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Updated: 33 min 17 sec ago

Re: Nutrition during P-B-P

31 August 2015 - 5:29pm
Eat whatever i fancy, but be prepared to find at some stage you may not want to eat, this happened to me on LEL, could not quite put a finger on it but was not able to eat.... then suddenly decided i wanted alka seltzer.... heaven knows why as i could not remember the last time i had dosed myself (if ever) with it, found a shop, added to water bottle, began to feel better and hungry.......... did not look back after that......

Re: Scottish weather has me freaked out!

31 August 2015 - 5:07pm
Jim's absolutely right about keeping warm and dry in the wet. I'd add a good pair of sealskinz (waterproof) gloves to that as well, nothing better than warm dry hands, you can cycle forever like that, good waterproofs and warm hards! [emoji4] http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/category/ ... ves-33648/

Re: Scottish weather has me freaked out!

31 August 2015 - 4:54pm
rualexander wrote:July and August are rarely very good months to cycle or camp in Scotland (especially the west), the last two summers were exceptions, much better to go in May, June, or September, although this year even they were pretty poor, April was quite good though.
If I were you, I'd wait until September if possible, less midgies then too.
yip may , or june my best bet , but you will never know here

Re: Scottish weather has me freaked out!

31 August 2015 - 3:44pm
Jimstar79 wrote:robing wrote:I'm heading up to the Hebrides on Thursday. Outer first, then inner. Hoping for some better weather and I'll be camping all the way!

Hey Robin,

Great stuff! I hope you get some good weather - if you get the same as me then you'll have a brilliant time. And, if it does rain, try your best to not let it spoil your time. As long as you are warm then being wet isn't or shouldn't be detrimental to having a good time. Being warm and wet makes all the difference! Make sure you keep dry clothes in dry bags <obviously>! I also found listening to music whilst cycling in the rain made a massive difference. You have to keep telling yourself, this is my adventure and I am going to enjoy it - I'm cycling in Scotland, which is far better than being at work or sitting in a house!!

Another word of advice, if you do find yourself in grim weather keep an eye on your rims and chain and try to keep them clean!

Enjoy it, mate!

Thanks Jim. Do you have a blog or photos of your tour? I'd love to see them. I agree re music, I always listen to it when I'm cycling. I have done some pretty wet cycling in Ireland and LEJOG. So long as it's not day after day. But praying that September will bring some better weather. Driving to Oban then Outer Hebrides first, Skye-Ardnamurchan-Mull. I know the Inner Hebrides and Mull in particular very well, but never been to the Outer Hebrides. Really looking forward to it, should be quieter at least now the schools gone back (actually they go back earlier in Scotland anyway), and should be quite relaxed in terms of mileage, aiming for about average of 35 miles a day.

Re: Scottish weather has me freaked out!

31 August 2015 - 3:39pm
tyreon wrote:Pray you get good weather...And I mean it!!

If you don't...picture of yous drenched and miserable by your tent,please. When I'm trapped in my house and it's rainin...I know I'm better off than yourself!!

Ha ha! I can't say I enjoy getting drenched, but fingers crossed for some better weather in September.

Re: garmin map for France

31 August 2015 - 2:55pm
I used Velomaps which I also loaded onto the computer, so they can be put a microSD card via Basemap to the GPS or in a card reader directly.

https://www.velomap.org/download/odbl/

They were particularly good for showing the cyclepaths which were frequently good enough to use and even on occasions preferable to the roads!

Probably the same mapping as the openfietsmap anyway.

Re: garmin map for France

31 August 2015 - 2:48pm
You can scroll down to the worldwide page and select the tiles which you wish for a more specific map of a country or region but that has extra steps involved.

Re: garmin map for France

31 August 2015 - 2:30pm
bohrsatom wrote:Openfietsmap - http://www.openfietsmap.nl/ It's free, just download and put on an SD card, and much better than the Garmin maps for cycling.And another vote. Note that the map is for western Europe so you can venture into the other countries too.

Re: Nutrition during P-B-P

31 August 2015 - 2:03pm
I've never done PBP nor LEL. I don't honestly think I would enjoy something like that. That said, I have done some long distance rides. My advice: eat everything you can. If someone puts food in front of you, eat it. If you see food, eat it. Carry something for between controls, and an emergency reserve (i.e. something you don't think you will ened, but carry just in case). My usuall emergency reserve is a couple of bananas and some powdered energy drink mix (to add to water). I don't usually use energy drink, but it can be a useful boost if I start to feel in danger of the bonk.

Good luck

Re: Nutrition during P-B-P

31 August 2015 - 1:50pm
My typical meal at controls:



The chicken was usually dry & inedible, the fish was OK, the bolognese at Villaines was excellent. The free roadside crèpes were grand, mainly for the atmosphere and the goodwill, and the coffee was a medical necessity.

On the bike I had crystallized ginger (favourite peccadillo) & mini-salami in the HB bag - delicious together. I also took a load of bars with me and ate about three.

I started with two bottles, rear one plain water, front one with Isostar in, but when I took on water I just topped this up and didn't add anything. From around Villaines I rode on plain water, emptying the back bidon to save weight.

