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Re: ITV TdeF coverage; any good?

CTC Forum - Racing - 2 hours 1 min ago
A continuous barrage of wattage and heart rate statistics would put me right off but YMMV. I remember a couple of interesting Boardman/Boulting pieces on aerodynamics which were quite interesting in a previous year and I wouldn't mind a few more things like that but I wouldn't want the race commentary to be full of information on bike specs (I thought that it wasn't about the bikes!)

Boardman is a good pundit and obviously a nice guy. I'm slightly uneasy with the amount of product placement of his bikes and kit in the ITV coverage.

I associate Phil Liggett's distinctive voice so much with the tour now that it would seem wrong for someone else to be doing it. He calls the conclusion of a race at least as well as anybody out there.

I've always liked Gary Imlach. His humorous remarks really make the ITV's coverage for me. I think his cynicism is a healthy trait for a cycling journalist at the current time.

Overall I do think they do a good job. I like the relatively understated production and it benefits from not being a mainstream sport on ITV1 with big name presenters. It would ruin it if an increase in the Tour's future popularity led to a brash Sky Sports-style production and presenting team.

Re: Triumph of HiViz over common sense?

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 July 2014 - 11:43pm
mjr wrote:mrjemm wrote:Sounds like you're arguing that because someone in hi-vis can be seen by a motorist, he'll get less space... despite making little sense to me, I think I'll stick to wearing hi-vis when I deem it suitable (i.e. when I remember or can be bothered); I'd rather be seen than not.
Which is fine except 1. the important thing is contrast not fluorescence (ride among the yellow sunflowers and other crops here while wearing yellow and you're not going to be seen); and 2. by visibly endorsing the idea that special clothes are helpful/safer for ordinary cycling you are helping to deter people from riding if they haven't spent money on the special gear.

Those two reasons combined with some informal testing of rides with/without hi-vis and counting the close passes (no significant effect, FWIW); and the general faff of remembering/carrying special clothes mean I put more reflective (which does seem to work, especially in low-light) tape on my bikes (because I forget the bike when riding) but rarely wear fluo any more.

Also, there was a small but not statistically significant reduction in the amount of verbal/horn abuse from other road users when not wearing hi-vis and helmet. Make of that what you will, but Ian Walker's research is probably more reliable than my counts.

And to that I refer you to the rest of my post that you left out...

Have fun.

Re: Touring bike alternatives?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 July 2014 - 11:12pm
How Far Can You Go On A £10 Touring Bike? (Answer: A Surprisingly Long Way)


http://tomsbiketrip.com/how-far-can-you ... ring-bike/

Re: Touring bike alternatives?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 July 2014 - 10:51pm
Back in the Spring I bought a Fuji touring bike from Evans in Bristol and love it. It cost £550 and I had £50 of free accessories as part of a promotion they were doing which allowed me to put some quality mudguards on it and buy a few tools for it too. It rides great, looks great and the bar end levers are really growing on me as I've never used them before. The down side is the weight as it's a bit of a 'boat anchor' but I'm really not bothered too much at the moment and I'm hoping to tour on it next year.

However, in recent weeks I've noticed that Evans' stock has dwindled to a few oddball sizes and now it's completely out of stock although I've read that Fuji produce them in batches and hope to see it reappear.

Re: A-hole in a van.

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 July 2014 - 10:48pm
thirdcrank wrote:Vorpal

Having been stuck a few times myself on the motorway, including being held up most of the day in the queue at what I believe is still the most serious UK motorway crash in terms of fatalities, I'm interested in the idea of opening a gap in the central barrier to allow the queuing traffic to do a U-turn. How does that work, except when the traffic flow is extremely light? In particular, what's the result of stopping the traffic coming the other way to allow this to happen? How do you avoid a situation where you have as many people queuing - with possible in-queue crashes - as you are releasing from the other queue?

We've recently had a stretch of motorway upgraded with variable speed limits and fancy signs that might have been programmed to facilitate something like this but solid concrete central barriers were installed at the same time so there are obviously no plans for anything like that here in the foreseeable future. Incidentally, all this is the responsibility of the Highways Agency and the police are only consulted as what it's fashionable to call stakeholders, and stakeholders of reducing importance since the motorway control centres are now staffed by the HA's own people and their "Traffic Officers" deal with the great majority of incidents.
I've seen it done similarly in the USA, Germany, and Italy. Large cities may have arrangements that allow the traffic direction to be changed on the outside lanes in either direction. Lacking that sort of arrangement, they just cone off the outside lane, or block it with a police car, and put a couple of generic warning signs up. The turned traffic goes into the outside lane, and other lane(s) continue as before, albeit somewhat more slowly if traffic is heavy.

