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Updated: 6 min 22 sec ago

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

17 October 2014 - 4:18pm
Psamathe wrote:Instead I got some bright orange t-shirts for a couple of £ from Amazon. Cool, bright, contrasting colour and does not scream "cyclist" (except that I also wear the lycra shorts ...).

Ian

Muddy Fox do a nice jersey (short sleeve and long sleeve) which are a non-flouro orange and quite cheap on eBay.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

17 October 2014 - 4:16pm
mjr wrote:Spinners wrote:Newsflash: We're a more vulnerable road user.
So? That only matters after the collision.



Prevention is better than cure/collision.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

17 October 2014 - 3:55pm
Spinners wrote:In my opinion, there's more chance of being noticed by wearing lighter, brighter colours but each to their own.

In the opinion of Ian Walker, based on considerable research, there's more chance of being seen by increasing the contrast from your background. So if your background is, say, a field of oil-seed rape in full bloom you'll stand out better in black than in yellow. If you're going past a row of white houses again the case that black is probably a good thing for visibility.

What hi-viz certainly does that started me wearing it is standing out at very long distances, but the more I thought about it the more I realised you don't get hit when folk are a long way away. I can't recall any incident (driving or riding) where I've suddenly come across a bike (or car) at short range because it wasn't a conspicuous colour (including plenty of "stealth cyclists"). I can recall those where something turned up out of a blind spot, or where my own observation had been poor. Hi-viz has no demonstrable track record there.

I've had two properly nasty collisions on bikes. On both occasions I was wearing "proper" cycling kit in bright colours with reflectives. I didn't get seen because the drivers didn't look (second case not really their fault, they were spinning out from another collision from a wholly different misjudgement...).

Another cycling acquaintance was rear-ended at a roundabout where he'd been stopped waiting for a gap in the traffic. He was driving a fire-engine at the time, which just goes to show easy it is to miss conspicuous things by not looking. If you do look then remarkably small and in some cases quite well camouflaged things can be seen, so cyclists aren't doomed by a lack of hi-viz.

Pete.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

17 October 2014 - 3:48pm
I gave up wearing my hi-vis yellow waistcoat last spring - mainly because with all the fields of hi-vis oil rape seed I thought it just helped me "blend-in"; as well as being an extra layer of plastic to get sweaty. Instead I got some bright orange t-shirts for a couple of £ from Amazon. Cool, bright, contrasting colour and does not scream "cyclist" (except that I also wear the lycra shorts ...).

Ian

The Struggle in lake district

17 October 2014 - 3:13pm
Hi

Probably daft question here, but I have cycled the "struggle" from the small roundabout out of Ambleside, Smuthy Row? And thought that was it, and been told it is, but....while walking in lakes last week I came down a road thinking flippin heck this looks a bugger, I will have to have a go at this, to only end up at the bottom of Kirkstone Road, nearby a gem shop I think. Went into a new bike shop in Ambleside (push it, I think it's called, nice place), where they told me yep what you just walked down is the struggle. But it wasn't the same road I went up when I cycled it before. Does it join up with the road from Smithy Row, as this " New" route I gave found looks even harder!!

Re: tablet for touring

17 October 2014 - 2:50pm
Many thanks to both of you.

Re: tablet for touring

17 October 2014 - 2:48pm
That's the very one.

Re: Chepstow to Portsmouth cycle route.

17 October 2014 - 2:21pm
Thanks all for your imput, it's given me a lot of helpful advice which I will consider strongly.
I'm nursing a serious case of road rash at the moment having fallen in Porthmadog on Sunday crossing the railway line. Wheel went into the groove, I was third in the peloton.
Thanks again,
Gethyn.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

17 October 2014 - 1:20pm
Spinners wrote:Newsflash: We're a more vulnerable road user.
So? That only matters after the collision.
In my opinion, there's more chance of being noticed by wearing lighter, brighter colours but each to their own.
You're welcome to your opinion and to keep wearing today's socially-acceptable Yellow Badge. I'll keep following the evidence by concentrating on lights and reflectors, instead of fretting about my usual lovely warm dark-coloured clothes that are also good off the bike.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

17 October 2014 - 12:58pm
Why does wearing black matter if I have lights on my bike?

Lots of Hi-Viz people still get knocked down by cars.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

