Feed aggregator

Re: Using cycle paths

CTC Forum - On the road - 1 hour 24 min ago
meic wrote:I have seen barriers "removed" ...

Since removed more formally.

Shornemead Crossing NS317.jpg
That was a substantial metal framed barrier, in place for some years until it was attacked in September 2013 with an angle grinder. It took twelve months for the puny replacement to arrive, it hasn't lasted long.

The section of path through a SSSI opened up by the barrier's removal suffers motorcycle abuse. Such abuse also took place before but I have no doubt that it's absence makes it easier.

Vorpal's right though, that's a social issue and an enforcement issue.

Re: Need advice on a bike tour of Scotland

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 hour 37 min ago
One way to save a lot of distance cycling and hills is to get an evening ferry from Ullapool to Stornoway, cycle down the Heb's to Lochmaddy and get the ferry back to Skye.
Stornoway to Lochmaddy is roughly two 50km days and around 1,000 meters climbing in total.
You still have a big pull up just before Tarbet, just not as big as Bealach na Ba.
Ullapool to Uig on staying the road via Bealach na Ba is 330 km and 5,000 meters climbing ........

So unless you do get hit by a SW gale and/or do want to go over Bealach na Ba then that may be a better option.

Re: Using cycle paths

CTC Forum - On the road - 1 hour 48 min ago
I really like some cycle paths. My regular commute to work (5.5miles) includes about 1.5 miles of cycle path which follows an old railway line, then cuts across fields. Well away from roads for most of the distance. Smooth tarmac too. I see all manner of wildlife: rabbits, mice/voles, deer, owls, raptors, fox, and (once) a badger. It is quiet, and the views are good. Favourite time of year is cycling at dawn or dusk.
I don't mind motorists sharing my roads sometimes - so long as they are careful and courteous- but I'm so pleased that they keep off my cycle track.

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 2 hours 6 min ago
orangebiker wrote:On a point of economics, can anyone explain how the GDP/car thing works?

Using cars and paying for petrol/repairs etc is just one way of spending money that people already have. If they didn't drive a car they would presumably spend it on something else (eg. a bigger house/better food/more bikes....).

Or do you think that if people didn't spend money on cars they would save it up and therefore not be spending it at all?

I am trying to figure out an answer to this. GDP is a crazy measure, not only does it raise with every disaster (and cars do bring about a fair degree of those!) but also it can raise just by passing money from one person to another, even repeatedly.
So GDP will be much higher if a car passes through many owners rather than has one owner for its life.
Cars are quite a large investment, so each transaction has a relatively large effect on GDP.
Compare to food and clothes which are smaller purchases and only transferred between owners a few times, the purchase of the new item normally being the final transaction.

Though I am sure that services and virtual products could be even more use at raising GDP as they dont need any real life material to be bound up in them. The best example being something like turning an un-made bed into £1,000,000 by calling it Art. However most of the population are not quite that gullible.

Re: Using cycle paths

CTC Forum - On the road - 2 hours 22 min ago
In the five years that I carried my daughter around in the trailer, I dont recall any barriers that I was allowed to go through that I couldnt go through but I did have some moments where I almost lost control or fell over. Also she sometimes got a face full of brambles because I couldnt reach her and the bike at the same time.

I was out on a CTC ride this weekend and somebody turned up on anICE trike and they had help lifting it over gates three times that I saw as there was no possibility of it getting through the barriers, without a handy cycle group he would have been unable to pass.

As a Sustrans Ranger I have always raised complaint about barriers, a bit of a personal hobbyhorse. My Coordinators always declare that they too have objected and the barriers are imposed by either private landowners (understandable) or the Council. The Council often cite the Police as declaring it a condition for getting consent for the path, I always ask how or why the Police have any say in this and the answer is along the lines of "that's how it is".

