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Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 hours 3 min ago
22camels wrote:...........
531colin - the spa cycles link you posted in the other thread, http://www.spacycles.co.uk/info/pedaltosaddle.php, is a good illustration of what i mean here. I need a saddle to pedal height of 37in, and in the photo (http://www.spacycles.co.uk/smsimg/uploa ... tourer.jpg) you see that in the recommended frame (57cm) presumably with the full steerer, the bars still barely reach the level of the saddle........................

Since we did all those photos, there is now a 60cm bike, which I have personally fitted quite happily to riders 6' 6".
Crotch to floor on me is about 32", saddle to pedal is about 34", that's this on a 54cm bike http://www.spacycles.co.uk/smsimg/uploads/tourer/5434tourer.jpg
I'm 5' 10", you are an inch taller than me with crotch to floor 88cm, that's about 34 1/2" , or 2 1/2" longer than my legs.
I actually designed the 54 for me, the 60 head tube is 2 1/2" taller than the 54, I would be ever so surprised if it were too small for you.
Since the photos, we have also changed the fork supplier, the steerer is now 350mm.....after all this time I have no idea what length the steerers in the photos were cut to.....you could probably scale it from the 700c wheel, if you had a mind to.
You can be considered to have long legs for your height, or a short torso for your height....that being the case, you might fit better on a 57 with an uncut steerer, as the reach is less, although if you also have long arms, it might all cancel out. (I have never heard of 1 1/8" steel steerers breaking.....ever).
The 60cm bike is huge....like a field gate with wheels.

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 hours 8 min ago
22camels wrote:horizon, why do you suggest a drop bar Sherpa retrofitted with straights is preferable to a straight bar Sherpa?



Two points:

1. Thorn (to their credit) run two frame lengths throughout their range. They reckon that because drop bars throw you foward 12 cm (see above), the top tube needs to be correspondingly shorter for drop barred bikes. Of course, no-one (AFAIK) really knows what the starting point for this is: is Thorn making its drop bar bikes shorter or its straight bar bikes longer? In the end I came to the conclusion that it was the latter, just. (Thorn's short tubes are just a tiny bit shorter than others e.g. Club Tour versus Spa).

Anyway, assuming that Thorn's drop bar bikes are normal (whatever length that is) they are shorter than straights (e.g. 565S and 565L). So if you are not normal and need a shorter frame, buy the drop bar bike and put straights on it. La voila! The top tubes on my MTBs are longer than the top tubes on my tourers. But put straights on my tourer and voila! Of course if want drops you are still struggling: basically, drops on a 700c frame with a normal steep head tube will require long arms - the wheel cannot come back any further as it would hit your toes.

2. I haven't talked about bar height because it isn't the same problem. Although height and reach are related due to the angle of the head tube, really it's easy to deal with height - you just keep on going upwards - six feet anyone? To get more bar height, just leave the steerer uncut. To get the bars lower - well ... If only it were that easy with top tube length.

Re: Touring possibly the South of France along the coast

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 hours 15 min ago
I have cycled from Monaco to Perpignan with detours to Avignon, Nimes and Beziers and I don't remember any really difficult climbs. Much of the way is especially around the Camargue is very flat. Don't know of any special cycle routes but most of the roads are cycle friendly.

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 hours 34 min ago
"Blimey, you're all making me feel like I have really stumpy legs... at 179cm and 83cm bfso height…"

I think that's close to average. I first realised my legs were long when I let a mate the same height as me try my bike out, I had to lower my saddle by over 5cm for him!

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 hours 40 min ago
Blimey, you're all making me feel like I have really stumpy legs... at 179cm and 83cm bfso height...

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 hours 56 min ago
and the bars are still 2 inches below the saddle,

Only 2 inches?

Mine are nearly 8 inches below - "Why is that guy riding his hybrid like a road bike.."

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 hours 57 min ago
22camels wrote:re recumbents, my main objection is it seems it would make me the centre of attention in some places.. I don't want to stand out. And how does it handle off-road?

