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Re: A question for the ladies

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 5 hours 11 min ago
First of all, bras. I'm on the larger bossom side and agree that sports bras are nothing short of uncomfortable corsetry. I wear a cheap sports top and accept the mono boob. It's comfy and I'm not ashamed to say that on tour I kind of enjoy 'letting it all hang (in a controlled manner ) out'. I prefer the racing back but take a normal bra for off bike wear. I'm glad it's not only me that has that concern. Along the same lines, knickers and cycling shorts? I went to a lady's cycling evening where knickless shorts and smearing chamois cream were very much advised but that's just not practical. I carry a pair of shorts to wear and a spare. I can't wash and dry shorts every evening. The spongy bits never dry over night. As a result I wear knickers (carefully tested for seam chaffing) Am I the only one?

In terms of worrying significant others, it never stops. I'm a grown up, live in a different city with my partner. I work through the year and all that. I cycle every day yet, every time I talk to my mum about my touring plans she shares her worries. She hates me going and tries her best to put me off. For her, it's just another one of my oddities that she hopes I'll grow out of. (I'm 36). I point out that cycling abroad in Europe is probably far safer than my daily commute. I started a blog so that family could see what I am up to. Now, if I miss a couple of days (if for example wifi is scarce) I'm inundated with gentle 'are you ok' type texts.

Each to their own I think. If I didn't have a summer tour to look forward to - and all the planning and dreaming that goes with it - I'd have to have another adventure up my sleeve. I love finding the little things that make your tour unique and I live off that for the rest of the year. Don't get me wrong, my job is fulfilling and challenging but, I'm not sure how I'd manage the stress without tours to look forward to. I love going off on my own and finding all those little new things. I'm lucky I suppose to have a partner that accepts/supports this and a job with good holidays.

As for weight issues. I jokingly talk about my winter padding. I know that come summer I'll be cycling more and will be fitter. I'm not one for worrying about my weight but it's nice to be as fit as you are when you are on tour. When riding I snack through the day but don't get really hungry until I start to eat in the evening. I try to make enough tea for left overs tomorrow but that never happens. Every year I think that I should keep it up but every year the rest of my life takes over. I suppose I can't cycle all day every day.

Finally, distances. I very much believe in get fit on tour. I expect to be going shorter distances that build up fairly quickly. When I stop depends more often on campsites and what I want to see. 80km a good distance but will happily do 20km either way. The last 10k is a bugger no matter how far you're going. I find that I go best when I have a good goal for the day with a couple of stops planned.

I'm very envious of your four month tour. Whatever you do and whatever you wear it will be brilliant.

Sarah

http://sarahsjogle.blogspot.co.uk/

Re: Bicycle storage conundrum

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 April 2014 - 11:49pm
It wouldn't even need to be a transit, a bike will fit into the back of a small van, but a transit might be more convenient with room for a workshop inside and extra storage!

Re: Bicycle storage conundrum

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 April 2014 - 10:58pm
I was going to suggest a van as well...

cheap and reasonably secure...

Re: Bicycle storage conundrum

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 April 2014 - 10:36pm
Froom2 wrote:My first thought was that we all have allocated parking spaces. Is there such a thing as a bike shed that I could erect in my allocated parking space that would be secure for my bicycle?

Yes. It's called a van.

You will pick up a non-runner Transit-sized van for ±£200. SORN it. Put after-market locks on it. Keep it reasonably clean and keep the tyres inflated. Voila a 5 x 2 m storage shed. No planning permission required.


Alternatively buy a Brompton.


We have a similar arrangement in our block with a shared use store room. I have to admit I probably make more use of it than any one else in the building; currently have: one Brompton, one mountain bike, one kid's bike, one tag-along, and a road bike coming soon. Sssh, don't tell my neighbours.

Re: Bicycle storage conundrum

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 April 2014 - 9:53pm
gaz wrote:Sorry to hear of your dilemma.