I have seen barriers "removed" and there is one gate between two public roads which is very awkward to open and even get an ordinary bike through and it is between two public roads which join up again in a few hundred meters, I always expect somebody to have lifted it when I get there but it is always still there. I guess because people can just take the A40 for those few hundred meters instead of using the gate to get on the smaller road the NCN route follows.

Re: Using cycle paths

CTC Forum - On the road - 2 hours 44 min ago
[XAP]Bob wrote:And that's the key.
You can't rely on getting off cycle paths, particularly in a new area.
Therefore you can't use them...
It's not can't use them..
It's won't because there's to much uncertainty and/or hassle to use them.

I do use a few around the Northampton/Wellingborough/Kettering area, but it's only because I know them and they do make that part of the trip easier.
But there's a lot I don't because there's no advantage to using them, in a lot of cases it because staying on the road is both quicker and/or safer.

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 2 hours 51 min ago
The best way to get people to change en-mass is to invent something other than a car which meets your needs for less drain on resources damage to the environment etc but which is more desirable from the selfish/ego boosting needs of the user. And bikes and buses don't work in this sense.

Re: Need advice on a bike tour of Scotland

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 hours 9 min ago
Radomir, the route looks good. I sympathise with your dilemma. The problem that all cycle tourists face; what to leave out. The answer of course is to come back in 2016.

Cape Wrath is one of those Iconic headlands that people feel the need to visit. It's one of the last few areas of wilderness left in the UK. You should try to fit it in if you can, especially if the weather is good. One possibility is to leave the bikes at Durness or on the far side of the ferry crossing and use the Minibus service that runs between the ferry and the lighthouse. That would probably save you half a day. Unfortunately I don't know of any hostel accommodation within half a days ride going south. The hostel at Inchnadamp (approx 70 miles) is about the closest that I know of. Another Idea, as I mentioned previously, is to use the bus between Durness and Ullapool.

In addition to Cape Wrath, if you have time, go the few extra miles from Kilchoan to visit the Lighthouse on Ardnamurchan, before getting the ferry to Tobermory

I will send you some links for accommodation etc.

Re: Using cycle paths

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 hours 14 min ago
[XAP]Bob wrote:You can't rely on getting off cycle paths, particularly in a new area. Therefore you can't use them...
Quite so. (Thanks, Bob, reohn2, and others; this topic has obviously struck a nerve with a number of people )

Trying to make the best of a bad situation, are there any on-line mapping sites which indicate the presence — if not the nature — of barriers on cycle paths? At the moment I'm reduced to using the street views in the Journey Planner on Cyclestreets.net to check for tandem traps where cycle paths intersect with google-mapped roads … a laborious process and not always satisfactory. (Should I post this as a separate thread? It is about using cycle paths, but is perhaps it's a bit of a diversion on an already-existing diversion … about diversions. )

Re: Using cycle paths

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 hours 42 min ago
And that's the key.

You can't rely on getting off cycle paths, particularly in a new area.

Therefore you can't use them...

Re: Using cycle paths

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 hours 43 min ago
Tigerbiten wrote:My whole point is don't trust that I can get down an english cycle path.
I get to the start of one and look down it and think "Am I going to get down it or am I going to be stopped by a barrier/narrow point".
And because I don't trust them, I rarely use them.

Yes I got that,and think it's disgusting that you should have to think that way before considering using what is supposed to be cycle friendly infrastructure.Then to risk the possiblity of being shouted,gesticulated and abused by motorists for not using such bad provision just adds insult to injury!

Mistik-ka's experiences posted up thread infuriate me almost as much as they did him and his wife/stoker.
To think that someone spends money to fly from Canada to the UK for a cycling holiday to be met with this kind of shambolic infrastructure is disgraceful IMO.

Where's the CTC,Sustrans,BC and other cycling support groups in all this?

Re: Using cycle paths

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 hours 56 min ago
My whole point is don't trust that I can get down an english cycle path.
I get to the start of one and look down it and think "Am I going to get down it or am I going to be stopped by a barrier/narrow point".
And because I don't trust them, I rarely use them.

