CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition

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Re: Would this bike be a suitable entry level tourer

23 min 4 sec ago
tm2383: this bike weighs 18 kg. A better (more expensive) touring bike will weigh around 14 kg, possibly less. Even trekking bikes come in at that price and weigh only 14 kg. E.g. http://dawescycles.com/product/mojave-gents/.

So you have to decide whether that extra 4 kg matters - for many people it's the weight of their tent and sleeping bag combined and more.

But I think more important is how far you want to travel in a day. If you are planning on tow paths and camping and keping to say 30 - 40 miles per day then this bike is OK but higher mileages may need a lighter bike (and no suspension).

That rack by the way will take 25 kg but that might not be over rough ground day after day. If you need a front rack then suspension causes complications.

Re: Would this bike be a suitable entry level tourer

40 min 45 sec ago
I've seen people touring on all manner of bikes from carbon road bikes (with rucksack) to heavily laden Dutch roadsters.
If the bike is reliable and your itinerary isn't too ambitious I'm sure a "city bike" would be ok.
I've not used a bike with suspension but I'm sure that Sweep is right in this regard.

Touring possibly the South of France along the coast

1 hour 4 min ago
I am looking to do a two week cycling holiday with a friend at the begining of May. Last year we did some of the veloldysee and really enjoyed it so this year we wanted to try somewhere else in France. We both want to be by the sea and somewhere warm so the obvious choice at this time of year is the South of France but we cant see any obvious cycle routes. Does anyone know of any that they have enjoyed? We need somewhere quite flat as I am just recovering from chemo and not up for huge hills. We are also planning on using camp sites.If not the South of France, does anybody have any other suggestions? Any other destinations that might fit the bill? We want to go by train as we want to use our own bikes and dont want to fly. Thanks

Re: Reducing pannier weight

3 hours 45 min ago
Vantage wrote:I've yet to put my theory into practice, but I've a spare pair of walking shoes in the pannier so that when I reach the campsite after a wet rainy ride, I have something dry to put on while the spd shoes dry out (hopefully).
I take some Goretex spats to keep the worst wet off the cycling shoes which works surprisingly well. The 'camp' shoes are easily dried so its no problem if i end up puddle hopping off the bike!

Re: Touring frame differences

4 hours 9 min ago
531colin is clearly right to say that you need to find a good set-up on your existing bike so that you have something to duplicate with a new one. That is how I measure up on the rare occasion that I go buying.

My touring bike has been much mucked about to get it right. It now has a very short upward angled stem to get the reach right and the bars at the right height. It now feels perfect, and when I built up a new bike a couple of years ago I carefully reproduced the same position, to within a few mm, and it felt right as soon as I sat on it.

Even a good bike will feel wrong of you are too stretched out or the saddle is not quite in the right position.

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

4 hours 16 min ago
This fit problem afflicts me too. I’m about 1.77 or 1.78 m with an 87 cm cycling inseam – not freaky but clearly not the shape frame designers had in mind when penning the things I see in bike shops. The difference between me and someone like Chris Boardman is huge, and not just in cycling ability! We’re just a completely different shape.

In general, I find I need a smaller frame than is recommended by simplistic height charts, since otherwise the reach becomes unfixable with a shorter stem (I always have to fit a shorter stem, by the way). Another way to say this is that I need the largest frame I can possibly get away with, but that tends to be small.

The problem with a nominally small frame (and a typical steerer length) is that my saddle ends up higher than the bars, often by a lot. I’ve been told I am decently flexible (though I don’t feel that way) and maybe that is why I can put up with this. I have tried riding with bars level with the saddle, but that is actually too high for me, even for quite gentle riding. So although I struggle to get my bars high enough, I wouldn’t want them quite level with the saddle – and you shouldn’t assume you would like that unless you’ve tried it. What works for people with longer torsos and shorter legs/arms may not work for you.

I think 531colin’s advice to perfect your fit on your existing bicycle before getting a new one is sound. You may only need to buy or borrow a high-rise stem to do that.

Personally, I couldn’t imagine either going fast or covering long distances without drop bars. If you can, flat bars would no doubt open up more options for both fit and gearing.

Re: Reducing pannier weight

4 hours 17 min ago
Im doing a tour in May from lanarkshire to Islay/Jura and back and ive just bought a pair of these....

http://www.sportsshoes.com/product/ino3 ... wgod90QAhQ

I wear road shoes for cycling and the above are so light weight n bendy they'll be used for evening wear and Incase the bike breaks down n I need to walk any distance.

Re: Touring frame differences

4 hours 25 min ago
if its a matter of A head extenders Rose Cycles in Germany have some of the longest I have seen - 120mm - I have one and does a great job & dont cost the earth


http://www.rosebikes.com/article/rose-steerer-tube-extension/aid:721075

People wanted for cycle trip Hungary in June

4 hours 31 min ago
Hi all, some friends of ours in Hungary are organising a leisurely week's cycle trip around Lake Balaton in Hungary in June & are looking for people to join them so that they can get group discounts on wine tastings etc. (It's not a commercial venture, they've just got lots of things lined up to go & see/do & want to keep costs down. They're used to organising group walking trips so it's easy for them.) They're very nice people who are completely fluent in English, & are interesting & knowledgeable - we visited them in Budapest last year & had a great time.

