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C2C vs Hadrian's cycleway?

31 January 2016 - 7:53pm
Hi!

We are hoping to do a three day tour over Easter, either the C2C route from Sunderland to Whitehaven, OR... the Hadrian's Wall cycleway (east to west). Both routes look fantastic.

- Are both ok on road bikes?

- Which is the more spectacular or challenging?

We would be really interested to hear any strong views on one or the other!

Many thanks!

Re: touring and flying with hydraulic disc brakes

31 January 2016 - 7:48pm
pete75 wrote:Tiberius wrote: I can tell you this if your brakes fail at the wrong time and in the wrong place it may stop you doing anything apart from being put in a box and shoved in the ground.

So, BOTH brakes fail....'at the wrong time' (Me....at the SAME time ?????......Worry Worry Worry !!!!!!)

Seriously ...YOU....CAN ....NOT ...BE ....SERIOUS !!!! *

*jonny Mac ....Wimbledon.....Ages ago......

Re: Dog trailers

31 January 2016 - 7:32pm
Or this...(I'm impressed with your rotovator exploits btw)

Re: To the bottom tip of Sicily

31 January 2016 - 7:18pm
A sunny and a pretty mild day, this one was the weather today January the 31st, notoriously one of the coldest days the year round. "The bottom tip of Sicily", better known as "Isola delle Correnti" has finally been reached.

In short I'll prepare a complete report, either in Italian and English, on this "winter cycle trip" that, as far as I'm concerned, has been one of my best ones.



Re: Dog trailers

31 January 2016 - 7:05pm
Have you seen this blog http://dogontour.co.uk/
Looks like a Golden Retriever.

Re: touring and flying with hydraulic disc brakes

31 January 2016 - 7:01pm
I've never had a single problem hydraulic brakes, they are a very very simple device, true seals could blow but usually this would not be a catastrophic failure and would be caught with routine Maintenance. Spares could easily be lighter than those require for cable brakes ( seals, a few olives and oil)
While I have heard of hydraulics failing on long descents most of the problems seem to be related to poor equipment choice,don't use tiny light weight aftermarket rotors on touring or heavily loaded bikes, I use Shimano slx brakes on my dummy and have never suffered from fade even loaded up to an estimated 100lbs at speeds of up to 50mph.
Mechanical brakes can also fail, cables can snap etc

While not a road or touring sample very few respondents on this thread had many problems
http://forums.mtbr.com/brake-time/anyon ... 26367.html

This was extracted from http://velonews.competitor.com/2013/11/ ... red_308954

Obviously, any sort of fade is highly dangerous. But discs are not the only brake system that will fail with excessive heat. SRAM was able to blow a tire off its rim after five minutes at 550 watts (on a dynamo tester), but saw zero damage to its disc brakes after 12 minutes at 800 watts. In other words, if you’ve never blown a tire off a rim due to heat, you’ll certainly never boil your road discs

Basically I think hydraulic brakes are a lot more reliable than some think.

Re: America: the bizarre

31 January 2016 - 5:39pm
Pete Jack wrote:I wouldn't recommend a tour of Scotland to include East Kilbride either. I don't live far from Skid Row (the 'skid' refers to a chute they slid logs down about 120 years ago). The only cyclist I know who has come to harm in that area hit a manhole and fell off and broke his hip. The road surfaces around there were terrible. But lately the whole city is getting a lot more bike friendly. What's your point? Every biggish city on the planet has areas it's best to stay to stay away from. I once got my pocket picked in Valence, France. Does that mean the whole country should be avoided? In Normandy I had a gang of hooligans in a car slowing down and yelling at me, quite scary, until I realized they were trying to stop me riding down the on ramp to an N road.

On what basis would you not recommend East Kilbride?
This thread is largely about personal safety, not scenic or cultural highlights.
East kilbride is pefectly safe, but certainly not a tourist honeypot! Although being on a Sustrans national cycle network route makes it quite likely that some cycle tourists will pass through on their journeys.

