CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition

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Updated: 1 hour 9 min ago

Re: Default tourer?

14 December 2014 - 1:04am
Si wrote:Well, it certainly ain't the Galaxy any more!
And not for a long time!

Although, not that I've really counted, but I think I see more Thorns than Surlys on the road.
That could be a matter of geography,not that I've anything against Thorn IMO they're good bikes,but at around £320 for a frameset SurlyLHT and DT's are pretty good value for a well thought out bit of kit.
Built up with kit of choice and such a bike is a world beater IMO, that most definitely won't break the bank.

Re: Default tourer?

14 December 2014 - 12:57am
Heltor Chasca wrote:......... And I will die upon my steed...hc

I sincerely hope you don't.

Re: What are your essentials to go bicycle touring?

13 December 2014 - 10:31pm
thirdcrank wrote:Nobody seems to have mentioned CTC membership. Once upon a time, the CTC Handbook would have been tucked away in a side pocket on the Camper Longflap.

You mean like:

DSCF1239.JPG

With essential touring information like:

DSCF1240.JPG

With other useful information like:

DSCF1243.JPG

My copies are all a bit out of date now though

Re: Default tourer?

13 December 2014 - 10:15pm
I can't fault mine. Flawless handling loaded or unloaded. Clearance for 700x42s and mudguards though I run 700x35s. Great choice of sizes. 26" or 700c.

Much better handling than the 531ST Galaxy it replaced. The only "flaw" may be that it is a loaded touring bike. Light riders might find it too stiff unloaded. So it isn't a do-it-all bike.

nowhere.JPG

Re: Best way / courier to get 1x bike to the USA?

13 December 2014 - 9:22pm
If you fly BA bikes just gets treated as a bag. If this means you have two bags it is cheaper to pay for additional bag in advance on line rather than at airport.

Re: What are your essentials to go bicycle touring?

13 December 2014 - 9:21pm
For me I wouldn't want to go touring without a camera.
I wouldn't enjoy a days cycling if I hadn't had a good nights sleep, so my exped mat and down quilt are near the top of the list.
And although I risk getting burnt at the stake, my Garmin has transformed the way I tour, I wouldn't want to be without it.

Re: Default tourer?

13 December 2014 - 9:03pm
Well, it certainly ain't the Galaxy any more!

Although, not that I've really counted, but I think I see more Thorns than Surlys on the road.

Re: Default tourer?

13 December 2014 - 8:20pm
Disc trucker too. All that juvenile surliness on their site is all a marketing smoke screen. They have really sat down and thought things through. Amazing bikes. I have one. And I will die upon my steed...hc

Re: Touring in remote locations - advice please

13 December 2014 - 8:18pm
mercalia wrote:what about snakes? any one mention them here?

Not to mention scorpions in the deserts in the southwest. Shake shoes out in the morning before putting them on. I thought this was a joke when someone told me but it's on the Park Service website. Though in the USA scorpion bites are only life threatening to children, the elderly or hyper-sensitive people.

http://www.nature.nps.gov/biology/ipm/m ... piders.cfm

yuhadesert2.jpg

Re: Pennsylvania

13 December 2014 - 8:10pm
raybo wrote:...
... excellent links, thanks a lot.

shane wrote:... after a long day in the saddle its quiet a pain to walk endlessly around the supermarket looking for the beer section...
... I pretty well understand what you're meaning, fortunately I drink only wine ... and sometimes water as well

Re: Default tourer?

13 December 2014 - 7:48pm
Surly certainly hit the jackpot with it, right bike, right time, right price and some great marketing. I suspect many of those on that site are American, where it's a real bargain, I don't think they have the choice we do.

Re: Touring in remote locations - advice please

13 December 2014 - 7:23pm
good point... a snake bite kit is probably a good thing to carry.

Default tourer?