Re: My worst tour, and why..

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 hours 51 min ago
We've had the odd bad weather day on most tours, but the worst was a a week in the Scottish Borders a few years ago. It rained every single day, and as it was a moving on tour we had to set out in it every day for a week. It was July, I know that because the TdF was taking place. On the plus side the scenery was very good, when you could see it through the mist

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 5 hours 34 min ago
mrjemm wrote:By making cars utilitarian devices with minimal comfort and variation between versions, and taking control out of the hands of the occupant, car use will likely diminish radically, I suspect. They are of course very useful, but that should be their extent. There should be a limited or even no element of pleasure in the use of them, and this use should be not easy to abuse- i.e. all are capable of the same, restricted, performance...


As much as I have no real interest in cars the problem with this approach is that you could as easily apply it to bikes. Why should there be carbon fibre road bikes as well as fat-tyred MTBs? Why cyclo-cross as well as hybrids? You'd end up with us all riding three speed, steel-framed step-throughs because it would be cheaper and more energy-efficient (energy in terms of bike-building) than building a vast variety of bikes. Of course the performance of such could be better by young, fit men as opposed to elderly women so in that sense they could not be 'restricted' but essentially you're going down the one-party state model.

Trabant anyone? Or Flying Pigeon? The latter was (and probably still is) the most popular bicycle manufacturer in China. The basic model used to weigh 20 kilos.

Re: Need advice on a bike tour of Scotland

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 5 hours 53 min ago
There is no snow in Moscow now but a little bit cold (till -5). Off-roads are very well. That's why we try to go out of the city as often as possible.

Sorry for my a little delay...
I have changed the project of out track and you can find it here.
http://www.gpsies.com/mapOnly.do?fileId ... Leave=true
Direct lines are trains with 1 change in Glasgow.
I've made the above using all advices but... it is impossible to go everywhere. So, I prefer the most important and famous areas (as seems to me). I understand that we can find more quiter and friendly roads on the islands.
Total length of our way is ~ 1300 km now (without train and ferry-boats). But 1000 km is the best for us (with minimal height ).
The mileage will down till 1100 km If we exclude Cape Wrath and take a train from Edinburgh to Dalwhinnie at the beginning of our way.
What can we do else? Is it necessarily to visit Cape Wrath or we can find there approximately the same views as Skye, for example. Of course, we will go to the Cape in case of good weather but we have one day more if we exclude Cape Wrath....
We will have total ~ 20 days of run and would like to visit the most interesting places of Scotland and don't lose a time "between cars".

Re: Cycle Touring in Japan

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 5 hours 59 min ago
simonhill wrote:I am normally paranoid about leaving my bike outside overnight, but in Japan there were bikes everywhere. Only once did I leave it right out front, but most of the time I left it in the open parking area or round the side of the hotel, etc. I always kept it under some sort of cover, even if only a fire escape and always locked it to something. After a few days I stopped worrying. To sum up how safe it was, there was a roadside stall selling oranges. Not only was there a cash box, but there was a row of ¥100 coins, enough to change a ¥1000 note (£6).

Japan is very safe and your bike will be totally safe even if not locked up. The Japanese would suffer a loss of honour if it did get stolen so people lock things to avoid the remotest chance of a loss of honour. I have seen workers passed out drunk on the train late at night with their jackets hanging open and their weeks/months wages sticking out their inside pocket and nobody touches it. Also no worries about being a woman travelling alone or out late at night on your own.

Re: Front lights with a bar bag

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 6 hours 4 min ago
Here's one I made earlier: an example of how neat and compact and no less effective your lighting can be when you become your own power station!