If you don't want to stand out, fair enough. You will, and then some.
(off road depends on what level of "off-road", on a typical track they're fine, close veg around singletrack tends to bite a bit more, if you need to bunny hop stuff then not much good (but then not is a loaded tourer if you're jumoing rocks and roots!))

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 hours 57 min ago
I don't see the problem with the Spa bike. Bars level with the saddle with plenty of seatpost showing. If necessary they could easily be raised further by using a high rise stem. As mentioned above the standard riding position on a drop barred bike is on the brake hoods, not the drops themselves.

Re: Best Farcility of the Year?? £210,000 Wasted?? Chicheste

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 hours 58 min ago
TonyR wrote:VanDriver wrote:I'd likely join the flow of traffic as I'd feel safer and I'd be able to get on rather than wait and give way. The scheme is going to encourage some drivers to believe that they have - not only at this giratory but on the roads in general - priority over cyclists.

To be fair to them the Council's website on the changes does say:

Motorists should also be aware that cyclists are not required by law to use the cycle lane and that they have an equal right to use the main carriageway, should they choose to do so. This road position is often preferred by more confident cyclists.
Not much use just saying it on the website, it needs to be on a billboard in the middle of the roundabout.

Re: Would this bike be a suitable entry level tourer

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 hours 4 min ago
I was perusing Decathalon with the same idea.

I considered the Hoprider 520 but they didn't have one in the shop. Looked at the Riverside 500 which was comfortable, but disliked the front suspension, therefore probably ditto for the Hoprider 520.

Better for touring might be the Hoprider 300 and Hoprider 500, both without suspension and looking fairly robust. B'twin have chunky downtubes on many of their hybrids.

The Hop 500 with 24 gears might win out over the Hop 300's 21 gears, but a downside, depending on your POV, is both have 700c wheels instead of 26".

Re: maps for the west of USA

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 hours 5 min ago
Here's what someone on theACA site said

"I have found that National Forest maps are ideal for cycling - the scale is 1inch = 2 miles.
Many have topo contours now and most are now available in plastic.
Crossing the Cascades might entail two or three maps - same for the Rockies.
They have campground, backroad, trail and facilities information.
Plus, land ownership status for those who wish to do dispersed camping."

There's an outfit in Seattle, Metsker Maps, http://www.metskers.com/ that sells maps for the world over. You can even get OS maps from them. They may be able to help with Forest Service maps (much touring terrain is in National Forests)

Re: The Gaurdian: Cycling near misses

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 hours 6 min ago
Vantage wrote:Lately I'm finding that despite being all for stopping at red lights in the past, I am now more likely to jump them just so I don't have a dozen maniacs behind me waiting to race past at millimetre tolerances before cutting me up as they turn left.
Turns out that if there's one thing that annoys motorists more than seeing a cyclist jump a red light - it's being stuck behind a cyclist when the lights go green...

Drives them daft and thus entertains me no end.

Re: The Gaurdian: Cycling near misses

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 hours 9 min ago
horizon wrote: There are more stopping points like traffic lights giving you the opportunity to place yourself in front of a motor vehicle. You have so much more influence over traffic.

Lately I'm finding that despite being all for stopping at red lights in the past, I am now more likely to jump them just so I don't have a dozen maniacs behind me waiting to race past at millimetre tolerances before cutting me up as they turn left.

Re: The Gaurdian: Cycling near misses

CTC Forum - On the road - 5 hours 1 min ago
I feel so much safer in the town. Traffic is slower. There are more bikes. There are more stopping points like traffic lights giving you the opportunity to place yourself in front of a motor vehicle. You have so much more influence over traffic. On the fast, open road around here it's the opposite and much more challenging.

(This is just my quick response and I accept that a bit more discussion is required.)

Re: The Gaurdian: Cycling near misses

CTC Forum - On the road - 5 hours 2 min ago
brynpoeth wrote:The Guardian asks: Why, when the real risk is so small, are people so reluctant to cycle?