They've got everything set up & ready to go, it seems to be pretty cheap & should be a lot of fun. If you're interested have a look at their website
http://www.epicadventures.hu

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

4 hours 48 min ago
22camels wrote:Don't think I'm quite yet ready for recumbents, give me a few years though

Why not? They're just bikes, but bikes (or possibly trikes) that may well solve your problems more directly and thoroughly than fiddling around with the variables on an upright. The relative lengths of your legs and arms becomes pretty much irrelevant and there will be far less strain on your neck. If those are your problems (and it seems they are) then a 'bent may be a fundamentally better way forwards.

There seems to be some weird perception that they're only for people who can't put up with "proper" bikes any more. They're not cycles of last resort, just for people with a more open mind to addressing their cycling needs. I tour on one because it does touring (my idea of it) better than any upright I'm aware of. Around town I use a Brommie or Moulton or 8 Freight (all uprights) because they do their jobs better.

Pete.

Re: Round the world on a unicycle

5 hours 29 min ago
DarkNewt wrote:I am thinking:

Pro's
less weight
less tyre to puncture
less components to go wrong
Easier to get on trains aeroplanes etc..
Easier to jump off if some plank gets to close

Con's
it's a unicycle (in jest no hate mail from unicycle fans please)Also, it tends to be single speed only.

I did read somewhere(?) that it's possible to fit a SA 3sp (fixed) to one. It would certainly help on longer runs on a road.

Re: Touring frame differences

5 hours 46 min ago
22camels wrote:Really appreciate your input though these are two completely separate threads, maybe I should have delayed one of them so as not to cause confusion . Re the test rides, no I've so far found it impossible to set up my desired position on any test ride bikes, because the bars always end up at least a couple of inches too low due to my high saddle height.

On the other thread I have suggested getting comfortable on your existing bike before you go shopping.
A steerer extender, a few stems, and maybe some headset spacers is a lot cheaper than buying the wrong bike.
I don't think you should be difficult to fit, have a look here.....http://www.spacycles.co.uk/info/pedaltosaddle.php...all the pictures have standard forks, you should be able to reproduce any of them on your existing bike using a steerer extender if the forks have been cut short.
Spa have test bikes, but I still think you need to get comfortable on your existing bike before you do any more shopping.

edit.. this pattern of extender...http://www.highonbikes.com/controls/handlebar-stems-road/bbb-extender-quill-to-ahead-bike-handlebar-stem-adapter.html?gclid=CJTW0ZDOz8QCFYnHtAodTUkA4g...needs more spacers, but gives continually-adjustable bar height. I have happily used them with steel steerers.

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

5 hours 56 min ago
The way forward is to use your existing bike as a test bed to get comfortable, then get a new bike next year when you have solved the issues.

You can't "think your way" to a bike fit, particularly when you let demonstrably absurd bike myths get in the way. (eg....."short stems upset the steering"....is absurd. If you can't tell the difference in the steering going from the tops to the hoods to the drops, what difference will 30mm stem length make? You talk happily about using drops or flats on the same bike, that's much more difference than between 2 stems.)
Theres a thread here about bike fit...http://forum.ctc.org.uk/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=74985

Re: maps for the west of USA

6 hours 21 min ago
I will check with my brother. I've had a little look around the USGS site and it's not obvious to me what he does. It's likely to be a few days, though before I can post on here.

Re: Round the world on a unicycle

6 hours 47 min ago
He's started posting a video diary on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yooQkBzNPoc

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

12 hours 50 min ago
22camels wrote:
Edit: I'm now even more puzzled why you say drops exacerbate the problem as it seems to me I can get the same reach and and bar height with drops as I can with straights (possibly with different frame sizes), provided I don't use the drop position on the drops. Yet I'm also a bit puzzled about Thorn having separate sizing for drops and straights frames, as it seems they're assuming a lot about how most people will use drops and straights eg if I spent most of my drop time on the tops and most of my straights time on the ergon gp5 bar ends, I would need a shorter top tube on the latter, contrary to the thorn philosophy..


The idea is that you ride with your hands on the brake hoods (comfy, good position, quick brake response). So good in fact that tandems sometimes have false stoker brake hoods. That puts you about 12 cm further forward than you would be with straights at the same level. But yes, if you go a bit further forward with bar ends on straights but ride on the shoulders of the drops it would be reversed. Bar ends give you an extra bit of height though.

Re: maps for the west of USA

13 hours 47 min ago
Good luck.

Re: Reducing pannier weight

29 March 2015 - 11:06pm
I've yet to put my theory into practice, but I've a spare pair of walking shoes in the pannier so that when I reach the campsite after a wet rainy ride, I have something dry to put on while the spd shoes dry out (hopefully).

Re: Is insurance for a tour in Europe a worthwhile purchase?

29 March 2015 - 11:03pm
£49 sounds a lot

My standard travel insurance covers me for cycling provided that I'm not racing...that's free from my bank

My house insurance covers my bike when I'm on holiday....cover up to £500 is included

My 4 expensive bikes are insured on the same policy for a few pound per month with ensure

I had my wallet stolen in Nice and got all my money and expenses back in 1 phone call

I had a bike accident and had a new for old replacement in a couple of weeks worth £2500

Worth it to me

Re: Touring frame differences

29 March 2015 - 10:56pm
Really appreciate your input though these are two completely separate threads, maybe I should have delayed one of them so as not to cause confusion . Re the test rides, no I've so far found it impossible to set up my desired position on any test ride bikes, because the bars always end up at least a couple of inches too low due to my high saddle height.

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