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Re: Road positioning. Is it me?

CTC Forum - On the road - 57 min 34 sec ago
Vantage wrote:TonyR wrote:Just an afterthought to the comments of a number of others: I rarely look behind at following traffic - I think it tells them you know they're there and should be getting out the way. Instead I drift slowly across the lanes or between secondary and primary so its clear what I'm doing but slowly enough for drivers to react. Again I rarely have problems doing so.

I can't disagree with this enough.
This is like expecting motorists to give a ****. They don't.
On one particular roundabout, if I hadn't checked behind on my left, saw the huge Audi suv creeping up the inside on the same lane as me and if I hadn't swerved like hell back to the right, I'd have been under it and waiting for an ambulance. Or a hearse.
+1
As a more vulnerable road user we should be more observant not less. There's a big difference between riding confidently & taking control of your space & behaving like you don't care if they run you down.

Re: longer/flatter v shorter/pointier

CTC Forum - On the road - 1 hour 33 min ago
This is doubtless useless information for you, but anyway...

On a hilly round trip commute (remembering they give on the downs and take on the ups) of 20 miles I tended to average 15MPH. On a less hilly (it is all hilly around here) round trip commute to another place of 36 miles I averaged 16MPH. I alternated between the two places so my fitness can be assumed to be fixed for the purpose of comparison.

So flatter for me was measurably quicker, but not to the extent that it would see me seeking out a flat route which was significantly longer, as the gain in average speed wouldn't have been sufficiently beneficial for me...

On a separate note, actually remembering this information, and choosing to share it with the world, does seem to mark me out as being remarkably dull!

Re: Road positioning. Is it me?

CTC Forum - On the road - 1 hour 46 min ago
TonyR wrote:Just an afterthought to the comments of a number of others: I rarely look behind at following traffic - I think it tells them you know they're there and should be getting out the way. Instead I drift slowly across the lanes or between secondary and primary so its clear what I'm doing but slowly enough for drivers to react. Again I rarely have problems doing so.

I can't disagree with this enough.
This is like expecting motorists to give a ****. They don't.
On one particular roundabout, if I hadn't checked behind on my left, saw the huge Audi suv creeping up the inside on the same lane as me and if I hadn't swerved like hell back to the right, I'd have been under it and waiting for an ambulance. Or a hearse.

Re: longer/flatter v shorter/pointier

CTC Forum - On the road - 2 hours 2 min ago
On a journey of that length, it maybe is. I calculate it (or rather, gMap Pedometer does) at just over 50 miles. If it was me then I'd look for the flatter route.

Re: Bicycles from Britain to Continent

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 hours 37 min ago
Eurotunnel is £22 in July and Aug. Other times it is £18.

Re: Map reading - can anyone do this now?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 hours 49 min ago
Jimstar79 wrote:I've always used paper maps but have started looking at getting hold of a Nokia 520 or higher for its offline gps navigation function - free downloadable maps and navigation without even needing to connect to the internet. I'm planning on heading up into the north west of Scotland and am thinking: do I have to buy paper maps to cover the entire area? Will they be 'heavy' or take up room in my bags? Would a cheap smartphone be adequate? What happens if it runs out and I'm in the middle of nowhere? A small, light smartphone like the Nokia 520 would be easy to use and weight wise I'll hardly even notice it being there. I'm in a slight dilemma. Paper or digital, or both?

There aren't many roads in north-west Scotland so unless you intend to ride on off-road tracks and paths, a page or two torn out of a road atlas will be sufficient, unless you need contours. I was up there myself recently and used the Philips Navigator Scotland, at 3 miles to the inch (1 1/2 to the inch in the central belt). It is very clear and the pages will fit an A4 sleeve. The Achiltibuie-Lochinver section was on two separate pages, so I use Streetmap to print out a page from the OS, centred to keep it on one page.

Alternatively you could take the Nicolson Road Map 2. Based on the old OS 1/250,000 series it covers an area from Cape Wrath to Greenock, the Outer Hebrides to Dingwall, with beautiful shaded contour lines. It is a bit heavier than a few pages from the atlas.

I took a Garmin with me but only used it to find my way through Inverness. I would never rely on it alone, though - I always take some kind of map, as well as a small compass.

Re: longer/flatter v shorter/pointier

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 hours 32 min ago
bovlomov wrote:Is there a rule of thumb for calculating the easier route, between a longer, flatter route and a shorter one with lots of hills? It must be partly to do with physique and riding style, but it would be good to have a rough guide to work with.

It's train strike day on Thursday and I need to get from Barnet to Oxford, and back. Well, the Chilterns are in the way, so there's no avoiding hills, but I could avoid the worst ones by adding 8 or 10 miles. Is it worth it?

no buses? cant take a train part way? or to some where nearby. how pressed for time? adding 10 miles to a journey quite a lot

Re: Giant MPH hydrolic disc brake jammed on..

CTC Forum - MTB - 4 hours 57 min ago
Its It's common in the hot weather on the MPH. If the adjusting wheel on the master cylinder doesn't have enough adjustment to cure it then crack open the bleed nipple on the caliper and let out a tunt dribble of fluid.

Re: Road positioning. Is it me?