13 December 2014 - 7:17pm
On a very cold day I've been browsing the Fully Loaded website.
Going off the number of photos of Surly LHT's on the site gallery,is it the default touring bike and does it deserve the accolade?

Re: Touring in remote locations - advice please

13 December 2014 - 4:30pm
what about snakes? any one mention them here?

Re: What are your essentials to go bicycle touring?

13 December 2014 - 12:22pm
AntonioCM wrote:Hi guys,

I am not a gear geek, but I reckon there are still some material possessions I think I couldn’t go bicycle touring without.

Antonio

Antonio

I get the strong impression that what you really cannot do without is your underwear:

http://www.theadventurejunkies.com/worl ... ra-mexico/

I don't blame you but you did ask.

san javier

13 December 2014 - 11:05am
hi all
looking for road bike routes in this area preferably loops starting from the san javier area or there abouts
any help would be appreciated. Not busy roads please. trying also to find tour of murcia route but no luck.
ta

Re: Touring in remote locations - advice please

13 December 2014 - 10:05am
you're on a bike,you break down,you can't fix it...you're out in the bush...most Americans will stop and ask you if you're okay if they see you in some difficulty. They're most supporting with only the odd nutter whose aim is to kill you. Most(read x10)are very helpful,moreso than our own folk. You could always flag down a car or lorry should you think you'll need it. A lot of Americans(in the bush)have utes: bike KO'd,they'll put your bike in the back and take you and bike to the nearest town,see you're okay.

What I would take with you,buy over there,is that pepper spray. Not for bears,but for the dogs that are out on remote farms and hear/smell you coming. With no owners around,or gone out shopping,they can beat a path down to the road to savage you(?)should they catch you. The dogs seem to bark up the valleys to alert other farm dogs,then they're all on the look out foryou. I always lived/cycled in fear,but then I'm no commando. Yeah,they increased my cadence,but I never forgave them(or my fear?)for inhibiting carefree cycling. I'd rather face the bears and the pumas.

Re: Pennsylvania

13 December 2014 - 9:38am
The most important thing you need to know about PA is that they have funny booze laws. After a long day in the saddle its quiet a pain to walk endlessly around the supermarket looking for the beer section......

They only sell beer at bars(obvious) and off licenses/bottle shops (often not conveniently next to the supermarket!!!). Not the end of the world if you already know this, but quite a pain the first time you get caught out

Its a pretty part of the world, sadly I was in a bit of a hurry when I passed through, luckily you're also towards the top of the Appalachians so the hills aren't too bad. Have a good look at google maps and you'll see that a lot of the roads run NE-SW, theres a reason for that

Have fun.

Re: What are your essentials to go bicycle touring?

13 December 2014 - 9:36am
Nobody seems to have mentioned CTC membership. Once upon a time, the CTC Handbook would have been tucked away in a side pocket on the Camper Longflap.

Re: Touring in remote locations - advice please

13 December 2014 - 8:59am
I agree with most of the previous posts.

The one thing I would carry, though, having been stuck out overnight in remote areas once or twice, is a basic 'survival kit'
-small container of waterproof matches
-water purification tablets (or filter)
-emergency blanket/bivvy bag &/or bin bag (the large, heavy duty sort)
-a days worth of emergency rations or spare food
-an extra layer of warm clothes

If you are going across mountains, be aware of the symptoms of altitude sickness, and carry extra water, plus electrolyte tablets or drops.

A survival course is probably unnecessary, even if you get stuck out somewhere. However, if you have never been camping, and haven't built a fire with found wood, or improvised a shelter, a survival course might not be a bad idea. The chances that you will ever need it are slim, but if you do, basic knowledge and skills can make the difference between life and death.

It's not common, but it happens that someone gets a puncture, or has a mechanical, or gets lost and cannot get to the destination for the night. If it happens in a remote area, you need to be able to look after yourselves.

If you are going to truly remote areas, and you are worried about this, you can also get an emergency beacon (PLB).

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