Re: touring and flying with hydraulic disc brakes

31 January 2016 - 5:39pm
Tiberius wrote:I'm a dead simple bloke.....

I choose my brakes by how quickly they slow me down. NOT by how easy/difficult/possibly/maybe/probably/worry worry worry they can be fixed 'by the side of the road'....

I'm fairly new to cycling ( I have a motorcycling background ...I've toured the world on 'em ) So, serious question for all you 'experienced' cycling bods......Has a major tour on a push bike EVER IN THE HISTORY OF THIS PLANET come to an end due to brake failure ???...

I can tell you this with 100% certainty, it would not stop me doing anything.....

It would stop you stopping

You can probably tell, I have a VERY low tolerance of chronic pessimisim !!!.....
You'll come across a bit of it on here,It's known as a difference of opinion

Re: America: the bizarre

31 January 2016 - 5:30pm
Pete Jack wrote:TonyR wrote:Pete Jack wrote:Would you extend that to tourist cycling through Skid Row or Florencia in LA? I agree with you in general but there are places you would be advised to stay clear of as a tourist unless accompanied by an experienced guide, I wouldn't recommend a tour of Scotland to include East Kilbride either. I don't live far from Skid Row (the 'skid' refers to a chute they slid logs down about 120 years ago). The only cyclist I know who has come to harm in that area hit a manhole and fell off and broke his hip. The road surfaces around there were terrible. But lately the whole city is getting a lot more bike friendly. What's your point? Every biggish city on the planet has areas it's best to stay to stay away from. I once got my pocket picked in Valence, France. Does that mean the whole country should be avoided? In Normandy I had a gang of hooligans in a car slowing down and yelling at me, quite scary, until I realized they were trying to stop me riding down the on ramp to an N road.

Earlier in this thread I foolishly expressed the view (which I am now happy to modify) that American streets are not safe. I now accept that I was over-generalising and that it is possible to select safe-ish roads there. But it would be very "head-in the sand" to ignore the fact that the US has a murder rate substantially greater than that in the UK or any other Western European country. In the light of that, making a point of visiting run-down urban areas (as the OP suggests) seems like something that should only be done with care, if at all. After all, if most of the USA is no more dangerous than the UK (as some seem to suggest) the high murder rate must be concentrated somewhere.

Re: touring and flying with hydraulic disc brakes

31 January 2016 - 5:24pm
Why worry about fixing something that is unlikely to break and if it does its not critical?

Re: touring and flying with hydraulic disc brakes

31 January 2016 - 5:23pm
If you worry about technology braking I would leave the gears behind as well. They are far more fragile that hydraulic discs. In the decade and a half or there abouts I haven't broken or even mildly injured hydraulic discs on my MTB which gets way more hard use than any tour I bet. No MTBer would be without them unless they have a fetish for old style stuff ( not a bad idea actually) or they want to be able to hand forge a spare part from a Mongolian soup plate. Its only a brake. If you snap one off you walk down a hill.
Having used cable discs on my roughstuff bikes for 6 years I would swear by them. Over Xmas I swapped the road bike from cable to hydro discs and by god they are better. If you are starting from scratch price up hydros then cables plus the shifters. They won't be far apart.
Of course you will have the problem that no hydro road system plays with triple chainsets if that's what you need.

Re: America: the bizarre

31 January 2016 - 5:17pm
TonyR wrote:Pete Jack wrote:Would you extend that to tourist cycling through Skid Row or Florencia in LA? I agree with you in general but there are places you would be advised to stay clear of as a tourist unless accompanied by an experienced guide, I wouldn't recommend a tour of Scotland to include East Kilbride either. I don't live far from Skid Row (the 'skid' refers to a chute they slid logs down about 120 years ago). The only cyclist I know who has come to harm in that area hit a manhole and fell off and broke his hip. The road surfaces around there were terrible. But lately the whole city is getting a lot more bike friendly. What's your point? Every biggish city on the planet has areas it's best to stay to stay away from. I once got my pocket picked in Valence, France. Does that mean the whole country should be avoided? In Normandy I had a gang of hooligans in a car slowing down and yelling at me, quite scary, until I realized they were trying to stop me riding down the on ramp to an N road.