CTC Forum - On the road - 6 hours 45 min ago
... and design roundabouts with a single lane to prevent it.

The trouble is UK roundabouts are designed to maximise vehicle speeds and flows as opposed to continental geometry which is designed to maximnise safety by slowing vehicle speeds:
http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/+/http://www.dft.gov.uk/adobepdf/165240/244921/244924/TAL_9-97/

Re: longer/flatter v shorter/pointier

CTC Forum - On the road - 6 hours 49 min ago
Hi,
I would leave early and relax and admire the view...........

Re: longer/flatter v shorter/pointier

CTC Forum - On the road - 7 hours 5 min ago
Only you can answer the question, because it depends on how you personally cope with hills. For the long term, if you keep records from your rides you will be able to use the data to calculate estimated ride times in future. I've never bothered logging ascent on the bike, but when I was fellwalking my own personal Naismith's Rule was 4.2mph and 1000ft/hr. Compared with the 'standard' figures of 3mph and 2000ft/hr you can see that I was a fast walker and a slow climber.

Re: Road positioning. Is it me?

CTC Forum - On the road - 7 hours 10 min ago
On any small to medium sized roundabout there is absolutely no reason for anyone to overtake anyone on the roundabout itself. Because the system we use in the UK - the same as in most other countries (but not all) - is that traffic already on the roundabout has priority, once you get on the roundabout you should be off it again in a few seconds. Unless the traffic around you is gridlocked of course. This applies whatever sort of vehicle you are using.

They ought to make it a specific offence to overtake on a roundabout.

Re: Road positioning. Is it me?

CTC Forum - On the road - 7 hours 10 min ago
Just an afterthought to the comments of a number of others: I rarely look behind at following traffic - I think it tells them you know they're there and should be getting out the way. Instead I drift slowly across the lanes or between secondary and primary so its clear what I'm doing but slowly enough for drivers to react. Again I rarely have problems doing so.

Re: Road positioning. Is it me?

CTC Forum - On the road - 7 hours 54 min ago
NATURAL ANKLING wrote:Hi,
Roundabouts are best taken at speed that way there is less time for others silly manoeuvre BUT if you have to stop and a cars behind they always think your too slow.

Keep your wits about you.

I'd agree with this to a certain extent.
I feel safer carrying some speed through so that I'm not holding up traffic which can annoy other road users and sometimes lead to stupid undertaking or crossing lanes in front of me. But not so fast that I can't Brake in time for the odd pillock who pulls out in front of me from the left as I approach.
Such an incident happened to me years ago which wrote off the bike and has caused me to be terrified of roundabouts ever since.
I've always approached roundabouts in the way that TonyR described above.
One if the things I love about my gps is that it shows the roundabout layout before I reach it and so I'm able to better choose which lane to be in well in advance.

Re: Map reading - can anyone do this now?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 hours 1 min ago
I've always used paper maps but have started looking at getting hold of a Nokia 520 or higher for its offline gps navigation function - free downloadable maps and navigation without even needing to connect to the internet. I'm planning on heading up into the north west of Scotland and am thinking: do I have to buy paper maps to cover the entire area? Will they be 'heavy' or take up room in my bags? Would a cheap smartphone be adequate? What happens if it runs out and I'm in the middle of nowhere? A small, light smartphone like the Nokia 520 would be easy to use and weight wise I'll hardly even notice it being there. I'm in a slight dilemma. Paper or digital, or both?

Re: Bicycles from Britain to Continent

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 hours 15 min ago
Indeed a retrograde step - BUT almost as good, depending on where you are going, is the Eurotunnel bike service - last time I looked it was only 16 quid each way for bike AND passenger.

Go to St Pancras - take the High Speed 1 (Javelin) to Folkestone West with your bike wheeled on - ride to the Holiday Inn Express up the road and the minibus and trailer takes you through the tunnel - TGV trains onwards (many now take assembled bikes) from Calais Ville or Frethun .... or ride on from Calais. We've used it 4 or 5 times - excellent service and value.

Rob

Re: CTC Bike Bag - A word of warning!

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 hours 23 min ago
I always.flew.to South America with BA my bike always on a box I never hat any problem

Re: Route from Dunkirk to WHPV Championships at Maasmechelen

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 9 hours 49 min ago
When you leave the ferry terminal at Dunkerque you will come to a roundabout where the ferry traffic takes the first exit (right), if you take the second exit (straight on signposted Mardyk) you can avoid the ferry traffic and have a fairly quiet ride to the T junction. Turn right and follow this road and it will take you to the main road you would have got to anyway but at a more convenient place. Either cross this road (signposted Craywick I think, which will lead you to the quieter roads) or follow the main road towards Dunkerque - there is a cycle path - I'm not sure how far it goes.

Re: longer/flatter v shorter/pointier

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 hours 28 min ago
I can't offer a formula but I'd say it's sometimes worth varying your route eg by returning home a different way. At least you increase your local knowledge for future journeys. (And it may make it harder for them to keep tabs on you...................so long as it doesn't arouse suspicion. )

Re: Suggetsions for food on tour with a tiny budget

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 hours 13 min ago
Here's an interesting book on cycle touring cookery: http://bikecampcook.com
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