Even when one takes all possible precautions and tries to be prepared for anything, the risk feels enormous. I have been a very keen cyclist since 1973. Now I often ask myself whether I should give up cycling in the town (Lübeck, population 217 000, Germany) altogether. Outside, cycling is still fun by the canal or on separate cycle ways. In the town, it is something for bungee-jumpers and kamikazes.

Lubeck compared to the UK is like heaven! Yes i've been there several times by bike and whilst the city centre is fairly busy its nothing like Sheffield on a Sunday afternoon even at busy times! I'll swap your busy roads for my quiet ones anytime! please.

Re: The Gaurdian: Cycling near misses

CTC Forum - On the road - 5 hours 14 min ago
The Guardian asks: Why, when the real risk is so small, are people so reluctant to cycle?

Even when one takes all possible precautions and tries to be prepared for anything, the risk feels enormous. I have been a very keen cyclist since 1973. Now I often ask myself whether I should give up cycling in the town (Lübeck, population 217 000, Germany) altogether. Outside, cycling is still fun by the canal or on separate cycle ways. In the town, it is something for bungee-jumpers and kamikazes.

Re: Would this bike be a suitable entry level tourer

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 5 hours 15 min ago
tm2383: this bike weighs 18 kg. A better (more expensive) touring bike will weigh around 14 kg, possibly less. Even trekking bikes come in at that price and weigh only 14 kg. E.g. http://dawescycles.com/product/mojave-gents/.

So you have to decide whether that extra 4 kg matters - for many people it's the weight of their tent and sleeping bag combined and more.

But I think more important is how far you want to travel in a day. If you are planning on tow paths and camping and keping to say 30 - 40 miles per day then this bike is OK but higher mileages may need a lighter bike (and no suspension).

That rack by the way will take 25 kg but that might not be over rough ground day after day. If you need a front rack then suspension causes complications.

Re: Anyone not been hit by a car

CTC Forum - On the road - 5 hours 25 min ago
I have only been hit by a car once, or rather my bike has: aged about 12-13 at night I made a right turn into a side road across the path of a driver of a Rover P6. I honestly thought the car was much further away, fooled by the inboard, i.e. close together, pair of the four headlights being lit. At the last instant I realised my mistake and that my only option was to pedal harder: the car just took off my mudguard mounted rear dynamo light with 'snick' noise. I remember the driver was a bit cross and a lot shook up. At about the same time, again at night, I rode into the back a parked dark green Thames van on my own street (lit with those yellow sodium lights) and was knocked out by the contact with the back window. A helmet might have avoided the KO that night, Dad hammered the forks of my Hercules Hustler straight the next day and it carried on for a year or two more without problem.

No more contact with a vehicle when cycling since those own fault incidents in the mid 1970s, though I have had two minor low speed filtering nudges when motorcycling, both times partly to blame, and two minor prangs when driving, both definitely down to the other driver.

Re: Would this bike be a suitable entry level tourer

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 5 hours 32 min ago
I've seen people touring on all manner of bikes from carbon road bikes (with rucksack) to heavily laden Dutch roadsters.
If the bike is reliable and your itinerary isn't too ambitious I'm sure a "city bike" would be ok.
I've not used a bike with suspension but I'm sure that Sweep is right in this regard.

Touring possibly the South of France along the coast

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 5 hours 56 min ago
I am looking to do a two week cycling holiday with a friend at the begining of May. Last year we did some of the veloldysee and really enjoyed it so this year we wanted to try somewhere else in France. We both want to be by the sea and somewhere warm so the obvious choice at this time of year is the South of France but we cant see any obvious cycle routes. Does anyone know of any that they have enjoyed? We need somewhere quite flat as I am just recovering from chemo and not up for huge hills. We are also planning on using camp sites.If not the South of France, does anybody have any other suggestions? Any other destinations that might fit the bill? We want to go by train as we want to use our own bikes and dont want to fly. Thanks
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