Where the central barrier is concrete, they still build in periodic gaps, or removeable sections. https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@42.75026 ... B-xfMw!2e0 Where the space between lanes is wide, they may even build in crossings https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@42.76149 ... WMUx7g!2e0
I'm not sure how the removable concrete sections work. I think they must use the winch from a tow truck or something. I've never seen it done, but I have gone through a gap made by removing a concrete section. I have also seen sections of metal barriers that are removable. In some places, gates are more common. Most states in the US have a law that makes it illegal for any vehicle, other than an emergency vehicle or a highway maintenance vehicle, to make a U-turn by crossing the median of an interstate highway and they put signs up to reinforce this. It is also likely to be enforced by police. But then, they make exceptions for when people are directed by the police. The same crossing points are used during road works as well. In the US, I think they only close or gate them where illegal crossings are a problem, or likely to be.

Re: ITV TdeF coverage; any good?

CTC Forum - Racing - 22 July 2014 - 10:46pm
Hi,
I go along with most if not all that Si said.............did I just say that......he's a Mod
I wish that there was more technical detail on those long drawn out cruising sections between sprints and climbs.

Boardman and Ned are great just want more.
I would like the commentators to introduce all the men say one team a day with numbers so you can follow the riders, and the graphics to show more detail, especially real time speed and gears they are using.
More about the bikes.
Fact last non CF frame winner was Pantani on Alu......................
2005 lowest resting HR by two riders was Horner an another 35, average was 50
Lightest that year 57 k and heavist 95 k

Liggett said today some of the riders were 45 k (2014) ......................is that true 7 stone

Cav was typicaly true to form in his wavy fast slow speech like a essentric record

Re: ITV TdeF coverage; any good?

CTC Forum - Racing - 22 July 2014 - 10:45pm
Si wrote:The was a chap on BikeMagic many years ago who used to maintain a list of Duffieldisms. We worked out what most of them meant, although "He's going up and down like a ragman's trumpet" took some research!

It wasn't just his turn of phrase but the way he sometimes revealed an apparent boredom with the racing. Referring to spectators picnicking at the roadside during an individual time trial stage he once remarked along the lines "Look at these poor people here - they'll be stuck here all day." Er, quite.

I once emailed him to point out that passing under the flame rouge, with Eric Decker about to win a stage after a long lone breakaway, with the bunch closing in fast and David Millar somewhere in the gap, the audience at home wasn't very interested in a discussion about the possibility of the TdeF returning to the UK. If Russell Williams hadn't intervened, he'd have missed the finish completely. A couple of days later, he stopped a similar mistimed waffle himself with a comment that people didn't like that sort of thing near the end of the race. Well, it is supposed to be one of the more interesting bits, Dave.

Re: ITV TdeF coverage; any good?

CTC Forum - Racing - 22 July 2014 - 10:34pm
Oh well, try France 2/3. Their ad breaks are monumentally long but infrequent.

Re: ITV TdeF coverage; any good?

CTC Forum - Racing - 22 July 2014 - 10:28pm
For those of us who work and need to catch up I think it's perfect and on at an ideal time too. There's noubt wrong with Eurosport either and when I watch on a weekend I'll merrily flick between the two when prompted by an ad break although it's surprising how often the ad breaks are in synch!

Re: ITV TdeF coverage; any good?

CTC Forum - Racing - 22 July 2014 - 10:18pm
Si wrote: ... ITV4 doesn't have the strange foreign adverts. ...

They do have plenty of lengthy ad breaks whose timing seems to be decided elsewhere. Some of this is predictable, such as during mountain descents, but this year, after the coming climb of Cragg Vale had been ikn the local news for months and the "world record" length of bunting had been draped there, there was an ad break during the climb, although coverage did resume to show the crowds at the top. And while I'm on, Paul Sherwen got several places on the route completely wrong. eg IIRC he was in Heptonstall when the footage showed Oxenhope.

Re: A-hole in a van.

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 July 2014 - 10:14pm
bigjim wrote:mjr wrote:Cyclist assaulted: can't be bothered to attend; but if your motor vehicle gets slightly damaged: double-crewed visit.
Double crewed? You'd be lucky.
Some exaggeration there methinks. It's that sort of attitude that contributes to the police leaving in droves. NHS workers suffer the same sort of attention when one of their numbers lets the profession down. Apart from the cycling bit the above reads like a Dail Mail comment.
Maybe it was luck, but say what I see. Also I know anecdotes aren't data but data on this isn't readily available so anecdotes is all I've got.

To be clear, I don't blame the responding officers for this - I assume that they don't decide how many to send on each call... or not - but the management and policy setters and ultimately the home office. And don't get me started on the NHS management and the current Dilbert-style "battling business units" approach of trusts and groups!

Re: Univega Alpina

CTC Forum - MTB - 22 July 2014 - 10:04pm
According to Bikepedia most likely a 1994 http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/Bike ... CeGS1I_Zws

A Polish catalogue, but I don't think it shows the whole range as the 5.4 is missing http://www.retromtb.pl/pdf/univega94.pdf

Re: Isle of Man - where's good to ride and stay?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 July 2014 - 10:03pm
Been to the IOM 5 times on a bike. We always stayed in B&B's in Douglas apart from the last time, when we camped at Kirkmichael. The TT course is worth doing once, the classic 7 mile climb from Ramsey to the top of the mountain and the swooping descent back into Douglas.