It's a shared space issue. Speak to your landlord. Are there any regulations regarding the use of the shed? Do any of the shed's current contents belong to former residents rather than current ones? What is his view on the problem?

Could you get to work on a folder?

I could get to work on a folder... getting back would be a challenge on three gears due to the hill

I've sent my landlord an email to find out, but I'm not very hopeful. I suspect a house move might be in order - I was considering it anyway, just not for another year or so

Re: York 'bad' cycling video

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 April 2014 - 9:17pm
Bicycler wrote:kwackers wrote:Red lights on the other hand exist to reduce congestion and give everyone a fair bite of the cherry. They're not about safety - more accidents occur at traffic lights than pretty much anywhere else. In fact the general misconception that 'green means go' is easily the biggest risk! In contrast once the lights are removed you're simply back to a junction and the risk reduces.
Do you have a source for the introduction of traffic lights to existing junctions increasing accident rates? It seems counter-intuitive, which doesn't make it wrong but I would like to see some evidence. In many cases the original junction would have been a simple crossroads which I had thought were generally associated with high accident rates and basically verboten on new roads.

The TRL review of signals at junctions seems to find the evidence mixed. Page 21 on

http://www.tfl.gov.uk/cdn/static/cms/do ... ssings.pdf

Re: Bicycle storage conundrum

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 April 2014 - 9:12pm
I would not put any of my machines in a shared shed. Many years ago I lived in a fair size bedsit with my own separate bathroom. The bike lived propped up on its back wheel alongside the toilet. I could not sit straight, but my bike was looked after. The worst part by far was carrying it up and down two storeys of narrow winding stairs.

Re: Bicycle storage conundrum

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 April 2014 - 8:58pm
Sorry to hear of your dilemma.

It's a shared space issue. Speak to your landlord. Are there any regulations regarding the use of the shed? Do any of the shed's current contents belong to former residents rather than current ones? What is his view on the problem?

Could you get to work on a folder?

Re: Bicycle storage conundrum

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 April 2014 - 8:56pm
There is no wall space
I have two rooms in my flat, excluding the bathroom: of the two walls in the living room that are long enough to take a bicycle, one is full of sofa, and the other has my animal cage - and besides, is an interior hollow wall thing which is unsuitable for hanging anything of weight on even if it wasn't occupied.

In the bedroom, one wall is covered in the wardrobe, one with the bed, and there is no space inbetween.

Perhaps I need to move house. Perhaps that is the only option Unless there is some way of converting my parking space into bicycle storage, I don't see what on earth I can do.

Re: Bicycle storage conundrum

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 April 2014 - 8:47pm
Is there no way you can keep it inside your flat? Hung on the wall perhaps? The shared 'parking' seems like a nightmare and your right to be wary.

Bicycle storage conundrum

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 April 2014 - 8:26pm
I'm not sure if this fits into this board, but the point is that I need to be able to get at my bike every day to commute to work so..

I live in a block of flats. We have a shed, which has a bicycle rack in it.

The problem is, that the shed is also used for much other stuff, and it is very full. One resident also has a child who owns a buggy, which is, due to lack of other space, usually parked infront of the bike rack. In order to get to my bicycle, I have no choice but to move the buggy on a regular basis. The ONLY place I can put it is on top of the other stuff in the shed.

I just had a very unpleasant discussion with this woman, which had no resolution. I don't know where her child can store their bicycle and I be able to get at my bike, and she doesn't know what else I can do but move it each time. She said if anyone complains to her about their stuff being squashed by this buggy, they will send them to my flat.

My flat is very tiny, and there is very much no space for my bicycle inside it, so that's ruled out as a solution.

I am terrified now, of having people come to me and complain about their stuff being under this buggy, when I literally have no choice if I want to go to work.

Rant over, I am now looking for any ideas at all.