Main principles I stuck to were not eating lots of fast carbs without adding something full of protein & maybe fat (e.g. the salami) to keep the glycaemic index down and avoid insulin reactions / gut problems. A lot of folk complained about getting gastric problems & blamed the toilets (which weren't great, but that's what you get when you put 6000 people through the average school's toilet facilities), but you can give yourself an explosive gut simply through over-consumption of energy products. My guts remained stable the whole time, and I filled my bottles wherever tapwater was available. I also avoided Coke - that's coffee in the picture.

Re: garmin map for France

31 August 2015 - 1:33pm
bohrsatom wrote:Openfietsmap - http://www.openfietsmap.nl/

It's free, just download and put on an SD card, and much better than the Garmin maps for cycling.
Another vote for the above

Re: garmin map for France

31 August 2015 - 1:32pm
Openfietsmap - http://www.openfietsmap.nl/

It's free, just download and put on an SD card, and much better than the Garmin maps for cycling.

Re: Scottish weather has me freaked out!

31 August 2015 - 12:37pm
robing wrote:I'm heading up to the Hebrides on Thursday. Outer first, then inner. Hoping for some better weather and I'll be camping all the way!

Hey Robin,

Great stuff! I hope you get some good weather - if you get the same as me then you'll have a brilliant time. And, if it does rain, try your best to not let it spoil your time. As long as you are warm then being wet isn't or shouldn't be detrimental to having a good time. Being warm and wet makes all the difference! Make sure you keep dry clothes in dry bags <obviously>! I also found listening to music whilst cycling in the rain made a massive difference. You have to keep telling yourself, this is my adventure and I am going to enjoy it - I'm cycling in Scotland, which is far better than being at work or sitting in a house!!

Another word of advice, if you do find yourself in grim weather keep an eye on your rims and chain and try to keep them clean!

Enjoy it, mate!

Re: Bought the bike!

31 August 2015 - 12:15pm
Hi Thistle

I'm mostly a road rider, and my Mercian had an expensive repaint (at Mercian) a few years back, so I tend to keep that bike to roads for fear of stone chips. However, I'd ride other, similar bikes on tracks without worrying about it. The frame construction is as strong as anything available, and wheels with 32 or (preferably) 36 spokes are going to stand up to most things.

Where suspension really comes in is in bouncing over boulders and the like, that can knock steering off track or stop you dead. You certainly couldn't do some of the down-hill racing that now goes on using a rigid frame. On the other hand, look at cyclo-cross for an example of racing off road on various terrains - the classic example being the Three Peaks. That branch of the sport does now allow MTBs, but pre-dates them by decades, and serious competitors still choose cyclo-cross designs, which are modified conventional bikes.

Or Paris Roubaix, the classic event in which road bikes are ridden flat out over cobbles that hammer man and machine to pieces. I don't think any photo can do justice to the battering that (most) bikes survive - and these really are lightweight road bikes, with minimal concessions to the surface (wider tyres than normal, and so on). And it's not just professionals, who can get issued with new bikes afterwards - there's an event for amateur riders too.

You'll notice that the one modification that isn't mentioned in that cyclo-cross article is making the bike stronger, because that's simply not necessary. OK, you probably shouldn't take your lightest racing wheels or ultra-light road frame off road, but carbon frames are certainly used now, and we're talking about 531 steel, which will have no problem (boulders and stupidly steep drops excepted).

Remember, when riding on tracks, to use your arms as part of the suspension system. Relax your arms, do not lock them, and let the bike find the way. The top half of your body will then behave as though you're riding the latest hi-tech MTB forks.

Re: Nutrition during P-B-P

31 August 2015 - 10:35am
Paulatic wrote:Its a wee ride happens every four years. Paris-Brest-Paris

http://www.paris-brest-paris.org/index2 ... page=edito

Thank you!

Re: Bought the bike!

31 August 2015 - 10:33am
Thanks Drossall! Did you stick to roads or did you go on paths as well?

Re: garmin map for France

31 August 2015 - 10:29am
Garmin City Navigator is for the whole of Europe these days.
https://buy.garmin.com/en-GB/GB/maps/on ... d6299.html
Not cheap, but it comes on a Micro SD card so you can put it into any Garmin device.

garmin map for France

31 August 2015 - 10:22am
Hi

I will be cycling with some friends through France in about 2 1/2 weeks and we are using Garmin sat navs and maps. I don't have a France/Europe card for my 705, I can get one from Garmin (eg. via Amazon) for £30. Ridewithgps do their own but it seems that their cards cover maps across two areas (central and western Europe, so cutting right across France, not good).

Anyone any suggestions for getting maps?

thanks

Martin

Re: Scottish weather has me freaked out!

31 August 2015 - 8:18am
Pray you get good weather...And I mean it!!

If you don't...picture of yous drenched and miserable by your tent,please. When I'm trapped in my house and it's rainin...I know I'm better off than yourself!!

Re: Nutrition during P-B-P

31 August 2015 - 8:09am
Its a wee ride happens every four years. Paris-Brest-Paris

http://www.paris-brest-paris.org/index2 ... page=edito

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