would never ever know of the addition


Now I just whip out my smartphone.................... Not only to I have an up to date list immediately available, I can check the one I have just found, take a photo, send it in and the addition can be available to all within minutes

We focus a lot on the GPS technology, but this is just one example of how technology has made a change.

Has Technology changed the way you tour?

Well, not quite but even a smart phone won't find a youth hostel that no longer exists. On the face of it, it isn't just the web that is useful to cycle tourists but the carryable device - the smart phone. It's almost as though they were designed for cycle tourists. But somehow they don't quite seem to make much of a difference. And they don't make up for the decimated YHA network. It's a moot point: such amazing technology, so little absolute need for it. It's kind of middling I suppose.

best audax/light touring disc wheelset ?

12 April 2015 - 12:44am
Have been looking at the Condor Fratello disc and similar bikes. I mainly want for audax type cycling, but I also want to do lightish packed touring ( I have a expedition type touring bike for heavy & rough stuff)

On the Condor, the shop has recommended for my price range the Mavic Askium one disc wheelset. Any views out there on their reliability & suitability for touring or suggestions on alternative 10 speed wheels that are lightish and maintainable. I'm not sure if I'm just being old fangled, but cartridge bearings and straight spokes just look like unnecessary complications with extra expense in repairs.

Anyway any advice ?

Re: North Sea Route - Norway (Kristiansand - Bergen)

11 April 2015 - 10:43pm
s_b: Thanks a lot for the info about Nedstrand, that actually sounds like a nice little detour! And thanks a lot for the reiseplanlegger website, that seems extremely helpful! And I will try to avoid Brusand camping!

Vorpal: thanks for the DNT link. Unfortunately, since we're mainly going along the coast I don't think we'll be able to use them too much. Too bad though, cause I love those kinds of huts.

Re: Mosquitos/Midges be afraid be very afraid Armageddon

11 April 2015 - 7:03pm
Midges can only fly at 4mph so if you keep cycling and never stop then you have no worries

I used to smoke but I still got bitten to hell. Tried DEET products, Avon, eating Marmite. Nothing worked except being totally covered in clothing with a Mosquito net covering my head

Re: 32, 34 or 36 cassette for Roux 250?

11 April 2015 - 6:21pm
On the spec it says Shimano Triple 50/39/30 octalink. Does this help? If not I'll look for part number on bike tomorrow when I'm home.

Thanks for helping!

L

Re: Cycling from Suffolk to Paris

11 April 2015 - 6:18pm
Also the newhaven ferry is just about long enough to catch some rest and still be making ground. So it roughly goes ride down from london during the day, catch the evening ferry and set off again in the morning (probably with lights) to paris (129m).

http://www.donaldhirsch.com/records.html

Re: 32, 34 or 36 cassette for Roux 250?

11 April 2015 - 6:12pm
Do you know what size the smallest chainring is and the BCD (Bolt Centre Diameter) for it's fittings. If you aren't sure then post the model of the chainset. Most Shimano components have code numbers, FC-????.

Re: 32, 34 or 36 cassette for Roux 250?

11 April 2015 - 5:58pm
Thanks Gaz, I have what the bike came with which is 3 front rings. When I searched for reviews, I found a couple of men who had changed to 34 which they said was better but hasn't found anyone who has changed to a 36, probably because of the technical advice you have given!

Re: Mosquitos/Midges be afraid be very afraid Armageddon

11 April 2015 - 5:32pm
DarkNewt wrote:I am going to be travelling around the coast from the 3rd of July and after reading someone describe the mozzies on Stornaway are the insect equivalent of Ninja's and other tales of people abandoning their bikes a la wasp attack jumping into rivers I am even more worried. So I have decided to go on the attack and prepare for my equivalent of MOSQUITO ARMAGEDDON!
Your concerns appear to be somewhat exaggerated, midgies are not mosquitos and mosquitos are not midgies, whoever suggested there were mosquitos in Stornoway was most likely talking of midgies whose bites are unlikely to cause any long term effect, unless you have some unusual allergy or medical condition. Midgies are more of a rural problem and not so often encountered in urban centres like Stornoway anyway.
It is most unlikely that anyone will be troubled by midgies while cycling, or when the wind speed exceeds 6mph. Avoiding exposure of bare skin when in typical midgie habitats is the primary defence.

You are more likely to encounter mosquitos in London than in Stornoway. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-27491891

Re: 32, 34 or 36 cassette for Roux 250?

11 April 2015 - 5:29pm
A quick google suggests the Roux 250 has an Acera rear mech.

Tech Docs for Acera RD-M360 show it has capacity for a 34T maximum rear sprocket. You might manage 36T but it's not designed to do it.