My first thought was that we all have allocated parking spaces. Is there such a thing as a bike shed that I could erect in my allocated parking space that would be secure for my bicycle? Would I have to consider anything like planning permission if such a thing exists? (I could find anything obvious from a brief search)

Is there anything else I could do? I can't make people clear their stuff out of the shed, and there is no requirement to my knowledge that the bike rack be kept clear.

Sorry if this is off-topic. I'm desperate, frustrated, scared and angry

Re: A question for the ladies

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 April 2014 - 8:18pm
I haven't visited this post for a few days and had not realised we had moved on from bras. Guess I was lucky in that my parents never expressed any concerns and left me to get on with my travels. I am sure they had their anxieties, but never voiced them, I would be going anyway... lol My Grandma was pretty concerned and voiced her concerns when 2 school teachers disappeared in France, I was convinced they had just done a bunk and disappeared from the travails of this stressful life we create... sadly it was not so.

During my days of travelling we had no such as blogs, trackers etc., so I had the freedom to just go and not have to report back to anyone.

Who cares about settling down and responsibility, do what your heart dictates.. you are a long time dead.

Re: Leyburn to Reeth

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 April 2014 - 8:13pm
Cheers chaps, drooling already!

Re: Its raining stones

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 April 2014 - 7:32pm
ArMoRothair wrote:661-Pete wrote:When I was a student, living in digs, someone once shot an airgun pellet through my bedroom window. I wasn't in at the time. I didn't think there was anyone with a particular grudge against me, but my landlady thought differently (well it was her house after all): at any rate she insisted on calling the police at once and they arrived promptly. In the meantime I'd found the pellet by rummaging around on the carpet. The cops said they were taking it seriously, they questioned me and they searched my bedroom for any further clues (it was all very informal in those days, helmeted bobbies, no white-coated SOCOs). Anyway nothing more came of it.

An airgun may be a 'soft' weapon to some, but it can be deadly.


Many years ago we were occasionally hearing pinging noises. I put them down to PVC guttering expanding and contracting in the sun. Then one evening I stepped outside the flat and I heard a distinct ricochet sound - exactly like in the movies. I stepped back inside to announce to my other half what I had just heard. We were looking out the window at the block of flats opposite and at that moment she shouted "I see the gun". The gunman had moved and shown himself briefly.

I called the cops. A half dozen of them turned up. I met them downstairs and pointed out which flat was doing the shooting. We heard other shots as we were talking. They were using the sat-dish on our roof as a target.

Went back to our flat and had a ring-side seat of the police raiding the flat opposite. When finished they came back over to take statements from us. They were like kids at Christmas because, as they explained to us, there are many many reports of air-rifle incidents all over the country but they are almost impossible to trace. They were a pleased as punch to have made arrests.

It was one seriously big air-rifle and judging by the way the shots bent the mild steel of the satellite dish it would have been very nasty to be hit by one.
either of my air rifles would do serious damage to a person at anything reasonably close. The air pistol would require pretty close range, but would be easy to use from a vehicle (not that I would).

I reckon a sat dish would end up more peppered than dented with decent pellets - range dependent of course!

Re: Leyburn to Reeth

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 April 2014 - 6:22pm
I'd second that recommendation. It's in Fremington.

Re: Leyburn to Reeth

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 April 2014 - 6:20pm
Galloper wrote:
Can I reccommend the Dales Bike Centre as an excellent stop off. The lemon drizzle cake is excellent.


You can indeed.....where is it exactly?

Re: Its raining stones

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 April 2014 - 6:19pm
661-Pete wrote:When I was a student, living in digs, someone once shot an airgun pellet through my bedroom window. I wasn't in at the time. I didn't think there was anyone with a particular grudge against me, but my landlady thought differently (well it was her house after all): at any rate she insisted on calling the police at once and they arrived promptly. In the meantime I'd found the pellet by rummaging around on the carpet. The cops said they were taking it seriously, they questioned me and they searched my bedroom for any further clues (it was all very informal in those days, helmeted bobbies, no white-coated SOCOs). Anyway nothing more came of it.