Eyc-on-bracket.jpg
This tiny lamp nevertheless projects a full 50 lux, yet weighs just 70 grams and stands only 45mm above the guard when you make your own bracket. Mounted this low, it's true the front tyre casts a shadow some 2 or 3m ahead, but I don't have any problem with that. If I haven't seen a pothole until it's that close: I reckon it's safer anyway than swerving to hang loose for a bumpy ride!

The bracket is made from two pieces of extruded alloy angle, cut to match when nested thus and bolted through the guard, which is reinforced by the tail of the longer alloy section running back and carefully bent upwards (around a curved former) to be secured via the usual fork-crown mudguard bolt. All the nuts and bolts in this setup are also alloy.

Ready-made brackets are fine for tall folk with high handlebars. My arrangement works for short to middling people. To keep things lower (but still high enough to illuminate the road effectively) I used to make neat little stainless steel angle brackets to fit V-brake braze-ons and the featherweight Hella FF-Micro halogen headlamp. The B&M Eyc is the first LED lamp I've seen that's light enough for such simple mounting solutions.

Re: Cycle Touring in Japan

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 6 hours 59 min ago
In reply:

I don't speak Japanese and got by OK. I was surprised to find how little English there was. I think this is a result of poor (spoken) English teaching and a reluctance to try - the Japanese are a very reserved people.

Annoyingly, there is lots of written English, but it is just for show, eg shop names, the name of a cake on a packet although the rest of the writing is in Japanese and my favourite, a folder in the hotel labelled "Information" in English, but all the stuff insde was in Japanese!

I don't think travelling is rocket science and I find it easy to get by in most places. When I walk into a hotel, they don't think I have come to pick up the laundry or fix the lift, but realise I want a room. In the cv's all items are priced and you just hand them over and they ring them up on the till using the same numbers we use. The restaurants either had a menu showing the food or plastic models outside. All very easy.

I should have said before, but almost every road direction sign was also in English.

The main thing I miss by not having the language is conversations, but you need a pretty good level to make it more than a collection of inane questions and answers.

My advice is if you want to go, go. Don't worry about the language.

I kmow the weather at that time of year is good as it is when I usually travel in the region. Nonetheless it wasn't luck, I do a lot of research on the weather before I go anywhere. Sites like accuweather and wunderground both have excellent historical climate info.

I am normally paranoid about leaving my bike outside overnight, but in Japan there were bikes everywhere. Only once did I leave it right out front, but most of the time I left it in the open parking area or round the side of the hotel, etc. I always kept it under some sort of cover, even if only a fire escape and always locked it to something. After a few days I stopped worrying. To sum up how safe it was, there was a roadside stall selling oranges. Not only was there a cash box, but there was a row of ¥100 coins, enough to change a ¥1000 note (£6).

Re: Using cycle paths

CTC Forum - On the road - 6 hours 59 min ago
Bicycler wrote:reohn2 wrote:IMO there's a difference between hillwalking and walking to the shops,the paths required are completely different.
Wheelchair users who wish to experience the countryside won't be able to get to the top of some of the peaks in say the Lakes,or other such highlands.
I think that's accepted to a large degree by them,and that some places aren't safe for wheelchair use.
Of course that's true. Though you would be surprised at the capabilities of modern off road mobility scooters and it is not just those with wheelchairs who struggle with things like stiles.

The principle regarding barriers is the same whether it is an urban ginnel, a moorland bridleway, a cycle path or a road. For any of us a route may be too long, too steep, too poorly surfaced or beyond our abilities and these are things we all have to take into account. However, a man-made barrier should not be the limiting factor which determines whether we may or not use the route.

I agree,I was generalising to make a point that seems obvious to some,but not others

Re: Using cycle paths

CTC Forum - On the road - 6 hours 59 min ago
ukdodger wrote:What's surprised me in this thread is the total lack of public spiritedness among some cyclists. What's wrong for us apparently should not be allowed sums it up.


Public spriritedness is in contradiction to ukdodger wrote:everyone cant be catered for.
Syndicate content

Archive

  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541

 

Terms and Conditions