Re: Cinelli hobootleg with columbus rustproof steel

31 January 2016 - 5:16pm
Neil C wrote:Cinelli website says "Frame and fork are made by triple butted Columbus Cromor steel with a special protective electro deposition paint treatment inside and outside the tubes for a total protection against corrosion and extreme reliability."

http://www.cinelli.it/site/index.php?pa ... t&Itemid=9

I'll take it is Cataphoresis. Used in cars, not much on bicycles but it seems to work well so my take is that isn't used to cut costs. I.e. Scapin steel bikes had that treatment and it worked.

Re: touring and flying with hydraulic disc brakes

31 January 2016 - 5:07pm
I'm a dead simple bloke.....

I choose my brakes by how quickly they slow me down. NOT by how easy/difficult/possibly/maybe/probably/worry worry worry they can be fixed 'by the side of the road'....

I'm fairly new to cycling ( I have a motorcycling background ...I've toured the world on 'em ) So, serious question for all you 'experienced' cycling bods......Has a major tour on a push bike EVER IN THE HISTORY OF THIS PLANET come to an end due to brake failure ???...

I can tell you this with 100% certainty, it would not stop me doing anything.....

You can probably tell, I have a VERY low tolerance of chronic pessimisim !!!.....

Bike Hire Somme France

31 January 2016 - 4:52pm
Hiya,

Does anyone know where I could hire a couple of hybrids in the Somme area, France in August?

Thank you

David

Re: d lock for touring?

31 January 2016 - 4:31pm
The Missus and I take two armoured heavy duty cable type locks which can be linked together to form one long length that is really handy for locking two bikes to a hefty tree. But they are heavy. And no lock is 100%.

Dog trailers

31 January 2016 - 3:17pm
Hi Everyone. Has anyone had any experience with dog trailers. We have decided to take our pooches with us on tour, as we cant find anyone to look after them and kennels are not an option. I have seen peoples' tour blogs who have used the Cycle Tote trailers and love the look of it, but as we don't know yet whether our pooches will take to a trailer, I am loath to spend that sort of money just yet. I have been looking at the various types available in the UK, but have yet to see one in the flesh as there are no suppliers close to us. As such, I find it hard to gauge the sturdiness and suitability for our dogs. I have a golden retriever and an aging patterdale terrier. I am inclined to buy a cheaper trailer and practice with it for a while, but am totally undecided as to which to get. Ideally, I'd like to get both dogs in one trailer, but recognise that for a tour they will probably need their own. I have been looking at the Trixie large dog trailer on Amazon, which seems to have good reviews. Any ideas or experiences would be greatly appreciated. If anyone has one for sale, I'd be interested.

Re: touring and flying with hydraulic disc brakes

31 January 2016 - 3:16pm
I've never had the problem you mention,with cable disc brakes.

My point was that cable discs are easier to contend with by the roadside,should I need to.

Re: touring and flying with hydraulic disc brakes

31 January 2016 - 3:12pm
Have done 2 to 4 week tours every year for last 15 years on a slicked mountain bike with hydraulic brakes in Norway, France, Spain & Italy. No issues with reliability & no problems with long descents from high passes (e.g. Cime de Bonnet 2802m). Like anything else can get them checked out before setting off.

Also very happy with my Ultregra dual pivots on my unloaded road bike on similar descents

Airlines happy to take them. Have used EasyJet, SAS, KLM, Ryanair & Jet2. EasyJet state on their website that hydraulic brakes & suspensions are fine.

Not sure if this helps but never having had a sudden failure when mountain biking I've never thought they would be an issue

Re: Dutch tulip fields

31 January 2016 - 3:03pm
Marten,

Even close to your home in Groningen, you can find them.


East of Eenum

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