A new chain would be a good idea. First of all it will need to be longer to accomodate the larger sprocket, secondly new cassettes don't tend to work well with worn chains. The risk of having a chain that is too short to engage big sprocket and big chainring arises from an accidental shift to that combination. At best you'll come to a sudden halt ,most probably with some broken transmission parts. At worst the sudden halt will cause a tumble as well.

If you want lower gears a smaller front chainring may present an easier solution. What do you have currently?

32, 34 or 36 cassette for Roux 250?

11 April 2015 - 4:49pm
Hi, I have a Roux 250 and I'm keen to know if it will really help going up the mountains with 4 panniers if I change the current 32 speed cassette to a 34 or 36.

My bike shop said that the 36 was big for the bike but I want as much help getting up the mountains as possible as we cycle through France! They also said I would need a new chain and that with a 36 I wouldn't be able to use the front big and back big cogs together. Not sure this is a prob as I don't do that now!

I'm female, in my mid 50s so any advice is very gratefully received.

Thanks so much

Linda

Re: Dilema - mud-guards or wider tyres

11 April 2015 - 4:12pm
One of the lads at the club runs his rear mudguard over the top of the brake bridge to achieve clearance. he just trims the guard with a stanley knife so it will fit between the narrow stays.

Re: Front rack Advice

11 April 2015 - 4:01pm
I don't mean to hijack your thread but I was about to start a similar thread of my own. I am looking for a front rack for a Ridgeback Panorama and have read somewhere that some front racks have trouble mounting Ortlieb's.

Does anyone have experience with using Tubus on a Panorama with Ortliebs? And, which front racks are best for long distance touring, low riders or standard?

thanks in advance.

Oh yeah, I also found this link to Bike24 for a Tubus Tara at 48 Euro + 6 Euro delivery, which works out at about £40

https://www.bike24.com/p234485.html

Re: Advice sought on choosing a touring bike

11 April 2015 - 3:16pm
Just to add an update to this old thread - I recently had some spare time and have got the bike built up and road tested. At 1m 83 cm I have the 56cm Ridgeback Panorama and could still have dropped to the 54cm frame. The stem on the Panorama is quite long and I have read elsewhere that other riders have swapped this for a shorter stem - I might end up doing this but have only done 60 miles or so and the reach hasn't been an issue.

It feels like one of the best bikes I have ever ridden - brilliant gearing and comfortable sitting position. Considering the bike weighs about 13kg it doesn't feel that heavy because of the mtb gearing - that's new to me as someone that is switching from light road bikes!

I am already starting to question whether 28" wheels are going to be the best for long distance touring that might include slightly off road cycling. 26" wheel certainly offer more manoeuvrability, however this isn't a pressing concern for me as I have ridden with 28's for a long time before now.

The RB Pan also comes with STI gears and brake levers as well as two brake levers on the handlebar - this is a brilliant adaptation to the bike, very convenient.

Having only experienced this bike, I can't recommend it in comparison to other touring bikes, yet I can say with ease that should you buy a RB Pan then you won't be disappointed; a truly brilliant and well thought out bike!

Family cyle touring

11 April 2015 - 2:43pm
We're heading to France in the summer to cycle some of the Loire Valley. Bike-wise we're fine but we're trying to decide between taking bike seats for our two daughters (will be 3.5 and 1year when we go) or a cycle trailer for the both of them to sit in together.

Also, can anyone recommend any tents suitable for two adults, two children and all our stuff?

thanks!

Re: Mosquitos/Midges be afraid be very afraid Armageddon

11 April 2015 - 1:33pm
LollyKat wrote:The thing I find with clegs, though, is that they are so big and slow that you can usually whack them before they bite. And even if you don't spot them until you feel their teeth in your flesh, killing them immediately seems to prevent them leaving any irritating poisons behind It works for me, at least - I very rarely have reactions to cleg bites. Midgies are something else!

I wasn't so lucky. I did Dover to Cape Wrath in the heatwave of July 2013. No midges anywhere but the clegs were out in force. You can outrun them on a flat or downhill but they catch up with you on the uphill. They can bite through your clothing and land on your back where you can't get at them.

Amazing cycle though!

Re: Mosquitos/Midges be afraid be very afraid Armageddon

11 April 2015 - 11:16am
rannochraider wrote:I know there's not many of us do it nowadays but if you are a smoker you have won a watch with regards to midgie deterrents.
Very true. The only cigarette I have ever smoked was in France with a group of students at an outdoor do where we were being eaten alive by mozzies. All of us non-smokers were desperately cadging Gauloises from the smokers - definitely the lesser of two evils!

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