There's plenty of little country lanes too. The Tholt Y Wiil climb from Sulby Glen to the top of the mountain, the ride up from Union Mills to Injebreck (these are all hilly rides). There are some nice lanes going down towards Castletown and Port Erin. The roads around Jurby in the north-west are quiet and flat. The coast road from Douglas going north round to Ramsey via Laxey is a nice ride and not too busy (most traffic goes over the mountain).

Re: Wearing earphones

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 July 2014 - 9:55pm
If you use ear buds then invest in mirrors, or get some of these http://www.runnersneed.com/pws/UniqueProductKey.ice?ProductID=RAFS0001BB&gclid=CJjQxonl2b8CFfMZtAod6mkAbg&gclsrc=aw.ds I'm totally deaf in my left ear and losing hearing in my right - and I don't hear cars until they are on top of me unless I wear my hearing aids. I feel much safer when I've got my aids in!

Re: Getting to Whitehaven

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 July 2014 - 9:54pm
Bicycler wrote:I will whinge to anyone who will listen about Northern rail and their antiquated junk but I have to agree that the conductors are quite amenable to cyclists on the cumbrian coast line. In some ways their flexibility is preferable to a mandatory reservation system.

Agreed on both counts

SNCF RER trains, has anyone ever been kicked off?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 July 2014 - 9:50pm
We are travelling with the kids (8 & 10) to Brittany in August, ferry tickets are booked. We need to get the train from Roscoff to Redon in order to give us our planned route back.

A sLight glitch with our tour plans appeared on my visit to SNCF in Picadilly today. I'd already researched the train link and spoken to them by phone but when I got there today the agent said there were no bike spaces available on any of the TGV trains for the day we arrive in France. There is also no availability if we were to reverse our plans and get the train back from Redon.

The main alternative is a very long day (nearly 12 hours of hanging around train stations and 3 bits of train rides) for the kids using the TER regional train service or maybe a very expensive taxi ride. I am Researching the taxi option but before I commit to the TER option I'd be gutted to plan to use the TER train and then to be told that there were no bike spaces left as we could end up with a 15 hour day or, at worst, rushing around finding accommodation in Morlaix!

Are TER conductors likely to be accommodating on a quiet train if there are too many bikes do we think?

To put it in context we have had mixed experiences travelling with SNCF and bikes before. My husband did the pack it up small approach on a no bike TGV and got a lot of grief from the conductor ( he didn't get chucked off but is still a bit sensitive on the subject all these years later). I lost my bike for 3 days once using the send ahead system for bikes ( don't do this on a weekend). Having said that I have had a couple of good experiences with the bike including an amazing ride through the Cevennes down to Ales in the guards car and on another quiet TER type service but some years ago.

Ps I have tried the old threads and read the SNCF velo site.
PPS can anyone else get the maps to work on the SNCF velo site?

Re: A-hole in a van.

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 July 2014 - 9:48pm
Vorpal

Having been stuck a few times myself on the motorway, including being held up most of the day in the queue at what I believe is still the most serious UK motorway crash in terms of fatalities, I'm interested in the idea of opening a gap in the central barrier to allow the queuing traffic to do a U-turn. How does that work, except when the traffic flow is extremely light? In particular, what's the result of stopping the traffic coming the other way to allow this to happen? How do you avoid a situation where you have as many people queuing - with possible in-queue crashes - as you are releasing from the other queue?

We've recently had a stretch of motorway upgraded with variable speed limits and fancy signs that might have been programmed to facilitate something like this but solid concrete central barriers were installed at the same time so there are obviously no plans for anything like that here in the foreseeable future. Incidentally, all this is the responsibility of the Highways Agency and the police are only consulted as what it's fashionable to call stakeholders, and stakeholders of reducing importance since the motorway control centres are now staffed by the HA's own people and their "Traffic Officers" deal with the great majority of incidents.

Re: Newsbeat article re conviction rates

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 July 2014 - 9:41pm
Oh, I thought that it was pretty clear to everyone reading that the un identified driver was exactly the sort of idiot who shouldn't hold a licence to drive. But his attitude is indicative of those who think that "just clipping a cyclist" is in some way less morally culpable than ploughing into a woman with a pushchair. Which ought to diminish if more people cycle or have close friends or relatives who do.

Re: Wearing earphones

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 July 2014 - 9:38pm
So are you riding in a state of mind where you will leap out of the way of any vehicle coming from behind that you think is going to hit you?

I can not tell which ones are going to hit me, none have so far so I would have wasted my time, every time that I took evasive action but I still could kid myself that I had saved my life by doing so.

Or the other option is that you are riding along assuming that there is nothing behind you and can move around as if you have the road to yourself, not an assumption that I make, I make the default assumption that something may be behind me and check visually before moving my road positioning.

Re: Alaska to Argentinia

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 July 2014 - 9:35pm
Mick F wrote:Just be careful.
This is a sad story from only recently.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-27206659

This is a sad story but I'm sure it also applies to the uk so don't let it out you off.
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