An airgun may be a 'soft' weapon to some, but it can be deadly.


Many years ago we were occasionally hearing pinging noises. I put them down to PVC guttering expanding and contracting in the sun. Then one evening I stepped outside the flat and I heard a distinct ricochet sound - exactly like in the movies. I stepped back inside to announce to my other half what I had just heard. We were looking out the window at the block of flats opposite and at that moment she shouted "I see the gun". The gunman had moved and shown himself briefly.

I called the cops. A half dozen of them turned up. I met them downstairs and pointed out which flat was doing the shooting. We heard other shots as we were talking. They were using the sat-dish on our roof as a target.

Went back to our flat and had a ring-side seat of the police raiding the flat opposite. When finished they came back over to take statements from us. They were like kids at Christmas because, as they explained to us, there are many many reports of air-rifle incidents all over the country but they are almost impossible to trace. They were a pleased as punch to have made arrests.

It was one seriously big air-rifle and judging by the way the shots bent the mild steel of the satellite dish it would have been very nasty to be hit by one.

Swiss Mittelland (R5) route

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 April 2014 - 5:04pm
We are planning a trip to Geneva this summer, down the Rhine past Basel to Waldshutt, then the Aare and the R5 to Geneva. Has anyone done the Swiss section of this route? Is there a (cheap) map ... (all I have been able to find on-line is a pretty expensive guide-book).
I'm thinking that the section isn't that long, so do I really need a map or is the signage good enough? The nice thing about a map though, is planning where to stop for the night, so can you recommend any good campsites along the route.
Thanks for your advice

Re: Crikey - Losing my bottle!!!

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 April 2014 - 4:19pm
ChrisPAmbulance wrote:For the rest of the trip back, I found that I was flinching every time I heard traffic coming up behind me and shot over into the gutter when they did, nearly getting off when there was pavement.

Has anyone else experienced this loss of nerve? - Does it last?
It doesn't seem to. One bad ride is usually followed by nothing for months on end, even if it was on my most frequently-used section.

I suspect the first one you describe was a nutter and there was nothing you could do to avoid it, but it may then have made you subconsciously more nervous for the other two. It's counter-intuitive, but diving into the gutter is a pretty bad thing to do because borderline-nutters interpret it as "I'm not worthy - please overtake now without changing lane" or something like that. I try to delay moving as late as possible, but I've noted in other topics (and been criticised for it) that I do dive left sometimes. It's only once put me in a hedge and I'm sure I would have been on a bonnet ornament otherwise that time.

I'd also be writing to the responsible officers and politicians (county council? Highways agency and MPs?) to ask them to make those roads safe for cycling (space4cycling and/or roadjustice) before someone is seriously injured.

Re: Crikey - Losing my bottle!!!

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 April 2014 - 3:34pm
Yesterday I was about 15 cm from being under the back wheels of a tipper truck, cut right across me to exit onto a road to my left (short section of dual carriageway), I could have done nothing about it as he was going in excess of 50mph and likely I'd have been dead or severely injured at best. It would have made not a jot of difference what my road position was, this guy was determined to turn off ahead of me, he went in far too fast for the bend just on the exit https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@51.96258 ... SbMMag!2e0 so could easily have turned after me instead of just pressing the accelarator harder. I was angry for about 10-15 seconds but had to fous on the next hazard ahead and interaction with other vehicles.

This is the closest miss I've had in a while and if he had of hit me would have been by far the worst outcome though I've been struck/knocked off 5 times ever (all in the last 9 years of 30 years cycling). IF i were to keep thinking about the near misses etc I'd go insane.

I do get angry, I do want retribution, I do want to shove my thoughts and anger down motorists throats, but will I still get on my bike and ride..too bloody right I will, nothing will ever bully me off the road . I know the police/politicians/judges don't give a stuff about cyclists despite all their bluster and so called initiatives/proposals but I'm not letting them or the idiots who make cycling miserable at times stop me..

Don't let the b'ds put you off/get you down
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