17 October 2014 - 12:55pm
I'd take a cheap pair of battery lights. Head torches are unlikely to be illegal and can annoy others, it wouldn't help anybody approaching you from the rear either. Lights on the handlebars or fork crown will normally clear front panniers. As for the rear, quite a few are made which fit onto your pannier carrier or mudguards. Many of these have a reflector included with the light. Pedal reflectors or reflective ankle bands (if you ride clipless pedals) may also provide a worthwhile increase in conspicuity in vehicle headlights.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

17 October 2014 - 12:51pm
mjr wrote:Spinners wrote:I find the use of all black cycle clothing baffling and see so many cyclists dressed like this nowadays.
If you see them, it can't be so bad for visibility Do you find the continuing use of black cars baffling, too?



Newsflash: We're a more vulnerable road user.

In my opinion, there's more chance of being noticed by wearing lighter, brighter colours but each to their own.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

17 October 2014 - 12:44pm
Unless you plan to ride much at night a battery rear light on the rack and a decent head torch should suffice. That's what I've used on about 10k miles of touring in the USA.

Other advice - use a mirror. Most drivers are OK but you will get a few close passes and they are less frightening when you see them coming. I twice had to ride off the road on to gravel to avoid being hit when drivers refused to slow down when oncoming traffic prevented an overtake. Both times in full daylight and straight roads.

Re: Trains in Europe

17 October 2014 - 12:37pm
The only nearly 100% reliable search method I have found is the DB Bahn website as mentioned above, using the further search options. Here's the link: http://reiseauskunft.bahn.de/bin/query2 ... ountry=GBR

You won't necessarily be able to book online though.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

17 October 2014 - 12:28pm
I think all Ortlieb panniers have bits of reflective material on them in strategic places, mine show up extremely well in headlights. I also have a big reflector on the back, with just a basic LED rear light that clips on the back of a dry bag.

I don't take a front light - my headtorch is quite powerful and can easily be slipped on to the handlebar bag, so it even looks like a proper bike light in countries where that sort of thing is required. When touring I cycle so little in low light conditions that I really don't want to take any more than the strict minimum.

Re: tablet for touring

17 October 2014 - 12:17pm
I have this keyboard for my Nexus 7 2, its great because it clips over the screen to form a carry case.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bluetooth-Keybo ... B00F35ZVI8

Al

Re: Poncho

17 October 2014 - 12:07pm
Well, I went into Millets, looked at the £3 Ponchos and bought two. We are off to Cyprus doing a bit of walking next week and these Ponchos will be fine if we have some light rain. The material is rather like the old Pakamac, dark green, quite light and fairly durable, important for doing a bit of walking, and would be just great for wild cycle camping. They are better than the really thin pound shop ones, which are sort of single use throw away jobs, but not as thick as my tropical one I got from Costa Rica years ago. (Frequent heavy rain there)

Pound shop Poncho 50g
Millets £3 Poncho 350g
Costa Rican tropical Poncho 550g

Take your pick Sweep!

Al

Re: Dry bags - a lightweight alternative to panniers

17 October 2014 - 11:45am
Ive always used drybags when on tour - to supplement my four panniers - on the rear rack and contain things that either i'm not too bothered about getting wet and my waterproofs - to me all this light stuff has one drawback - durability - I suppose a simple trade off - 20km a day? - im happy to average a 100/day - most of my stuff has done a couple of hundred days on the road and still have at least another couple of hundred days left in them

Re: tablet for touring

17 October 2014 - 11:39am
Sorry I don't have it with me right now. I will post more details later. It was about ten quid I think.

Re: Dry bags - a lightweight alternative to panniers

17 October 2014 - 10:13am
bigjim wrote:I have toured a few times using a Carradice Overlander bag. It weighs about 300g including the straps, I like the square shape. It has padding on the back so sits nicely on a rack. It also doubles as a rucksack and the shoulder straps are removeable to use to tie to the rack. It's better than a sack as it has a big zip around the front and can easily slide your hand in for items. I put items in plastic bags for ease of accessability. It also means you can strap a tent etc to the flat surface. I reckon it's easily about 26litre.
That looks a very neat solution bigjim.

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